Abdal of Turkey

The Abdallar also named Teberler, are a Turkish-speaking with much Turkmen grammar socio-cultural Indo-Turkic people group found mainly in central and western Anatolia, and some live in Istanbul, who follow an itinerant lifestyle. This lifestyle is closely connected with the activity of music making at weddings. Other occupations associated with the Abdal include tinning, basket making and sieve manufacture.[1]

OriginEdit

In Ottoman Archives from the 18th century and 19th century, they are mentioned of Turkman Kıptileri in the Balkans, who are different as the Romani people in Rumelia. They spoke only Turkish with only few Romani words in there jargon. The Turkification of this subgroup was already completed at the time of the Ottoman Empire, who once migrated at the 16th century from Central Asia to Anatolia and finally settled in the Balkans in Ottoman Empire, and also in the Crimean Khanate.[2] The three most remarkable characteristics of the group are its close relationship with the Alevi sect, its use of a secret language (Abdoltili/Teberce) or argot and its wide distribution. It seems that the name Abdal was associated with Alevi dervishes of Central Anatolia, whose existence is first recorded in the 16th Century. These Abdalan-ı Rum were extreme Alevis practising celibacy and withdrawal from the world. Their unorthodox behavior led to their suppression by the Ottoman authorities.[3] The Abdal language consists of borrowing from Hindustani language, Persian with some Rumelian Romani words with an essentially Turkish and Turkmen grammar.[4] According to the Abdal themselves, there Ancestors once came from North India and went to Afghanistan-Iran-Central Asia and than to Ottoman Anatolia, and are intermarried with tribe's of Turkmen. They say they are not like the Romani people in Turkey and distance themselves from them.[5]

In southwestern Turkey, the Abdal play a particular role as musicians, minstrels, jewelers and magicians to the nomadic Barak Turkmen, as a dependent group. Abdal encampments are found at the edges of the Yörüks camps. A similar relationship also exists with the Tahtacı and Turkmen tribes. In the area north of Ankara, many Abdal are sedentary, but associated with certain activities as circumcision (a sacred Muslim tradition) and barbering.[6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.katki.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/1_2.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  2. ^ https://cejsh.icm.edu.pl/cejsh/element/bwmeta1.element.desklight-3cab4f74-c132-4d94-8614-87dcadeaa343/c/PN.03.14-05.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  3. ^ Marginal Groups and Itinerants by Ingvar Savanberg pages 602 to 612 in Ethnic groups in the Republic of Turkey / compiled and edited by Peter Alford Andrews, with the assistance of Rüdiger Benninghaus (Wiesbaden : Dr. Ludwig Reichert, 1989) ISBN 3-88226-418-7
  4. ^ https://dergipark.org.tr/tr/download/article-file/156808
  5. ^ Abdal by Peter Alford Andrews pages 435 to 438 in Ethnic groups in the Republic of Turkey / compiled and edited by Peter Alford Andrews, with the assistance of Rüdiger Benninghaus (Wiesbaden : Dr. Ludwig Reichert, 1989) ISBN 3-88226-418-7
  6. ^ Marginal Groups and Itinerants by Ingvar Savanberg pages 602 to 612 in Ethnic groups in the Republic of Turkey / compiled and edited by Peter Alford Andrews, with the assistance of Rüdiger Benninghaus (Wiesbaden : Dr. Ludwig Reichert, 1989) ISBN 3-88226-418-7

Abdal (caste)