ATF Dingo

The ATF Dingo is a German heavily armored military MRAP[3] infantry mobility vehicle based on a Unimog chassis with a V-hull design, produced by the company Krauss-Maffei Wegmann (KMW). It is designed to withstand land mines, rifle fire, artillery fragments and NBC-threats. ATF stands for Allschutz-Transport-Fahrzeug, meaning all-protected transport vehicle in German. It is named after the Australian native dog, the dingo. Currently KMW is developing the Dingo 2 GFF for the German Army with increased internal volume.

Dingo 2
Dingo 2.jpg
ATF Dingo 2 with a mounted machine gun
TypeInfantry mobility vehicle
Place of originGermany
Service history
Used byOperators
WarsWar in Afghanistan (2001–present)
Production history
ManufacturerKrauss-Maffei Wegmann
Unit cost~$500,000 (2006)[1]
Specifications
Mass8.8 - 11.9 t
Length5.45 m (short)
6.08 m (long)[2]
Width2.3 m
Height2.5 m
Crew5 (short)
8 (long)

ArmorMEXAS
EngineDiesel
160 kW
Suspension4x4
Operational
range
1,000 km
Maximum speed 90+ km/h

Textron signed an exclusive deal to produce and market KMW's Dingo in the United States.[4] However, Textron chose its own more expensive and heavier M1117 Armored Security Vehicle for the MRAP competition, which did not receive a contract.[5]

DesignEdit

The ATF Dingo has a modular design with five elements: chassis, protection cell, storage space, engine compartment, and bottom mine blast deflector. Its design is lighter and includes an armored chassis with a blast pan instead of the more common monocoque hull found in modern blast resistant vehicles. IBD's layered MEXAS is used and the windows are angled to deflect blasts and bullets. A tarpaulin is used over the back storage area instead of metal to save weight.

The Dingo's standard armament is a Rheinmetall MG3 7.62 mm machine gun in a remote-controlled turret on the top of the vehicle, borrowed from KMW's Fennek. The operator sits safely inside the cabin, controlling the weapon with an electro-optical sight with night vision capability.

In 2008 the Bundeswehr ordered several hundred fully remote-controlled weapons stations from KMW, for its Dingos and other armored vehicles: the light FLW 100 (for the MG3 or the Heckler & Koch MG4), and the heavy FLW 200 (for the M3M .50 BMG or the HK GMG automatic grenade launcher). The weapons station is controlled by an operator viewing a monitor inside the vehicle.

The ATF Dingo 2 is an advanced version of the Dingo, based on the upgraded Unimog U 5000 chassis with improved protection and more payload. It is offered in two versions with 3,250 (3.5 tonnes payload) and 3,850 mm (4 tonnes payload) wheelbase. The Dingo 2 can seat eight personnel.

OperatorsEdit

 
Map of ATF Dingo operators

Current operatorsEdit

country version ordered options delivered[6] notes
  Germany - Bundeswehr (Army) Dingo 1 147 0 147
Dingo 2 A1/A2/A2.3 287 0 287
Dingo 2 BÜR (ground surveillance radar) 78 0 2
Dingo 2 A3 system repair 25 0 4
Dingo 2 C1 GSI battle damage repair 48 0 48 deliv. by end 2010
Dingo 2 A3.2 troop transport 45 0 45 deliv. by end 2010
Dingo 2 A3.2 operational intelligence 20 0 0 ordered 17.11.2010
Dingo 2 A3.3 troop transport 39 0 0 ordered 17.11.2010
  Germany - Federal Police Dingo 2 Polizei 2 0 2
  Belgium - Belgian Land Component Dingo 2 MPPV Fus (patrol) 158 0 158
Dingo 2 MPPV PC (mobile command post) 52 0 52
Dingo 2 MPPV ambulance 10 0 10
Dingo 2 (new variants) 0 66 0
  Luxembourg - Luxembourg Army Dingo 2 Protected Reconnaissance Vehicle 48 0 48
  Austria - Austrian Armed Forces Dingo 2 ATF 60 0 60
Dingo 2 AC NBC reconnaissance 12 0 12
Dingo 2 AC ambulance 3 0 3
  Czech Republic - Czech Army Dingo 2 A2 21 0 21
  Norway - Norwegian Army Dingo 2 A3 20 yes 20
  Iraq -Iraqi Army & Peshmerga Dingo 1 20 0 20 [7][8]
  Qatar - Qatari Army Dingo 2 A3.3 troop transport 125 0 125 [9] [10]

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Dingo - All Protected Vehicle (APV)". Defense Update. Archived from the original on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 7 May 2015.
  2. ^ Krauss-Maffei Wegmann – DINGO 2 – Ihr Partner rund um Wehrtechnik Archived September 28, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ http://www.military-today.com/apc/dingo_2.htm
  4. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20200310044349/http://www.bfbreakthroughdesign.com/textron/textronmarineland_products_land_dingo.htm
  5. ^ http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-6037098_ITM
  6. ^ http://www.strategie-technik.de/08_10/heer.pdf[permanent dead link], retrieved 15 November 2010
  7. ^ http://www.bild.de/politik/inland/isis/diese-waffen-liefert-deutschland-an-die-kurden-37478284.bild.html
  8. ^ http://www.bundeswehr.de/portal/a/bwde/!ut/p/c4/NYvLCsIwEEX_KNOID3Rn6MaduNG4KdNmKME8SjKxIH68ycJ74WzOvfCE2oBvOyPbGNDBA_RkT-MqxtWQwBcXco6ywJIHQ34gGzLyB-7tWRdTDMSNTIFt5ZyQYxJLTOyaKSlVI6wB3cleyUP3j_we9VVtN91-11_UDRbvzz-MsZiD/
  9. ^ Nkala, Oscar. "Germany approves export of military vehicles, small arms to Algeria". Defenceweb. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  10. ^ https://www.army-technology.com/projects/dingo2protecetedvehi/

External linksEdit