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2019 World Athletics Championships – Women's 1500 metres

The women's 1500 metres at the 2019 World Athletics Championships was held at the Khalifa International Stadium in Doha, Qatar, from 2 to 5 October 2019.[1]

Women's 1500 metres
at the 2019 World Championships
VenueKhalifa International Stadium
Dates2 October (heats)
3 October (semi-final)
5 October (final)
Competitors35 from 23 nations
Winning time3:51.95
Medalists
gold medal    Netherlands
silver medal    Kenya
bronze medal    Ethiopia
← 2017
2021 →

SummaryEdit

Like the men, championship level women's 1500s also typically turn into strategic, sit and kick affairs. In 2017, strategic worked for Faith Kipyegon to leave the world record holder Genzebe Dibaba behind. Sifan Hassan was also left behind by that tactic. In 2019, she set the world record in the mile and had already won the 10,000 metres at these championships.

The final started inauspiciously enough, Gabriela DeBues-Stafford eventually found herself in the lead, Hassan dropped to the back of the pack. After 200 metres, Hassan moved out to lane 2 and moved forward around everyone into the lead. Kipyegon and Gudaf Tsegay moved in behind her to watch. Even with the slow start the first lap was 1:03.51. None of the chasing runners looked relaxed, most were working hard to stay up. Laura Muir and Jenny Simpson moved up toward the front. The second lap was 1:02.44. During the third lap, Muir positioned herself for the final lap, getting onto Kipyegon's shoulder coming onto the home stretch, then up to Hassan's just before the bell at 2:52.59. Muir stayed in position through the turn, Kipyegon and Tsegay behind her a gap forming behind. Hassan ran the third lap in 1:01.46, then looked back at Muir and took off sprinting. A big gap formed quickly, Kipyegon going around Muir in chase. Hassan kept looking back like a hunted animal being chased, but the gap continued to grow as did Kipyegon's separation from the next group of four; Muir, Tsegay, Shelby Houlihan with DeBues-Stafford trying to hold on. As Kipyegon saw hope was lost, she began to slow back toward the chasers. Houlihan moved to lane 2 to try to sprint past Tsegay, instead Tsegay pulled away gaining on Kipyegon. Hassan won by close to 15 metres. Kipyegon glided across the line for silver barely ahead of a rapidly closing Tsegay.

Hassan's time of 3:51.95, places her as the #6 runner in history behind Dibaba and two infamous races in China in the 1990s. Well beaten, Kipyegon, Tsegay and Houlihan moved to #11, #13 and #15 on that list respectively. Even sixth place DeBues-Stafford ranks as #21. Hassan set the European record that had been held by Soviet Tatyana Kazankina for 39 years, Houlihan the North American record, Kipyegon the Kenyan record and DeBues-Stafford the Canadian record.

RecordsEdit

Before the competition records were as follows:[2]

Record Perf. Athlete Nat. Date Location
World 3:50.07 Genzebe Dibaba   ETH 17 Jul 2015 Monaco
Championship 3:58.52 Tatyana Tomashova   RUS 31 Aug 2003 Paris, France
World leading 3:55.30 Sifan Hassan   NED 12 Jul 2019 Monaco
African 3:50.07 Genzebe Dibaba   ETH 17 Jul 2015 Monaco
Asian 3:50.46 Qu Yunxia   CHN 11 Sep 1993 Beijing, China
NACAC 3:56.29 Shannon Rowbury   USA 17 July 2015 Monaco
South American 4:05.67 Letitia Vriesde   SUR 31 Aug 1991 Tokyo, Japan
European 3:52.47 Tatyana Kazankina   RUS 31 Aug 1980 Zürich, Switzerland
Oceanian 4:00.86 Linden Hall   AUS 26 May 2018 Eugene, United States

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
5 October Final Sifan Hassan   NED 3:51.95 CR, AR

ScheduleEdit

The event schedule, in local time (UTC+3), is as follows:[3]

Date Time Round
2 October 17:35 Heats
3 October 23:00 Semi-finals
5 October 20:55 Final

ResultsEdit

HeatsEdit

The first six in each heat (Q) and the next six fastest (q) qualified for the semi-finals.[4]

Rank Heat Name Nationality Time Notes
1 1 Sifan Hassan   Netherlands (NED) 4:03.88 Q
2 1 Faith Kipyegon   Kenya (KEN) 4:03.93 Q
3 1 Nikki Hiltz   United States (USA) 4:04.00 Q
4 1 Winnie Nanyondo   Uganda (UGA) 4:04.04 Q
5 1 Ciara Mageean   Ireland (IRL) 4:04.18 Q
6 1 Sarah McDonald   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 4:04.42 Q
7 1 Lemlem Hailu   Ethiopia (ETH) 4:05.61 q
8 1 Kristiina Mäki   Czech Republic (CZE) 4:06.61 q, PB
9 1 Esther Guerrero   Spain (ESP) 4:06.99 q
10 3 Jenny Simpson   United States (USA) 4:07.27 Q
11 3 Gabriela DeBues-Stafford   Canada (CAN) 4:07.28 Q
12 3 Laura Muir   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 4:07.37 Q
13 3 Marta Pérez   Spain (ESP) 4:07.48 Q
14 1 Georgia Griffith   Australia (AUS) 4:07.73 q
15 3 Claudia Bobocea   Romania (ROM) 4:07.76 Q
16 3 Malika Akkaoui   Morocco (MAR) 4:08.05 Q
17 3 Linden Hall   Australia (AUS) 4:08.12 q
18 3 Daryia Barysevich   Belarus (BLR) 4:08.19 q
19 2 Rababe Arafi   Morocco (MAR) 4:08.32 Q
20 2 Winny Chebet   Kenya (KEN) 4:08.36 Q
21 2 Gudaf Tsegay   Ethiopia (ETH) 4:08.39 Q
22 2 Shelby Houlihan   United States (USA) 4:08.51 Q
23 3 Axumawit Embaye   Ethiopia (ETH) 4:08.56
24 2 Jessica Hull   Australia (AUS) 4:08.71 Q
25 1 Sara Kuivisto   Finland (FIN) 4:08.85 PB
26 3 Esther Chebet   Uganda (UGA) 4:08.89
27 2 Yolanda Ngarambe   Sweden (SWE) 4:09.22 Q
28 3 María Pía Fernández   Uruguay (URU) 4:09.45 NR
29 2 Aisha Praught-Leer   Jamaica (JAM) 4:09.81
30 2 P. U. Chitra   India (IND) 4:11.10 PB
31 2 Caterina Granz   Germany (GER) 4:12.36
32 2 Jemma Reekie   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 4:12.51
33 2 Maruša Mišmaš   Slovenia (SLO) 4:14.94
34 2 Carla Mendes   Cape Verde (CPV) 4:23.56
35 3 Neide Dias   Angola (ANG) 4:28.27

Semi-finalsEdit

The first 5 in each heat (Q) and the next two fastest (q) qualified for the final.[5]

Rank Heat Name Nationality Time Notes
1 2 Jenny Simpson   United States (USA) 4:00.99 Q
2 2 Gabriela DeBues-Stafford   Canada (CAN) 4:01.04 Q
3 2 Laura Muir   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 4:01.05 Q
4 2 Gudaf Tsegay   Ethiopia (ETH) 4:01.12 Q
5 2 Winny Chebet   Kenya (KEN) 4:01.14 Q
6 2 Winnie Nanyondo   Uganda (UGA) 4:01.30 q
7 2 Nikki Hiltz   United States (USA) 4:01.52 q, PB
8 2 Jessica Hull   Australia (AUS) 4:01.80 PB
9 2 Yolanda Ngarambe   Sweden (SWE) 4:03.43 PB
10 2 Linden Hall   Australia (AUS) 4:06.39
11 2 Marta Pérez   Spain (ESP) 4:10.45
12 1 Sifan Hassan   Netherlands (NED) 4:14.69 Q
13 1 Shelby Houlihan   United States (USA) 4:14.91 Q
14 1 Rababe Arafi   Morocco (MAR) 4:14.94 Q
15 1 Faith Kipyegon   Kenya (KEN) 4:14.98 Q
16 1 Ciara Mageean   Ireland (IRL) 4:15.49 Q
17 1 Sarah McDonald   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 4:15.73
18 1 Lemlem Hailu   Ethiopia (ETH) 4:16.56
19 1 Esther Guerrero   Spain (ESP) 4:16.66
20 2 Malika Akkaoui   Morocco (MAR) 4:16.83
21 1 Daryia Barysevich   Belarus (BLR) 4:17.04
22 1 Georgia Griffith   Australia (AUS) 4:17.15
23 1 Kristiina Mäki   Czech Republic (CZE) 4:17.65
24 1 Claudia Bobocea   Romania (ROM) 4:18.25

FinalEdit

The final was started on 5 October at 20:55.[6]

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
  Sifan Hassan   Netherlands (NED) 3:51.95 CR, AR
  Faith Kipyegon   Kenya (KEN) 3:54.22 NR
  Gudaf Tsegay   Ethiopia (ETH) 3:54.38 PB
4 Shelby Houlihan   United States (USA) 3:54.99 AR
5 Laura Muir   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 3:55.76 SB
6 Gabriela DeBues-Stafford   Canada (CAN) 3:56.12 NR
7 Winny Chebet   Kenya (KEN) 3:58.20 PB
8 Jenny Simpson   United States (USA) 3:58.42 SB
9 Rababe Arafi   Morocco (MAR) 3:59.93
10 Ciara Mageean   Ireland (IRL) 4:00.15 PB
11 Winnie Nanyondo   Uganda (UGA) 4:00.63
12 Nikki Hiltz   United States (USA) 4:06.68

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Start list
  2. ^ "1500 Metres Women − Records". IAAF. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  3. ^ "Women's 1500 Metres − Timetable". IAAF. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  4. ^ Heats results
  5. ^ Semi-finals results
  6. ^ "1500 Metres Women − Final − Results" (PDF). IAAF. 5 October 2019. Retrieved 6 October 2019.