2003 Canarian regional election

The 2003 Canarian regional election was held on Sunday, 25 May 2003, to elect the 6th Parliament of the Autonomous Community of the Canary Islands. All 60 seats in the Parliament were up for election. The election was held simultaneously with regional elections in twelve other autonomous communities and local elections all throughout Spain.

2003 Canarian regional election

← 1999 25 May 2003 2007 →

All 60 seats in the Parliament of the Canary Islands
31 seats needed for a majority
Registered1,439,784 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg8.2%
Turnout930,449 (64.6%)
Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.9 pp
  First party Second party Third party
  Adán Martín 2002 (cropped).jpg José Manuel Soria 2014 (cropped).jpg Portrait placeholder.svg
Leader Adán Martín José Manuel Soria Juan Carlos Alemán
Party CC PP PSOE
Leader since 2003 16 July 1999 2000
Leader's seat Tenerife Gran Canaria Tenerife
Last election 26 seats, 37.3%[a] 15 seats, 27.1% 19 seats, 24.0%
Seats won 23 17 17
Seat change Red Arrow Down.svg3 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg2 Red Arrow Down.svg2
Popular vote 304,413 283,186 235,234
Percentage 32.9% 30.6% 25.4%
Swing Red Arrow Down.svg4.4 pp Green Arrow Up Darker.svg3.5 pp Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.4 pp

  Fourth party
  Lorenzo Olarte 1979 (cropped).jpg
Leader Lorenzo Olarte
Party FNC
Leader since 2003
Leader's seat Gran Canaria
Last election 0 seats, 4.8%
Seats won 3
Seat change Green Arrow Up Darker.svg3
Popular vote 44,703
Percentage 4.8%
Swing Arrow Blue Right 001.svg0.0 pp

CanaryDistrictMapParliament2003.png
Constituency results map for the Parliament of the Canary Islands

President before election

Román Rodríguez
CC

Elected President

Adán Martín
CC

OverviewEdit

Electoral systemEdit

The Parliament of the Canary Islands was the devolved, unicameral legislature of the autonomous community of the Canary Islands, having legislative power in regional matters as defined by the Spanish Constitution and the Canarian Statute of Autonomy, as well as the ability to vote confidence in or withdraw it from a President of the Government.[1] Voting for the Parliament was on the basis of universal suffrage, which comprised all nationals over eighteen, registered in the Canary Islands and in full enjoyment of their political rights.

The 60 members of the Parliament of the Canary Islands were elected using the D'Hondt method and a closed list proportional representation, with an electoral threshold of 30 percent of valid votes—which included blank ballots—being applied in each constituency. Alternatively, parties could also enter the seat distribution as long as they reached six percent regionally. Seats were allocated to constituencies, corresponding to the islands of El Hierro, Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, La Gomera, La Palma, Lanzarote and Tenerife. Each constituency was allocated a fixed number of seats: 3 for El Hierro, 7 for Fuerteventura, 15 for Gran Canaria, 4 for La Gomera, 8 for La Palma, 8 for Lanzarote and 15 for Tenerife.[1]

The electoral law provided that parties, federations, coalitions and groupings of electors were allowed to present lists of candidates. However, groupings of electors were required to secure the signature of at least 1 percent of the electors registered in the constituency for which they sought election. Electors were barred from signing for more than one list of candidates. Concurrently, parties and federations intending to enter in coalition to take part jointly at an election were required to inform the relevant Electoral Commission within ten days of the election being called.[2][3][4]

Election dateEdit

The term of the Parliament of the Canary Islands expired four years after the date of its previous election. Elections to the Parliament were fixed for the fourth Sunday of May every four years. The previous election was held on 13 June 1999, setting the election date for the Parliament on Sunday, 25 May 2003.[1][2][3][4]

The Parliament of the Canary Islands could not be dissolved before the date of expiry of parliament except in the event of an investiture process failing to elect a regional President within a two-month period from the first ballot. In such a case, the Parliament was to be automatically dissolved and a snap election called, with elected deputies merely serving out what remained of their four-year terms.[1]

ResultsEdit

OverallEdit

Summary of the 25 May 2003 Parliament of the Canary Islands election results
Parties and coalitions Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Total +/−
Canarian Coalition (CC)1 304,413 32.90 –4.36 23 –3
People's Party (PP) 283,186 30.61 +3.48 17 +2
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 235,234 25.42 +1.39 17 –2
Canarian Nationalist Federation (FNC) 44,703 4.83 +0.02 3 +3
The Greens of the Canaries (Verdes) 18,340 1.98 +0.52 0 ±0
Canarian United Left (IUC) 12,128 1.31 –1.43 0 ±0
Canarian Popular Alternative (APCa) 6,737 0.73 New 0 ±0
25 May Citizens' Alternative (AC25M) 2,719 0.29 New 0 ±0
Communist Party of the Canarian People (PCPC) 1,776 0.19 New 0 ±0
Humanist Party (PH) 1,322 0.14 –0.02 0 ±0
Lanzarote Assembly–PdA–PCL (AC–PdA–PCL) 964 0.10 New 0 ±0
Tenerife Union (UTI) 571 0.06 New 0 ±0
Pensionist Assembly of the Canaries (TPC) 449 0.05 –0.03 0 ±0
Party of The People (LG) 448 0.05 New 0 ±0
National Democracy (DN) 409 0.04 New 0 ±0
Centrist Union (UC) 43 0.00 –0.53 0 ±0
Blank ballots 11,806 1.28 –0.23
Total 925,248 60 ±0
Valid votes 925,248 99.44 +0.02
Invalid votes 5,201 0.56 –0.02
Votes cast / turnout 930,449 64.62 +1.88
Abstentions 509,335 35.38 –1.88
Registered voters 1,439,784
Sources[5][6][7][8]
Popular vote
CC
32.90%
PP
30.61%
PSOE
25.42%
FNC
4.83%
Verdes
1.98%
IUC
1.31%
Others
1.67%
Blank ballots
1.28%
Seats
CC
38.33%
PP
28.33%
PSOE
28.33%
FNC
5.00%

Distribution by constituencyEdit

Constituency CC PP PSOE FNC
% S % S % S % S
El Hierro 45.0 2 24.8 1 21.6 7.1
Fuerteventura 30.2 2 32.5 3 25.4 2 7.1
Gran Canaria 21.6 4 47.4 8 20.6 3 4.6
La Gomera 34.8 1 7.3 54.4 3 1.0
La Palma 50.7 4 23.4 2 23.1 2
Lanzarote 19.5 2 17.7 1 20.9 2 30.4 3
Tenerife 44.3 8 15.5 2 30.6 5 2.7
Total 32.9 23 30.6 17 25.4 17 4.8 3

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Aggregated data for CC and AHI in the 1999 election.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Statute of Autonomy of the Canary Islands of 1982". Organic Law No. 10 of 10 August 1982. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Parliament of the Canary Islands Elections Law of 2003". Law No. 7 of 20 March 2003. Official Gazette of the Canary Islands (in Spanish). Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  3. ^ a b "General Electoral System Organic Law of 1985". Organic Law No. 5 of 19 June 1985. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 28 December 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Representation of the people Institutional Act". www.juntaelectoralcentral.es. Central Electoral Commission. Retrieved 16 June 2017.
  5. ^ "Electoral Information System in the Canary Islands". www.gobiernodecanarias.org (in Spanish). Canarian Institute of Statistics. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  6. ^ "2003 Election Results". parcan.es (in Spanish). Parliament of the Canary Islands. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  7. ^ "Parliament of the Canary Islands election results, 25 May 2003" (PDF). www.juntaelectoralcentral.es (in Spanish). Electoral Commission of the Canary Islands. 24 September 2003. Retrieved 30 September 2017.
  8. ^ "Elecciones al Parlamento de Canarias (1983 - 2019)". Historia Electoral.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 30 September 2017.