1996 Sudanese general election

General elections were held in Sudan to elect a President and National Assembly between 2 and 17 March 1996. They were the first elections since 1986 due to a military coup in 1989, and the first simultaneous elections for the presidency and National Assembly. 125 members of the 400-seat National Assembly had been nominated before the election, leaving 275 seats to be elected (of which 51 were ultimately uncontested).[1][2] 900 candidates ran for the 275 seats.[2] There were no political parties at the time, and all candidates ran as independents.

1996 Sudanese general election

← 1986 2 and 17 March 1996 2000 →
  First party Second party
  Omar al-Bashir, 12th AU Summit, 090202-N-0506A-137.jpg
Leader Omar al-Bashir Abd al-Majid Sultan Kijab
Party Independent Independent
Popular vote 4,181,784 133,032
Percentage 75.68 2.4

President before election

Omar al-Bashir

Elected President

Omar al-Bashir

In the presidential election, 40 candidates ran against incumbent Omar al-Bashir, who emerged victorious with 75.4% of the vote.[3][2] Opposition groups boycotted the elections, claiming they were unfair.[2] Because of the civil war, no voting took place in 11 Southern districts.[2]

Voter turnout was reported to be 72%.[4]

ResultsEdit

PresidentEdit

CandidateVotes%
Omar al-Bashir4,181,78475.68
Abd al-Majid Sultan Kijab133,0322.41
39 other candidates1,210,46421.91
Total5,525,280100.00
Valid votes5,525,28094.58
Invalid/blank votes316,7555.42
Total votes5,842,035100.00
Registered voters/turnout8,110,65072.03
Source: Nohlen et al., African Election Database

National AssemblyEdit

PartySeats
Independents400
Total400
Source: IPU

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sudan: Elections in 1996 Inter-Parliamentary Union
  2. ^ a b c d e Shinn, David H. (2015). "Elections" (PDF). In Berry, LaVerle (ed.). Sudan : a country study (5th ed.). Washington, D.C.: Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. pp. 232–234. ISBN 978-0-8444-0750-0.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.{{cite encyclopedia}}: CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  3. ^ Dieter Nohlen, Michael Krennerich & Bernhard Thibaut (1999) Elections in Africa: A data handbook, p858 ISBN 0-19-829645-2
  4. ^ The December 2000 Presidential and Parliamentary Elections European Sudanese Public Affairs Council