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EventsEdit

DebutsEdit

ProgramsEdit

StationsEdit

  • 20 April – WLEU, Erie, Pennsylvania, begins broadcasting on 1420 kHz with 250 W power (daytime) and 100 W (night).[5]
  • 1 October – KDON, Del Monte, California, begins broadcasting on 1210 kHz with 100 W power.[6]
  • UNDATED – WTMV, East St. Louis, Illinois, begins broadcasting on 1500 kHz with 100 W power.[7]

EndingsEdit

  • 2 April – KFPM, Greenville, Texas, ends broadcast operations. The station had 15 W power, and its operator said it was "losing money every day."[8]
  • 23 June – The Gibson Family ends its run on network radio (NBC).[3]
  • 28 June – The Beatrice Lillie Show ends its run on network radio (NBC).[3]
  • 8 September – Uncle Charlie's Tent Showends its run on network radio (NBC).[3]
  • 22 September – America's Hour ends its run on network radio (CBS).[3]
  • 25 December – House of Glass ends its run on the Blue Network.[3]

BirthsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ An Encyclopedia of New Zealand 1966
  2. ^ a b Cox, Jim (2008). This Day in Network Radio: A Daily Calendar of Births, Debuts, Cancellations and Other Events in Broadcasting History. McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0-7864-3848-8.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Dunning, John. (1998). On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-507678-3.
  4. ^ "The Jumbo Fire-Chief Program - The Digital Deli Online". www.digitaldeliftp.com. Retrieved 10 May 2015.
  5. ^ "WLEU Opens at Erie" (PDF). Broadcasting. 1 May 1935. Retrieved 24 October 2014.
  6. ^ "New California Outlet" (PDF). Broadcasting. 1 October 1935. Retrieved 4 November 2014.
  7. ^ "WTMV, at East St. Louis, New 100-Watter, on Air" (PDF). Retrieved 24 October 2014.
  8. ^ "15-Watter Gives Up" (PDF). Broadcasting. 15 April 1935. Retrieved 24 October 2014.