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1927–30 Central European International Cup

The 1927–30 Central European International Cup was the first edition of the Central European International Cup and was held between September 18, 1927 and May 11, 1930.[1] The tournament's structure included a round-robin competition for the five teams involved. As the winner was to receive a Bohemian crystal cup offered by Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia Antonín Švehla, the tournament became known as the Antonín Švehla Cup.

Contents

Organizing committeeEdit

Sessions of the organizing committee took place on March 9, 1930 in Trieste and on March 11, 1930 in Budapest. The committee was composed by

EventsEdit

1927Edit

The tournament began on September 18, 1927 with the match Czechoslovakia-Austria, which ended 2–0.[2] The following week, Austria was defeated once more in Budapest, Hungary, with a score of 5–3.[3]
On October 23, in Prague, Italy's match against Czechoslovakia ended with a 2–2 draw. The last game of 1927 took place in Bologna between Italy and Austria, won 1–0 by Italy. The Austrian team complained in this occasion that the referee seemed not sufficiently impartial or fair.[4]

1928Edit

1928 opened with Italy's victory against Switzerland on January 1 in Genoa (3–2) and then, on March 25 in Rome, Italy succeeded in beating Hungary for the first time in history (4- 3). Each player on the Italian team was awarded a prize of 24,000 [Italian lira|lire]. On April 1, in Vienna, Austria lost 0–1 against Czechoslovakia;[5] on April 22, in Budapest, the Czech team lost 2–0 to Hungary.
After a break to allow Switzerland and Italy to participate in the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam, the tournament resumed in the fall: Italy beat Switzerland (3–2); Austria wins 5–1 over Hungary [6] and 2–0 over Switzerland.[7] The year ended with the victory of Hungary on Switzerland, on November 1, 3–1.

1929Edit

On March 3, 1929 Italy beat Czechoslovakia 4–2, losing 3–0 to the Austrians barely a month later, on April 7, in Vienna.[8] On April 14 Hungary beats Switzerland 5–4, and the Swiss team surrenders again to the Czechs (4–1) on 5 May. The two winning teams draw in the match (1–1) held in Prague on September 8. On October 6, Czechoslovakia beats Switzerland 5–0, and the Swiss's annus horribilis continues with a loss to Austria on October 27, on Bern's home turf.[9] At year end, with Switzerland last after losing all eight games played, Austria and Czechoslovakia are tied with 10 points at the head of the tournament, followed by Italy and Hungary with 9 points each.

1930Edit

The only game scheduled for 1930 was between Hungary and Italy. The match was played on May 11, 1930 in Budapest, and it is reported that Italy's trainer, Vittorio Pozzo brought his players to visit World War I battlefields before playing the last and decisive game of the tournament, perhaps wishing to bring back memories of their own participation, just 13 years earlier, in the fight against Austro-Hungarian soldiers. The team's crushing victory (5–0) brought Italy the first edition of the cup.[10]

MatchesEdit

City/date Match
Prague/September 18 1927   Czechoslovakia 2–0   Austria
Budapest/September 25   Hungary 5–3   Austria
Prague/October 23   Czechoslovakia 2–2   Italy
Bologna/November 6   Italy 0–1   Austria
Genoa/January 1 1928   Italy 3–2   Switzerland
Rome/March 25   Italy 4–3   Hungary
Vienna/April 1   Austria 0–1   Czechoslovakia
Budapest/April 22   Hungary 2–0   Czechoslovakia
Vienna/October 7   Austria 5–1   Hungary
Zurich/October 14   Switzerland 2–3   Italy
Vienna/October 28   Austria 2–0   Switzerland
Budapest/November 1   Hungary 3–1   Switzerland
Bologna/March 3 1929   Italy 4–2   Czechoslovakia
Vienna/April 7   Austria 3–0   Italy
Berne/April 14   Switzerland 4–5   Hungary
Lausanne/5 May   Switzerland 1–4   Czechoslovakia
Prague/September 8   Czechoslovakia 1–1   Hungary
Prague/October 6   Czechoslovakia 5–0   Switzerland
Berne/October 27   Switzerland 1–3   Austria
Budapest/11 May 1930   Hungary 0–5   Italy

Final standingsEdit

Team P Pts W D L GF GA GD
  Italy 8 11 5 1 2 21 15 +6
  Austria 8 10 5 0 3 17 10 +7
  Czechoslovakia 8 10 4 2 2 17 10 +7
  Hungary 8 9 4 1 3 20 23 −3
   Switzerland 8 0 0 0 8 11 28 −17

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.rsssf.com/tablesd/drgero1.html
  2. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 19. September 1927" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. September 19, 1927. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  3. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 26. September 1927" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. September 26, 1927. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  4. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 7. November 1927" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. November 7, 1927. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  5. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 2. April 1928" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. April 2, 1928. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  6. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 8. Oktober 1928" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. October 8, 1928. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  7. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 29. Oktober 1928" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. October 29, 1928. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  8. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 8. April 1929" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. April 8, 1929. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  9. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 28. Oktober 1929" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. October 28, 1929. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  10. ^ "Sport-Tagblatt von 12. Mai 1930" (in German). anno.onb.ac.at. May 12, 1930. Retrieved December 15, 2012.