1918 Portuguese general election

General elections were held in Portugal on 28 April 1918, following a coup by Sidónio Pais in December 1917.[1] The elections were boycotted by the Democratic Party, the Evolutionist Party and the Republican Union, who had won over 90% of the seats in the 1915 elections.[2]

1918 Portuguese presidential election

← 1915 28 April 1918 1919 →
  Sidónio Pais.jpg
Candidate Sidónio Pais
Party PNR
Popular vote 513,958
Percentage 100%

President before election

Sidónio Pais
PNR

Elected President

Sidónio Pais
PNR

1918 Portuguese legislative election

← 1915 28 April 1918 1919 →

155 seats to the Chamber of Deputies
78 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Sidónio Pais.jpg No image.png No image.png
Leader Sidónio Pais António Lino Neto
Party PNR CM CCP
Leader since 1918 1915
Last election New New 1 seat
Seats won 108 37 5
Seat change New New Increase 4

Prime Minister before election

Sidónio Pais
PNR

Prime Minister-elect

Sidónio Pais
PNR

Although they included the first direct vote election for the position of President, Pais was the only candidate and the vote was uncontested.[3] In the parliamentary elections the result was a victory for the National Republican Party, which won 108 of the 155 seats in the House of Representatives and 32 of the 73 seats in the indirectly elected Senate.[4][5]

ResultsEdit

PresidentEdit

Candidate Party Votes %
Sidónio Pais National Republican Party 513,958 100
Invalid/blank votes
Total 513,958 100
Registered voters/turnout 900,000 57.0
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

ParliamentEdit

Party House of Representatives Senate
Votes % Seats +/– Votes % Seats +/–
National Republican Party 108 New 32 New
Monarchist Cause 37 New 10 New
Catholic Centre Party 5 +4 1 0
Other parties and independents 5 –8 30 +27
Invalid/blank votes
Total 100 155 –8 513,958 100 73 +4
Registered voters/turnout 900,000 900,000 57.0
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

AftermathEdit

Pais was assassinated in Lisbon on 14 December.[3] On 16 December João do Canto e Castro was elected by parliament for a "transitional term".[1][6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1542 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1557
  3. ^ a b Nohlen & Stöver, p1563
  4. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, pp1557-1558
  5. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1543
  6. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1564

External linksEdit