Zoku-Jōmon period

The Zoku-Jōmon period (続縄文時代) (c. 340 BC–700 AD),[1] also referred to as the Epi-Jōmon period,[2] is the time in Japanese prehistory that saw the flourishing of the Zoku-Jōmon culture,[3] a continuation of Jōmon culture in northern Tōhoku and Hokkaidō that corresponds with the Yayoi period and Kofun period elsewhere.[3] Zoku-Jōmon ("continuing cord-marking")[4] in turn gave way to Satsumon ("brushed pattern"[3] or "scraped design"[5]) around the seventh century[3] or in the Nara period[6] (710–794). The "Yayoinisation" of northeast Honshū took place in the mid-Yayoi period; use of the term Zoku-Jōmon is then confined to those, in Hokkaidō, who did not "become Yayoi".[6] Despite the elements of continuity emphasised by the name, which include the continuing production of cord-marked ceramics, ongoing employment of stone technology, and non-transition to rice-based agriculture, all Yayoi hallmarks, the Zoku-Jōmon period nevertheless saw a "major break in mobility and subsistence patterns".[4]

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Barnes, Gina (2015). Archaeology of East Asia: The Rise of Civilization in China, Korea and Japan. Oxbow Books. p. 49. ISBN 978-1785700705.
  2. ^ Barnes, Gina (2015). Archaeology of East Asia: The Rise of Civilization in China, Korea and Japan. Oxbow Books. p. 479. ISBN 978-1785700705.
  3. ^ a b c d Batten, Bruce Loyd (2003). To the Ends of Japan: Premodern Frontiers, Boundaries, and Interactions. University of Hawai'i Press. p. 74. ISBN 978-0824824471.
  4. ^ a b Rocek, Thomas R.; Bar-Yosef, Ofer, eds. (1998). Seasonality and Sedentism: Archaeological Perspectives from Old and New World Sites. Harvard University Press. p. 124. ISBN 978-0873659567.
  5. ^ Utagawa Hiroshi (1992). "The "Sending-Back" Rite in Ainu Culture inn the seventh century". Japanese Journal of Religious Studies. Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture. 19 (2–3): 259. doi:10.18874/jjrs.19.2-3.1992.255-270.
  6. ^ a b Barnes, Gina (2015). Archaeology of East Asia: The Rise of Civilization in China, Korea and Japan. Oxbow Books. p. 283. ISBN 978-1785700705.