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Women's World Chess Championship 2012

The Women's World Chess Championship 2012 was a knockout tournament, to decide the women's world champion.[1] The title was won by Anna Ushenina of Ukraine for the first time.[2] Defending champion Hou Yifan went out in the second round.

Women's World Chess Championship 2012
Anna Ushenina
Anna Ushenina, winner of the 2012 championship.
VenueYugra Chess Academy
LocationKhanty Mansiysk, Russia
Dates10 November – 1 December 2012
Competitors64
Champion
Ukraine Anna Ushenina
← 2011
2013 →

The tournament was played as a 64-player knockout type in Khanty Mansiysk, Russia, from 10 November to 1 December 2012. Each pairing consisted of two games, and tie-breaks at faster time controls, if necessary.

After only two wins by lower rated players in the first round, the second round saw the top three seeds all going out to players rated 150 Elo points below them, of those third seed Anna Muzychuk lost to the eventual world champion.[3] The fourth seed went out in the quarter-final. The final consisted of four games at classical time control, followed by tie-break games; in it Anna Ushenina beat former women's world champion Antoaneta Stefanova in the first set of tie-breaks. The unexpected final of two lower seeded players raised questions, if a single match knock-out system is the best way to determine the world champion.[4]

Ushenina lost her title in the Women's World Chess Championship 2013, after game seven of a ten-game match against Hou Yifan, winner of the FIDE Women's Grand Prix 2011–2012.

Contents

ParticipantsEdit

Players qualified to the tournament through the previous world championship, the FIDE rating list, continental championships and two FIDE president nominees. Players were seeded by their Elo ratings (November 2012 list),[5] except that defending champion Hou Yifan was the no. 1 seed.[6]

  1.   Hou Yifan (China), 2606, GM (WC)
  2.   Humpy Koneru (India), 2610, GM (WC)
  3.   Anna Muzychuk (Slovenia), 2586, GM (J10)
  4.   Zhao Xue (China), 2565, GM (WC)
  5.   Kateryna Lahno (Ukraine), 2553, GM (E11)
  6.   Nadezhda Kosintseva (Russia), 2539, GM (E10)
  7.   Viktorija Cmilyte (Lithuania), 2524, GM (E10)
  8.   Marie Sebag (France), 2521, GM (E10)
  9.   Valentina Gunina (Russia), 2517, IM (R)
  10.   Pia Cramling (Sweden), 2516, GM (E10)
  11.   Tatiana Kosintseva (Russia), 2515, GM (E10)
  12.   Dronavalli Harika (India), 2512, GM (AS11)
  13.   Bela Khotenashvili (Georgia), 2504, IM (E11)
  14.   Alexandra Kosteniuk (Russia), 2501, GM (R)
  15.   Ju Wenjun (China), 2501, WGM (Z3.5)
  16.   Antoaneta Stefanova (Bulgaria), 2491, GM (E10)
  17.   Zhu Chen (Qatar), 2491, GM (R)
  18.   Anna Zatonskih (United States), 2489, IM (Z2.1)
  19.   Natalia Pogonina (Russia), 2478, WGM (E11)
  20.   Mariya Muzychuk (Ukraine), 2476, IM (E10)
  21.   Elina Danielian (Armenia), 2476, GM (E11)
  22.   Hoang Thanh Trang (HUN), 2470, GM (E11)
  23.   Irina Krush (United States), 2470, IM (Z2.1)
  24.   Alisa Galliamova (Russia), 2468, IM (R)
  25.   Olga Girya (Russia), 2467, WGM (PN)
  26.   Huang Qian (China), 2465, WGM (Z3.5)
  27.   Lilit Mkrtchian (Armenia), 2457, IM (E11)
  28.   Lela Javakhishvili (Georgia), 2455, IM (E11)
  29.   Yelena Dembo (Greece), 2454, IM (E10)
  30.   Anna Ushenina (Ukraine), 2452, IM (R)
  31.   Natalia Zhukova (Ukraine), 2451, GM (E10)
  32.   Monika Socko (Poland), 2445, GM (E10)
  33.   Almira Skripchenko (France), 2441, IM (R)
  34.   Guo Qi (China), 2432, WGM (PN)
  35.   Deysi Cori (Peru), 2429, WGM (J11)
  36.   Nino Khurtsidze (Georgia), 2428, IM (E10)
  37.   Anastasia Bodnaruk (Russia), 2415, IM (E11)
  38.   Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant (Scotland), 2414, GM (E11)
  39.   Shen Yang (China), 2413, WGM (Z3.5)
  40.   Iweta Rajlich (Poland), 2410, IM (E10)
  41.   Ekaterina Kovalevskaya (Russia), 2409, IM (E10)
  42.   Li Ruofan (SIN), 2394, IM (Z3.3)
  43.   Evgenija Ovod (Russia), 2384, IM (E11)
  44.   Sopiko Khukhashvili (Georgia), 2383, IM (E11)
  45.   Cristina Adela Foisor (Romania), 2383, IM (E11)
  46.   Svetlana Matveeva (Russia), 2377, IM (E11)
  47.   Carolina Lujan (Argentina), 2369, IM (Z2.5)
  48.   Nastassia Ziaziulkina (Belarus), 2367, WGM (E10)
  49.   Marina Romanko (Russia), 2355, IM (E11)
  50.   Atousa Pourkashiyan (Iran), 2321, WGM (AS10)
  51.   Tatev Abrahamyan (United States), 2304, WGM (Z2.1)
  52.   Maritza Arribas Robaina (Cuba), 2273, WGM (AM)
  53.   Soumya Swaminathan (India), 2251, WGM (Z3.7)
  54.   Madina Davletbayeva (Kazakhstan), 2220, WIM (Z3.4)
  55.   Shayesteh Ghader Pour (Iran), 2219, WIM (Z3.1)
  56.   Gu Xiaobing (China), 2209, WGM (Z3.5)
  57.   Irina Berezina (Australia), 2190, IM (Z3.6)
  58.   Ingrid Aliaga Fernandez (Peru), 2175, WFM (Z2.4)
  59.   Melissa Castrillon Gomez (Colombia), 2159, WIM (Z2.3)
  60.   Mona Khaled (Egypt), 2155, WGM (AF)
  61.   Natalia Khoudgarian (Canada), 2138, WIM (Z2.2)
  62.   Amina Mezioud (Algeria), 2055, WIM (AF)
  63.   Denise Frick (South Africa), 1871, WIM (AF)
  64.   S D Ranasinghe (Sri Lanka), 1821, WIM (Z3.2)

Qualification pathsEdit

Notable non-participantsEdit

The number one woman in the world, Judit Polgár, has never competed for the women's title and did not enter this time either. Other notable absentees were: women's number six Nana Dzagnidze, 2010 finalist Ruan Lufei, and ex-champion Maia Chiburdanidze (inactive).

FormatEdit

Each pairing consisted of two games played over two days, one with white and one with black. The time controls in the classical games were 90 minutes for the first 40 moves with a 30-minute addition on move 41. In case of a tie, tiebreaks were played the next day. The format for the tie breaks was as follows:[1]

  • Two rapid games (25 minutes plus 10 second increment) were played.
  • If the score was still tied, two rapid games (10 minutes plus 10 second increment) were played.
  • If the match is tied after these two games, the opponents played two blitz games (5 minutes plus 3-second increment).
  • If the score was still tied after pair of blitz games, a single Armageddon game (white must win, black only needs to draw) would be played. White had 5 minutes, black had 4 minutes, and both players had three-second increments beginning with move 61.

Prize poolEdit

The championship had a prize-pool of 450,000 US-Dollar. Prizes were $3,750 for first round losers, $5,500 for the second round, 8,000 for the third. Losing quarter-finalists picked up $12,000, the semi-finalists $20,000. Stefanova then got $30,000 for finishing runner-up to Ushenina, who got $60,000 prize money. It was the same distribution as in the 2010 knock-out championship.

CoverageEdit

 
Antoaneta Stefanova, losing finalist

The tournament was streamed on the tournament website each day in full length. Live coverage was interrupted only for advertising breaks. The videostream was also playable on demand until the next day started. Coverage was provided in low and high definition with Grand Master commentary in three languages: English, Russian and for the first time Chinese. In the final days the broadcast was watched by several hundred thousand live viewers.[7]

ResultsEdit

Final matchEdit

The final match was decided after four matches at classical time controls and two rapid tie-breaks. Anna Ushenina won the title, beating 2004 Women's World Chess champion Stefanova. Stefanova also was the reigning Women's World Rapid champion.[8]

Women's World Chess Championship Final 2012
Rating 1 2 3 4 R1 R2 Total
  Antoaneta Stefanova (Bulgaria) 2491 ½ ½ 0 1 ½ 0
  Anna Ushenina (Ukraine) 2452 ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 1

BracketEdit

First round pairings were published on 1 November 2012.[9]

1st Round 2nd Round 3rd Round Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
                  
1   Hou Yifan 2
64   S Ranasinghe 0
1   Hou Yifan 1
32   M Socko 3
33   M Socko
32   A Skripchenko ½
32   M Socko 0
16   A Stefanova 2
17   A Stefanova 2
48   M Romanko 0
16   A Stefanova
17   Zhu Chen ½
49   Zhu Chen 2
16   N Ziaziulkina 0
16   A Stefanova 3
8   M Sebag 1
9   M Sebag
56   I Berezina ½
8   M Sebag
25   O Girya ½
41   O Girya
24   I Rajlich ½
8   M Sebag 2
24   A Galliamova 0
25   V Gunina 2
40   Gu XB 0
9   V Gunina ½
24   A Galliamova
57   A Galliamova 3
8   E Kovalevskaya 1
16   A Stefanova
12   D Harika ½
5   Zhao Xue 2
60   N Khoudgarian 0
4   Zhao Xue
36   N Khurtsidze
37   Y Dembo ½
28   N Khurtsidze
4   Zhao Xue
20   M Muzychuk ½
21   B Khotenashvili
44   M Arribas R
52   M Arribas R ½
20   M Muzychuk
53   M Muzychuk[10]
12   C A Foisor
4   Zhao Xue
12   D Harika
13   K Lahno 2
52   M Khaled 0
5   K Lahno ½
28   L Javakhishvili
45   L Javakhishvili
20   A Bodnaruk
28   L Javakhishvili ½
12   D Harika
29   D Harika
36   S Soumya ½
12   D Harika
21   E Danielian ½
61   E Danielian 4
4   S Khukhashvili 2
16   A Stefanova
30   A Ushenina
3   A Muzychuk 2
62   A Mezioud 0
3   A Muzychuk 1
30   A Ushenina 3
35   A Ushenina
30   D Cori ½
30   A Ushenina
19   N Pogonina ½
19   N Pogonina 3
46   S Matveeva 1
19   N Pogonina
14   A Kosteniuk ½
51   A Kosteniuk
14   T Abrahamyan ½
30   A Ushenina
6   N Kosintseva ½
11   N Kosintseva 2
54   M Castrillon G 0
6   N Kosintseva
27   L Mkrtchian
43   L Mkrtchian 2
22   K Arakhamia-G 0
6   N Kosintseva
11   T Kosintseva
27   Hoang T T
38   E Ovod ½
22   Hoang T T ½
11   T Kosintseva
59   M Davletbayeva ½
6   T Kosintseva
30   A Ushenina
15   Ju Wenjun
7   V Cmilyte
58   I Aliaga F ½
7   V Cmilyte ½
26   Huang Q
39   Huang Q
26   Shen Yang ½
26   Huang Q
23   I Krush
23   Li Ruofan
42   I Krush
23   I Krush 3
10   P Cramling 1
55   S Ghader Pour 0
10   P Cramling 2
26   Huang Q
15   Ju Wenjun
15   Ju Wenjun 4
50   A Pourkashiyan 2
15   Ju Wenjun 4
18   A Zatonskih 2
47   C Lujan ½
18   A Zatonskih
15   Ju Wenjun
31   N Zhukova
31   N Zhukova
34   Guo Qi ½
31   N Zhukova 2
2   H Koneru 0
63   D Frick 0
2   H Koneru 2

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Women's World Chess Championship regulations" (PDF). FIDE. Retrieved 25 November 2011.
  2. ^ "Kharkiv native becomes Ukraine's first women's world chess champion". kyivpost.com. 1 December 2012. Retrieved 1 December 2012.
  3. ^ "Favourites fall at the Women's World Championship round two". Chessbase.com. 16 November 2012. Retrieved 3 December 2012.
  4. ^ Dylan Loeb McClain (1 December 2012). "Underdog Takes Women's World Title". New York Times. Retrieved 3 December 2012.
  5. ^ Top 100 Women November 2012
  6. ^ Participants of FIDE World women's chess championship 2012
  7. ^ "Mark Glukhovsky: Women players are very beautiful". chess2012.ugrasport.com. 30 November 2012. Retrieved 3 December 2012.
  8. ^ "Stefanova Wins Women's World Rapid Championship". chess.com. 6 March 2012. Retrieved 3 December 2012.
  9. ^ Pairings, Participants and Schedule of the WWCC 2012
  10. ^ Played black in armageddon game

External linksEdit