William W. Mercer

William Walter "Bill" Mercer (born 1964) is an American attorney and politician serving as a member of the Montana House of Representatives from the 46th district.[1] He previously served as the United States Attorney for the District of Montana, as well as principal associate deputy attorney general for the United States Department of Justice.[2] Mercer was nominated by President George W. Bush as Associate Attorney General and served in the position in an acting capacity, but resigned before his confirmation hearing could take place.[3]

Bill Mercer
William W. Mercer.jpg
Member of the Montana House of Representatives
from the 46th district
Assumed office
January 7, 2019
United States Associate Attorney General
Acting
In office
2006–2007
PresidentGeorge W. Bush
Preceded byRobert McCallum Jr.
Succeeded byGregory G. Katsas (acting)
United States Attorney for the District of Montana
In office
2001–2009
PresidentGeorge W. Bush
Succeeded byMichael W. Cotter
Personal details
Born1964 (age 56–57)
Billings, Montana, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Marci Mercer
Children2
EducationUniversity of Montana (BA)
George Mason University (JD)
Harvard University (MPA)

Early life and educationEdit

Mercer was born in Billings, Montana. He received his Juris Doctor degree from George Mason University, Master of Public Administration from Harvard University, and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Montana.[1][4]

CareerEdit

From 1994 to April 2001, Mercer served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Montana. On April 20, 2001, he was nominated by President George W. Bush to serve as the United States Attorney for the District of Montana.[5][6]

While remaining as the U.S. Attorney, Mercer served as principal associate deputy attorney general in the United States Department of Justice from 2005 to 2006.[1] He later served as the acting United States Associate Attorney General starting in 2006, though resigned on June 22, 2007, in light of the dismissal of U.S. attorneys by the Bush administration. While some have alleged that Mercer was involved in the dismissal, there is no evidence that he was involved.[3]

During his tenure as U.S. Attorney, he helped create Project Safe Childhood, a Department of Justice initiative which actively combats technology-facilitated child sexual exploitation and child pornography.[7] The project continues to coordinate with local, state, tribal, and non-governmental agencies and organizations to protect the safety and well-being of American children.[8]

In the Montana House of Representatives, Mercer chairs the House Judicial Committee, Law Enforcement and Justice Committee, and serves as a member on the House Appropriations Committee.[9]

Electoral historyEdit

Mercer first announced his candidacy to the Montana House of Representatives in 2018. He won the 2018 General Election with 59.2% of the vote.[10] In 2020, he successfully won his reelection bid, receiving 67.7% of the vote in the general election.[11]

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Copper Book: Lawmakers of Montana, Legislative Session of 2021". Montana State Legislature. Montana Legislative Services Division. p. 51. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  2. ^ "Deputy Attorney General James B. Comey announces Appointment of Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General" (Press release). United States Department of Justice. 2005-05-09. Retrieved 2008-11-16.
  3. ^ a b Schmitt, Richard. "One man's charmed life at Justice". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  4. ^ justfacts.votesmart.org Retrieved September 2, 2020
  5. ^ "Bill Mercer HD 46, Republican". Billings Gazette. Billings Gazette. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  6. ^ "William Mercer". The Federalist Society. The Federalist Society. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  7. ^ Bryon, Eve. "Mercer made big impact as chief US Attorney". Independent Record. Independent Record. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  8. ^ "About Project Safe Childhood". U.S. Department of Justice. U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  9. ^ "House of Representatives Committeess 2021" (PDF). Montana Legislature. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  10. ^ "2018 Legislative General Election Canvass" (PDF). Montana Secretary of State. Montana Secretary of State. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  11. ^ "2020 Legislative General Election Canvass" (PDF). Montana Secretary of State. Montana Secretary of State. Retrieved 27 April 2021.