Wellard railway station

Wellard railway station is a railway station in Wellard, a suburb of Perth, Western Australia. It is on the Mandurah railway line, which is part of the Transperth commuter rail network, and is located at the centre of a transit oriented development. It has two side platforms located in a cutting, accessed by a ground-level station concourse. Services run every 10 minutes during peak, and every 15 minutes between peak. The journey to Perth railway station is 37.1 kilometres (23.1 mi), and takes 30 minutes. The station has a bus interchange with four bus stands, and three regular bus routes.

Wellard
Wellard Station, August 2021 03.jpg
Station in August 2021
LocationChiswick Parade, Charing Cross, Wellard
Western Australia
Australia
Coordinates32°15′50″S 115°49′01″E / 32.263919°S 115.817074°E / -32.263919; 115.817074Coordinates: 32°15′50″S 115°49′01″E / 32.263919°S 115.817074°E / -32.263919; 115.817074
Owned byPublic Transport Authority
Operated byTransperth Train Operations
Line(s)     Mandurah line
Distance37.1 kilometres from Perth
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks2
Bus routes3
Bus stands4
Construction
Structure typeGround
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Station codeRWD
99691 (platform 1)
99692 (platform 2)
Fare zone4
History
Opened23 December 2007
ElectrifiedYes
Passengers
2013–14363,790
Services
Preceding station Transperth Transperth Following station
Kwinana
towards Perth
Mandurah line
All
Rockingham
towards Mandurah
Mandurah line
K
Rockingham
Terminus

The station was known as Leda station during planning. The station was designed by Woodhead International Architects and MPS Architects. Construction of the station by Doric Constructions and Brierty Contractors started in late 2005. The station was complete by January 2007, and was opened on 23 December 2007, along with the rest of the Mandurah line.

DescriptionEdit

Wellard railway station is in Wellard, Western Australia, a suburb of Perth. The station is 37.1 kilometres (23.1 mi),[1] or a 30-minute train journey, from Perth railway station.[2] The adjacent stations are Kwinana railway station towards Perth, and Rockingham railway station towards Mandurah.[2][3]

The station consists of two side platforms situated in a cutting below ground level. The platforms are approximately 150 metres (490 ft) long, or long enough for a Transperth 6 car train – the longest trains used by Transperth. At ground level is a concourse which can be used to cross over the railway or access the station's platforms. There is one escalator, one lift, and one set of stairs to each platform. On the station concourse is a kiosk, a customer service office, fare gates, and toilets. The station is fully accessible. At the north-western entrance to the station is a bus interchange with four bus stands. At the south-eastern entrance to the station is a car park with 297 car bays, and 15 motorcycle bays.[3][4][5]: 303 

HistoryEdit

 
Southbound view in August 2021

The station was known as Leda station during planning, named after the nearby suburb of Leda. In March 1999, the Government of Western Australia released the South West Metropolitan Railway Master Plan. It laid out the route of and stations along the proposed railway between Perth and Mandurah. Leda station was one of the stations included in the plan.[6] The station had a projected number of daily boardings of 1,030.[7]: 19 

In August 2002, the government released a new master plan, after a change in the railway's route south from Perth, and through Rockingham. Leda station was removed from the list of stations proposed to be built initially, relegated to being a future prospect.[7] At some point after that plan was released, it was decided to build Leda station along with the rest of the line initially.

For the construction of the railway to Mandurah, among other rail projects in Perth, New MetroRail was set up as a division of the Public Transport Authority.[8] The design and construction of the Mandurah railway line was split up into eight "packages". Among the things that were part of Package A was the bulk earthworks for several stations on the line, including Wellard station.[9] The $310 million contract for Package A was awarded to a joint venture between John Holland, MacMahon Contractors, and Multiplex Constructions Pty Ltd on 23 May 2004.[5]: 301 

The actual construction of Wellard station, along with Cockburn Central station and Kwinana station, was part of Package B. The designer for Package B was Woodhead International Architects and MPS Architects.[5]: 301  The design contract was awarded to them in April 2002, at a cost of $2.1 million.[10] Expressions of interest for the construction of Package B opened in September 2003.[11] The contract for the construction of Package B was awarded to the consortium of Doric Constructions and Brierty Contractors in March 2005, at a cost of $32 million.[12][13] Construction on the station began in late 2005.[14] By January 2007, the station was complete and handed over to the Public Transport Authority.[15] Wellard station opened along with the rest of the Mandurah line on 23 December 2007.[16]

Transit-oriented developmentEdit

The station is at the heart of an award-winning transit-oriented development scheme known as The Village at Wellard. Its design that incorporates parks, walkability, and rail proximity has earned it awards from the Urban Development Institute of Western Australia, Planning Institute Australia, Landscape Industries Association, and HIA Land-Corp.[17] The development contains low- and medium-density residential development, as well as over 57 ha (0.22 sq mi) of parkland and conservation areas.[18]

ServicesEdit

Wellard railway station is served by the Mandurah railway line on the Transperth network. These services are operated by Transperth Train Operations, a division of the Public Transport Authority.[19] The line goes between Mandurah railway station and Perth railway station, continuing north from there as the Joondalup railway line. Mandurah line trains stop at the station every 10 minutes during peak on weekdays, and every 15 minutes during the day outside peak every day of the year except Christmas Day. At night, trains are half-hourly, or hourly. All services stop at all stations, except for the once-per-day K pattern, which runs early in the morning each direction, terminating and commencing at Rockingham station.[2] The station saw 363,790 boardings in the 2013–14 financial year, making it the least used station on the Mandurah line.[20]

Wellard station platforms
Stop Platform Line Stopping pattern Destination Notes
99691 1 Mandurah All stations, K Perth Underground
99692 2 Mandurah All stations, K Mandurah

Wellard station has a bus interchange with four bus stands.[4] Bus services are operated by Transdev WA under contract.[21]

Stop Route Destination / description Notes
Stand 1 541 to Kwinana station via Sulphur Road & Leda[22]
909 Rail replacement service to Perth station
Stand 2 542 to Kwinana station via Chisham Avenue & Calista[23]
909 Rail replacement service to Mandurah station
Stand 3 544 to Kwinana station via Lambeth Circle & Johnson Road[24]
Stand 4 Set down only

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Manual – Rail Access" (PDF). Public Transport Authority. 30 August 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 September 2021. Retrieved 20 September 2021.
  2. ^ a b c "Mandurah Line Train Timetable" (PDF). Transperth. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Wellard Station". Transperth. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  4. ^ a b "Wellard Station – Access Map" (PDF). Transperth. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  5. ^ a b c Longhurst, Derek (2008). 48 months, 48 minutes : building the Perth to Mandurah railway. West Perth, Western Australia: Rawlhouse Publishing. ISBN 9780958740685.
  6. ^ "South West Metropolitan Railway Master Plan: Executive Overview" (PDF). New MetroRail. March 1999. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  7. ^ a b "Perth Urban Rail Development Project – Supplementary Master Plan" (PDF). Transperth. August 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 March 2003. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  8. ^ "What is New MetroRail?". New MetroRail. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  9. ^ "OnTrack: July 2003" (PDF). New MetroRail. July 2003. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 August 2007. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  10. ^ "OnTrack: March 2003" (PDF). New MetroRail. March 2003. p. 6. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  11. ^ "Construction interest sought for about $80m worth of stations on Perth to Mandurah railway". Media Statements. 2 September 2003. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  12. ^ "OnTrack: April 2005" (PDF). New MetroRail. April 2005. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  13. ^ "Contract awarded for three more New MetroRail stations". Media Statements. 24 March 2005. Retrieved 1 October 2021.
  14. ^ "Wellard". New MetroRail. Archived from the original on 13 March 2007.
  15. ^ "Project Timeline". New MetroRail. Archived from the original on 29 August 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  16. ^ "All aboard as the new Perth-to-Mandurah Railway begins". Media Statements. 23 December 2007. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  17. ^ "News and events". The Village at Wellard. Archived from the original on 14 September 2009. Retrieved 1 May 2009.
  18. ^ "Estate features". The Village at Wellard. Archived from the original on 2 March 2009. Retrieved 21 May 2009.
  19. ^ "Transperth". Public Transport Authority. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  20. ^ "Question On Notice No. 4245 asked in the Legislative Assembly on 25 June 2015 by Mr M. Mcgowan". Parliament of Western Australia. 11 August 2015. Retrieved 21 October 2021.
  21. ^ "About Transperth". Transperth. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  22. ^ "Route 541". Bus Timetable 124 (PDF). Transperth. n.d. [effective from 21 July 2019].
  23. ^ "Route 542". Bus Timetable 124 (PDF). Transperth. n.d. [effective from 21 July 2019].
  24. ^ Bus Route 544 Timetable. Transperth.

External linksEdit