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Washington University Bears football

The Washington University Bears football team represents Washington University in St. Louis in college football. The team competes at the NCAA Division III level as an affiliate member of the College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW). They are a primary member of the University Athletic Association, of which they were a founding member. They were previously a founding member of the Missouri Valley Conference whose bigger schools split into the Big Eight Conference and then added a few members to form the Big 12 Conference.[3]

Washington University Bears
Washington University Bears primary athletic logo.png
First season1887
Athletic directorAnthony J. Azama
Head coachLarry Kindbom
31st season, 185–116–0 (.615)
StadiumFrancis Field
(Capacity: 3,300)
Year built1903
Field surfaceFieldTurf
LocationSt. Louis, Missouri
NCAA divisionDivision III
ConferenceCollege Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin
All-time record546–494–33 (.524)
Playoff appearances3 (Div. III)
1999, 2013, 2016
Playoff record0–3 (Div. III)
Conference titles19
RivalriesChicago Maroons[1]
Consensus All-Americans55
ColorsRed and Green[2]
         
Fight songFight for Washington
Marching bandWashU Pep Band
OutfitterAdidas
Websitebearsports.wustl.edu

The school's first football team was fielded in 1887. The team plays its home games at the 3,300 seat Francis Field. Francis Field was site of the 1904 Summer Olympics. All of Washington's games in 1904 were at home and served as the home site for American football at the Summer Olympics as a demonstration programme along with Purdue-Missouri and Carlisle-Haskell games.

Former Washington University Bears football player and head coach Jimmy Conzelman is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[4] Another former head coach, Weeb Ewbank, later coach of AFL, NFL, and Super Bowl champion teams is also in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[5]

Two former Washington University head coaches have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Bob Higgins in 1954[6] and Carl Snavely in 1965.[7]

Two former Washington University players have also been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame: Harvey Jablonsky in 1978[8] and Shelby Jordan in 2013.[9] Both Jablonsky and Jordan were All-Americans. Jordan went on to win Super Bowl XVIII with the Los Angeles Raiders.

Former Bears linebacker Brandon Roberts won the Vincent dePaul Draddy Trophy from the National Football Foundation as the nation's top football student-athlete in 2002. Roberts is the only non-FBS recipient of the award.[10]

Contents

HistoryEdit

Conference membershipsEdit

Years Conference
1887–1906 Independent
1907–1942 Missouri Valley Conference
1943–1946 No team
1947–1962 Independent
1963–1971 College Athletic Conference
1972–1987 Independent
1988–2017 University Athletic Association[11]
2015–2016 Southern Athletic Association
2018–present College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin

SeasonsEdit

Year Head Coach Conference Overall Record Conference Record
1887 Unknown 1–0
1888 Unknown 1–0
1889 Arthur L. Tuttle (player-coach) 1–0
1890 Arthur L. Tuttle (player-coach) 2–0
1891 Arthur L. Tuttle (player-coach) 4–1–1
1892 Arthur L. Tuttle (player-coach) 3–2
1893 Unknown 1–1
1894 Unknown 2–1
1895 Unknown 2–0
1896 Unknown 0–2
1897 Unknown 0–2
1898 Edwin W. Lee 6–0
1899 Arthur N. Sager 5–1–0
1900 Edwin W. Lee 3–2–1
1901 Gordon Clarke 5–3–1
1902 Hugh White 2–6–1
1903 L. W. Boynton 4–4–2
1904 L. W. Boynton 4–7
1905 Charles A. Fairweather 7–3–2
1906 J. Merrill Blanchard 2–2–2
1907 J. Merrill Blanchard MVC 1–5–1 0–1
1908 Francis M. Cayou MVC 4–4–1 0–2
1909 Francis M. Cayou MVC 3–4 0–2
1910 Francis M. Cayou MVC 3–4 0–2
1911 Francis M. Cayou MVC 4–2–2 0–0–2
1912 Francis M. Cayou MVC 4–4 0–2
1913 William P. Edmunds MVC 1–5 0–4
1914 William P. Edmunds MVC 2–2–1 0–1–1
1915 William P. Edmunds MVC 3–2 1–1
1916 William P. Edmunds MVC 3–3–1 0–2
1917 R. B. Rutherford MVC 4–3 1–2
1918 R. B. Rutherford MVC 6–0 — (WWI)
1919 R. B. Rutherford MVC 5–2 2–2
1920 George Rider MVC 4–4 1–4
1921 George Rider MVC 4–3–1 2–3
1922 George Rider MVC 1–5–1 0–5–1
1923 Byron Wimberly MVC 3–5 1–4
1924 Byron Wimberly MVC 4–4 0–4
1925 Bob Higgins MVC 2–5–1 1–4–1
1926 Bob Higgins MVC 1–7 0–6
1927 Bob Higgins MVC 5–2–2 2–2–1
1928 Al Sharpe MVC 2–5–1 0–2
1929 Al Sharpe MVC 3–4–1 0–1–1
1930 Al Sharpe MVC 4–2–2 2–2
1931 Al Sharpe MVC 2–7 0–3
1932 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 4–4 1–2
1933 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 4–5 1–2
1934 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 7–3 1–0†
1935 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 6–4 3–0‡
1936 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 3–7 1–1
1937 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 4–6 2–2
1938 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 6–3–1 2–1–1
1939 Jimmy Conzelman MVC 6–3–1 4–1†
1940 Frank Loebs MVC 3–6 1–3
1941 Frank Loebs MVC 4–5 1–3
1942 Tom Gorman MVC 5–5 2–3
1943 No Football
1944 No Football
1945 No Football
1946 No Football
1947 Weeb Ewbank 5–3
1948 Weeb Ewbank 9–1
1949 Irv Utz 7–2
1950 Irv Utz 2–7
1951 Irv Utz 5–4
1952 Irv Utz 4–5
1953 Carl Snavely 7–2
1954 Carl Snavely 6–3
1955 Carl Snavely 5–4
1956 Carl Snavely 6–3
1957 Carl Snavely 5–3
1958 Carl Snavely 4–4
1959 Lynn Hovland 1–7
1960 Lynn Hovland 2–7
1961 Lynn Hovland 0–9
1962 Dave Puddington 5–3
1963 Dave Puddington CAC 6–2–1 1–1
1964 Dave Puddington CAC 6–3–1 3–1‡
1965 Dave Puddington CAC 7–2 3–1
1966 Dave Puddington CAC 7–2 4–0†
1967 Dave Puddington CAC 5–4–1 2–2
1968 Dick Martin CAC 2–8 0–4
1969 Dick Martin CAC 2–7 1–3
1970 Dick Martin CAC 5–4 3–1‡
1971 Dick Martin CAC 4–5 1–3
1972 Don McCright 6–3
1973 Don McCright 6–2–1
1974 Don McCright 5–4
1975 Don McCright 4–5
1976 Don McCright 3–6
1977 Chris Gianoulakis 5–4
1978 Chris Gianoulakis 5–4
1979 Chris Gianoulakis 2–7
1980 Ken Henderson 2–7
1981 Ken Henderson 2–7
1982 Ken Henderson 2–7
1983 Fred Remmy 2–6–1
1984 Fred Remmy 4–5
1985 Fred Remmy 3–7
1986 Fred Remmy 2–7
1987 Ken Woody 1–8
1988 Ken Woody UAA 2–8 1–3
1989 Larry Kindbom UAA 4–5 2–2
1990 Larry Kindbom UAA 7–3 2–2
1991 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 1–3
1992 Larry Kindbom UAA 4–6 1–3
1993 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 1–3
1994 Larry Kindbom UAA 7–3 3–1‡
1995 Larry Kindbom UAA 9–1 3–1‡
1996 Larry Kindbom UAA 7–3 3–1‡
1997 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 3–1
1998 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 2–2
1999 Larry Kindbom UAA 8–3 4–0†*
2000 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 3–1
2001 Larry Kindbom UAA 8–2 4–0†
2002 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 4–0†
2003 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 4–0†
2004 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 3–0†
2005 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 2–1
2006 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 2–1
2007 Larry Kindbom UAA 7–3 1–2
2008 Larry Kindbom UAA 5–5 1–2
2009 Larry Kindbom UAA 4–6 1–2
2010 Larry Kindbom UAA 7–3 2–1
2011 Larry Kindbom UAA 6–4 2–1
2012 Larry Kindbom UAA 5–5 3–0†
2013 Larry Kindbom UAA 8–3 3–0†*
2014 Larry Kindbom UAA 4–6 1–2
2015 Larry Kindbom SAA / UAA 6–4 5–3 / 2–1‡
2016 Larry Kindbom SAA / UAA 8–3 7–1‡ / 2–1‡*
2017 Larry Kindbom UAA 3–6 0–2
2018 Larry Kindbom CCIW 8–2 7–2

†- Conference champions ‡- Conference co-champions *- Playoff Appearance [12]

NFL Draft Picks[13][14]Edit


1937 — 9th Round, 3rd Pick, 83rd Overall — Chicago CardinalsDwight HafeliEnd[15]
1938 — 3rd Round, 2nd Pick, 17th Overall — Philadelphia EaglesJoe BukantFB[16]
1942 — 3rd Round, 4th Pick, 19th Overall — Chicago CardinalsBud SchwenkQB[17]
1950 — 21st Round, 12th Pick, 273rd Overall — Cleveland Browns — Leroy Vogts — G[18]
1955 — 20th Round, 1st Pick, 230th Overall — Chicago Cardinals — Jim Burst — HB[19]
1973 — 7th Round, 1st Pick, 157th Overall — Houston OilersShelby JordanT[20]

All-AmericansEdit


1929 — Harvey Jablonsky
1933 — Glynn Clark (AP Honorable Mention)
1934 — Harry Brown (AP Honorable Mention)
1935 — Bob Hudgens (AAB Honorable Mention, NEA Honorable Mention); Joe Bukant (AP Honorable Mention)
1936 — Dwight Hafeli (AP Honorable Mention)
1937 — Raymond Hobbs (Colliers)
1941 — Wilson “Bud” Schwenk (AP Honorable Mention)
1956 — Ed Lind (AP Honorable Mention, Little All-America First Team)
1957 — Ed Lind (AP Honorable Mention, Little All-America Honorable Mention); Don Polkinghorne (Little All-America First Team)
1960 — Paul Isham (AP Little All-America Honorable Mention)
1962 — Paul Isham (AP Honorable Mention)
1963 — Arnie Edwards (AP Honorable Mention)
1964 — James Powers (AP Honorable Mention)
1970 — James Marx (AP Honorable Mention)
1971 — Stu Watkins (AP Little All-America Honorable Mention)
1972 — Shelby Jordan (Kodak First Team); Stu Watkins (AP Little All-America Honorable Mention)
1973 — Stu Watkins (Kodak First Team)
1974 — Marion Stallings (Kodak First Team)
1981 — Dave Bolton (Sporting News Honorable Mention)
1988 — Paul Matthews (Kodak First Team, AP Little AllAmerica Second Team, Pizza Hut Third Team, Football Gazette Honorable Mention)
1989 — Eric Nyhus (Pizza Hut First Team, Football Gazette Second Team); Stacey Hightower (Football Gazette Honorable Mention, Pizza Hut Honorable Mention)
1990 — Eric Nyhus (Football Gazette Second Team)
1991 — Michael Lauber (Champion U.S.A. Second Team, Football Gazette Third Team); Jeff Doyle (Football Gazette Third Team); Aaron Keen (Football Gazette Honorable Mention)
1992 — Michael Lauber (Champion U.S.A. Honorable Mention, Football Gazette Honorable Mention)
1993 — Jeff Doyle (Champion U.S.A. Third Team, Football Gazette Second Team); Aaron Keen (Football Gazette Honorable Mention)
1994 — Matt Gomric (Division III First Team, Football Gazette First Team)
1995 — Chris Nalley (Hewlett-Packard First Team, Football Gazette Second Team, American Football Quarterly First Team); Josh Haza (Hewlett-Packard Honorable Mention)
1996 — Chris Nalley (Hewlett-Packard First Team, Foot- ball Gazette First Team, American Football Quarterly First Team); Joe El-Etr (Hewlett-Packard Second Team, Football Gazette Second Team), Aaron Boehm (HewlettPackard Third Team).
1997 — Joe El-Etr (Hewlett-Packard Second Team), Brad Klein (Hewlett-Packard Second Team, Football Gazette Second Team).
1999 — Tim Runnalls (Hewlett-Packard First Team, Football Gazette Lineman of the Year and First Team, Burger King Coaches’ Association First Team, AFCA Aztec Bowl selection, D3football.com Second Team), Kevin Dym (D3football.com Third Team)
2000 — James Molnar (D3football.com Second Team), Jonathan Feig (D3football.com Third Team)
2001 — James Molnar (Hewlett-Packard Honorable Mention)
2003 — Rick Schmitz (CoSIDA Third Team)
2005 — Joe Rizzo (Associated Press Little Second Team, Football Gazette Second Team, D3football.com Honorable Mention), Brad Duesing (Football Gazette Honorable Mention)
2006 — Drew Wethington (Football Gazette Third Team)
2010 — Brandon Brown (D3football.com First Team)
2015 — Alex Hallwachs (D3football.com Third Team), Quincy Marting (D3football.com Honorable Mention)
2016 — Matt Page (AFCA First Team, D3football.com Second Team), Kevin Hammarlund (AFCA Second Team, D3football.com Honorable Mention)
2017 — Johnny Davidson (D3football.com Third Team)
2018 — Hank Michalski (AFCA Second Team) [21]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Washington University in St. Louis Football Record Book (PDF), retrieved May 23, 2019
  2. ^ "Color Palettes". Retrieved August 3, 2016.
  3. ^ Big Eight Conference Football Championship History, retrieved May 23, 2019
  4. ^ "Jimmy Conzelman – Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site".
  5. ^ "Weeb Ewbank – Pro Football Hall of Fame Official Site".
  6. ^ Bob Higgins – NFF Hall of Fame, retrieved May 23, 2019
  7. ^ Carl Snavely – NFF Hall of Fame, retrieved May 20, 2019
  8. ^ Harvey Jablonsky – NFF Hall of Fame, retrieved May 23, 2019
  9. ^ Shelby Jordan – NFF Hall of Fame, retrieved May 23, 2019
  10. ^ William V. Campbell Trophy® Recipients, retrieved May 20, 2019
  11. ^ UAA Football composite results (PDF), retrieved May 20, 2019
  12. ^ "2017 Washington University Football Record Book" (PDF). Retrieved Apr 9, 2017.
  13. ^ NFL Draft History — Washington St. Louis, retrieved May 23, 2019
  14. ^ DraftHistory.com Colleges Beginning with W, retrieved May 26, 2019
  15. ^ "Los Angeles Seeks Berth in National Grid League", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO, p. 56, December 13, 1936
  16. ^ "Detroit Draws Clint Frank, Pittsburgh Gets White in Draft; Bukant to Eagles", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO, p. 17, December 12, 1937
  17. ^ "Schwenk, Drafted by Cardinals, Does Not Intend to Join Pros", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO, p. 9, December 23, 1941
  18. ^ "Four St. Louis Area Athletes Picked in Pro Football Draft", St. Louis Star-Times, St. Louis, MO, p. 16, January 23, 1950
  19. ^ "Four Mizzou Men Selected in Draft, But One is a Junior", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO, p. 22, January 28, 1955
  20. ^ "Bears' Jordan Picked by Oilers", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, MO, p. 58, January 31, 1973
  21. ^ Washington University in St. Louis Football Record Book (PDF), retrieved May 20, 2019

External linksEdit