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State Route 106 (SR 106) is a Washington state highway in Mason County, extending 20.09 miles (32.33 km) from U.S. Route 101 (US 101) in Skokomish to SR 3 south of Belfair. The road was once a section of State Road 21 in 1915, which later became State Road 14 in 1923 and Primary State Highway 14 (PSH 14) in 1937 and PSH 21 in 1955. PSH 21 became SR 106 in 1964 and since, the Washington State Department of Transportation has arranged and completed minor projects to improve the roadway.

State Route 106 marker

State Route 106
SR 106 highlighted in red.
Route information
Auxiliary route of US 101
Defined by RCW 47.17.185
Maintained by WSDOT
Length20.09 mi[2] (32.33 km)
Existed1964[1]–present
Major junctions
West end US 101 in Skokomish
East end SR 3 near Belfair
Location
CountiesMason
Highway system
SR 105SR 107

Contents

Route descriptionEdit

State Route 106 (SR 106) begins at a 3-way junction with U.S. Route 101 (US 101) in the census-designated place (CDP) of Skokomish, located north of Shelton. From the intersection, the road travels southeast to bridge Skobob Creek and curve north along the Skokomish River and Annas Bay to the community of Union. After passing Union, the highway continues along the southern shoreline of Hood Canal past Twanoh State Park to intersect SR 3 south of Belfair.[3] The roadway approaching the SR 3 intersection near Belfair was used by 6,100 motorists daily in 2007 based on average annual daily traffic (AADT) data collected by the Washington State Department of Transportation;[4] AADT data from 1970 shows that 2,000 motorists used the same section of SR 106 daily.[5]

HistoryEdit

    
Before SR 106 was established in 1964, two older highways, PSH 14 (1937–1955, left) and PSH 21 (1955–1964, right) used the current route of the highway.

The first state-maintained highway on the current route of SR 106 was State Road 21, established in 1915 by the Washington State Legislature and Department of Highways and ran from Skokomish to Kingston.[6][7] State Road 21 later became State Road 14, named the Navy Yard Highway, in a 1923 renumbering.[8] During the creation of the Primary and secondary highways, State Road 14 became Primary State Highway 14 (PSH 14) in 1937.[9] The Skokomish–Gorst section of PSH 14 was later added to PSH 21 in 1955.[10] The 1964 highway renumbering divided PSH 21 into SR 106,[1] SR 3 and SR 104.[11]

Recently, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has arranged and completed some minor construction projects along the SR 106 corridor. The first project replaced a culvert over Skobob Creek with a bridge;[12] the project was completed in December 2005 and was located 0.85 miles (1.37 km) east of Skokomish.[2][12][13] Later in 2007, WSDOT installed a traffic signal at the SR 106 / SR 3 intersection south of Belfair.[14] The signal was tested on May 11 and the project concluded in July.[15]

Major intersectionsEdit

The entire route is in Mason County.

Locationmi[2]kmDestinationsNotes
Skokomish0.0000.000  US 101 – Olympia, Port Angeles, Aberdeen
20.0932.33  SR 3 – Belfair, Shelton, Bremerton
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

ReferencesEdit

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata
  1. ^ a b Washington State Legislature (1970). "RCW 47.17.185: State route No. 106". Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  2. ^ a b c Washington State Department of Transportation (2006). "State Highway Log: Planning Report, SR 2 to SR 971" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on June 16, 2010. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  3. ^ Google (June 12, 2009). "State Route 106" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  4. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2007). "2007 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 26, 2009. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  5. ^ Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways (1970). "Annual Traffic Report, 1970" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. p. 125. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 25, 2008. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  6. ^ State Roads Established By Legislature of 1915 (PDF) (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 1915. p. pg. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 6, 2005. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  7. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 19, 1915). "Chapter 64: Classification of Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1915 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 491. Retrieved June 12, 2009. A secondary state highway is established as follows: State road No. 21: This road shall begin at Kingston, thence by the most feasible route through Port Gamble, Poulsbo and Bremerton to a connection with the Olympic Highway between Shelton and Hoodsport in Mason county.
  8. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 19, 1923). "Chapter 185: Primary and Secondary Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1923 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 631. Retrieved June 12, 2009. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 14 or the Navy Yard Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at a junction with State Road No. 9, at the most feasible point between Shelton and Potlatch in Mason County; thence by the most feasible route through Union City and Clifton to Charleston in Kitsap County; also from a junction near Tidewater Creek in Kitsap County through Port Orchard, to Gig Harbor in Pierce County; also from a junction near Port Orchard by the most feasible route to the ferry landing at Harper.
  9. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 18, 1937). "Chapter 190: Establishment of Primary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 1001. Retrieved June 12, 2009. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 14, or the Navy Yard Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 9, in the vicinity north of Shelton, thence in a northeasterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Port Orchard, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route to Gig Harbor; also beginning in the vicinity of Port Orchard on Primary State Highway No. 14, as herein described, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to the ferry landing at Harper.
  10. ^ Washington State Legislature (1955). "Chapter 83". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1955 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature.
  11. ^ C. G. Prahl (December 1, 1965). "Identification of State Highways" (PDF). Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. p. 12. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  12. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (2005). "SR 106 - Skobob Creek Fish Passage - Complete December 2005". Archived from the original on September 29, 2008. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  13. ^ SR 106, Skobob Creek Fish Passage Map (Map). Washington State Department of Transportation. 2005. Archived from the original on July 8, 2008. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  14. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2007). "SR 3 - SR 106 South Belfair Signal - Complete July 2007". Archived from the original on March 5, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2009.
  15. ^ Bushe, Steve; Swift, Jamie (May 11, 2007). "Delays Expected During Belfair Signal Testing". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 12, 2009.[dead link]

External linksEdit