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List of former state routes in Washington

Since the 1964 state highway renumbering, which established the current state route system, the Washington State Department of Transportation has decommissioned thirty state routes. Once a highway has been decommissioned, the highway is turned over to the local county or city that it resided in, who is then responsible for all maintenance on the former highway. All former highways are codified in Washington law under the Revised Code of Washington, chapter 47.17, section 420.

System information
NotesDefined by RCW 47.17.420
Highway names
InterstatesInterstate X (I-X)
US HighwaysU.S. Route X (US X)
StateState Route X (SR x)
System links

State Route 30Edit

 

State Route 30
LocationTonasket – Kettle Falls
Existed1970–1973

State Route 95Edit

 

U.S. Route 95
Location
Existed1970–1979

State Route 110Edit

 

State Route 110
Location
Existed1970–1975

State Route 111 TemporaryEdit

 

 

State Route 111 Temporary
Location
Existed1970–1971

State Route 111 was a state highway in the U.S. state of Washington, running from Hurricane Ridge in the Olympic National Park to US 101.

State Route 113Edit

 

State Route 113
Location
Existed1970–1973

The portion of Washington State Route 20 within Jefferson and Island Counties was once known as SR 113.

State Route 126Edit

 

State Route 126
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

SR 126 was a state route in the U.S. state of Washington. It was an auxiliary route of US 12. It started at US 12 (at Dayton), then headed east to US 12 again (near Pomeroy), where it ended. In January 1964, SSH 3L became SR 126. SR 126 was dropped out of the system in 1992 because it was mostly very steep and unpaved. The approximate route follows Patit Road, Hartstock Grade Road, Tucannon Road, Blind Grade Road, Linville Gulch Road, and Tatman Mountain Road.

State Route 131Edit

 

State Route 131
Location
Existed1970–1975

SR 131 was a section of what is now known as US 97, north of Ellensburg.

State Route 140Edit

 

State Route 140
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 143Edit

 

State Route 143
Location
Existed1973–1985

State Route 151Edit

 

State Route 151
Location
Existed1970–1987

State Route 209Edit

 

State Route 209
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 209 was a state route in the U.S. state of Washington. It was an auxiliary route of U.S. Route 2. It started at SR 207 in Lake Wenatchee State Park and went east to the community of Plain and then south to U.S. Route 2 near Leavenworth. In January 1964, SSH 15C became SR 209 and SR 207. SR 209 was removed in 1992.

State Route 220Edit

 

State Route 220
Location220
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 232Edit

 

State Route 232
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 232 was a state route in the U.S. state of Washington. It was an auxiliary route of State Route 23. It started at SR 231 and went east to U.S. Route 395. In 1967, SSH 3U became SR 232. SR 232 was later removed in 1992.

State Route 237Edit

 

State Route 237
Location
Existed1975–April 1, 1992

State Route 251Edit

 

State Route 251
Location
Existed1970–1983

State Route 294Edit

 

State Route 294
Location
Existed1970–1973

State Route 306Edit

 

State Route 306
Location
Existed1970–1993

State Route 306 was a state route in the U.S. state of Washington. It was an auxiliary route of State Route 3. It started at SR 303 and went east to Illahee State Park. In 1964, part of SSH 21B became SR 306. SR 306 was later removed in 1993.

State Route 311Edit

 

State Route 311
Location
Existed1970–1973

State Route 402Edit

 

State Route 402
Location
Existed1970–1971

State Route 403Edit

 

State Route 403
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 407Edit

 

State Route 407
LocationWahkiakum County, Washington
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 407 was an auxiliary route of SR 4 that connected Cathlament to Elochoman State Forest. It was previously designated as SSH 12D prior to the 1964 renumbering and was removed as a state highway in 1992.[1]

State Route 431Edit

 

State Route 431
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 431 was a state route in the U.S. state of Washington. It was an auxiliary route of State Route 4. It started at SR 4 and went north to I-5. In 1964, a branch of PSH 12 became SR 831. SR 831 was an auxiliary route of U.S. Route 830 and the route was switched to the current designation of SR 4 in 1967. SR 431 was later removed in 1992.

State Route 514Edit

 

State Route 514
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

SR 514 was a state route in the U.S. state of Washington. It was an auxiliary route of Interstate 5. It started at SR 99 in Fife, then headed east to SR 161, where it ended in Milton. In January 1964, SSH 1X became SR 514. On April 1, 1992, SR 514 became defunct.

State Route 537Edit

 

State Route 537
Location
Existed1970–1975

State Route 540Edit

 

State Route 540
Location
Existed1970–1974

SR 540 was a state route in the U.S. state of Washington. It was an auxiliary route of Interstate 5. It started at the Lummi Indian Reservation, then headed east to I-5, where it ended. In January 1964, SSH 1Z became SR 540. In 1984, SR 540 became defunct.

State Route 603Edit

 

State Route 603
Location
Existed1970–April 1, 1992

State Route 901Edit

 

State Route 901
Location
Existed1970–1992

SR 901 was created in 1964 from Secondary State Highway 2D. At the time of its creation, SR 901 began at the intersection of Lake Washington Boulevard and State Route 520, on the border of Kirkland and Bellevue. It then traveled north along Lake Washington Blvd. to downtown Kirkland. At the intersection of Lake St. and Central Way, SR 901 turned right, traveling east along Central Way. It then continued as Redmond Way into Redmond turning south onto West Lake Sammamish Parkway when the roads intersected. It then followed West Lake Sammamish Parkway into Issaquah, ending at its intersection with State Route 900. SR 901 also had a spur leading from West Lake Sammamish Parkway into downtown Redmond along Redmond Way.

In 1971, SR 901 was broken into two parts. The western part, from SR 520 to the intersection of Redmond Way and West Lake Sammamish Parkway (including the spur into Redmond), was renamed State Route 908. The remainder retained the SR 901 designation, with one exception; West Lake Sammamish Parkway lost its state route designation from Exit 13 of Interstate 90 to its intersection with SR 900.

Effective April 1, 1992, SR 901's path was changed again; now it ran through the city of Sammamish along East Lake Sammamish Parkway from Front Street in Issaquah to State Route 202 east of downtown Redmond. In June, SR 901 was completely dropped as a state route in Washington.

State Route 908Edit

 

State Route 908
LocationKirkland – Redmond[2]
Existed1971–2010

State Route 920Edit

 

State Route 920
LocationRedmond
Existed1975–1985

State Route 920 (SR 920) was the temporary designation for a section of SR 520 bypassing downtown Redmond. It was created in 1975 and opened in July 1977, connecting SR 901 to SR 202.[3][4] Four years after the missing link in SR 520 was completed in 1981,[5] SR 920 was deleted from the state highway system.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Highways of Washington State. "Highways of Washington State". Retrieved May 17, 2008.
  2. ^ Kirkland Quadragle (Map). 1:24000. 7.5 minute series (topographic). United States Department of the Interior Geological Survey. March 2, 1976.
  3. ^ "Chapter 63: State Highways—Route Designations" (PDF). Session Laws of the State of Washington, 1975. Washington State Legislature. April 5, 1975. p. 131. Retrieved August 8, 2018.
  4. ^ "New Redmond bypass will open tomorrow". The Seattle Times. July 14, 1977. p. D5.
  5. ^ Case, Rebecca (December 18, 1981). "Redmond 520 link opens today". Journal-American. Bellevue, Washington. p. A1.
  6. ^ "Chapter 177: State Highways Routes Revised" (PDF). Session Laws of the State of Washington, 1985. Washington State Legislature. April 25, 1985. p. 674. Retrieved August 8, 2018.

External linksEdit