Venise Chan

Venise Chan (Chinese: 陳詠悠; born 30 May 1989) is a former tennis player from Hong Kong. Chan, who reached No. 1 in Hong Kong and world No. 340 in WTA rankings during her career, also played college tennis for the University of Washington.

Venise Chan
Chinese: 陳詠悠
Born (1989-05-30) 30 May 1989 (age 32)
Other namesWing-Yau Venise Chan
Alma materUniversity of Washington, University of Cambridge
OccupationTennis player, Risk & Compliance

Tennis career
Country (sports) Hong Kong
CoachJill Hetherington
Prize money$38,293
Singles
Career record124–66
Career titles6 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 340 (15 October 2012)
Doubles
Career record18–37
Career titles2 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 516 (15 April 2013)
Team competitions
Fed Cup16–6

Early lifeEdit

Chan was born in Hong Kong.[1] Chan graduated from the University of Washington in 2011 with a Bachelor of Business Administration and earned a Master's in Philosophy from Cambridge University in 2014. She currently resides in Hong Kong and works in finance.

Tennis careerEdit

At age 12 years 318 days, Chan became the youngest female since Paulette Moreno in 1977 to contest a Ladies' Open singles final in Hong Kong when she reached the title decider at the 2002 Hong Kong National Tennis Championships.[2] She made her debut for the Hong Kong Fed Cup team in 2006, and has a 16–6 record. She won her sixth career pro circuit title at the $10,000 Sharm El Sheikh F4 in Egypt (June 2012).

In her career, she won six women's singles and two doubles titles on the ITF Women's Circuit.[3] She reached a career-high WTA ranking of No. 340 in singles and No. 516 in doubles.[4] She is also the youngest player from Hong Kong (16 years and 5 months) to lift a women's singles title and the only one to do so on her pro circuit debut.[5]

Chan represented Hong Kong at the World University Games (2011), Asian Games (2010), All China Games (2009 and 2013), Asian Championships (2007), and Fed Cup (2006-2007 and 2012-2013).[6]

Moreover, Chan is 13-3 in Fed Cup singles, placing her third among all Hong Kong representatives under the Most Singles Wins category.[7]

In 2005 and 2011, Chan was nominated for the Hong Kong Sports Stars Awards, an annual Sports Federation & Olympic Committee of Hong Kong, China annual event.[8]

While at the University of Washington, Chan reached a career-high NCAA Division I ranking of No. 9 in singles and No. 6 in doubles. In addition, she earned two All-Americas in singles (2010 and 2011) and one for doubles (2011).[1] Chan is the only player from Hong Kong besides Patricia Hy (UCLA) to attain Division I All-America in singles on the US collegiate circuit. She also received the All-Pac-10 First Team nomination in 2009 and 2010, and was the lone recipient of the Pac-10 Scholar Athlete of the Year Award in 2011.[1] During her sophomore year, she swept all the No. 1 players from UC Berkeley (Jana Juricova), Stanford (Hilary Barte), UCLA (Yasmin Schnack), and USC (Sarah Fansler) in the same regular season.[9] In addition, she is the only player from Hong Kong to compete in the main draw of the women's singles at the NCAA D1 Championships four years in a row (2008-2011).[9]

Following Chan's final collegiate home game, then Washingoton Huskies Head Coach Jill Hetherington,[10] herself a former WTA No. 6 in doubles said, "Venise was one of the best players to come out of the University of Washington. I remember thinking that when she came, she was going to break a lot of records. I was very lucky to get Venise to come here, as our team was struggling, and she was the anchor that turned our program around. She competed with all the best players in the country and had wins over many of them. She is going to be missed."[11]

In 2014, Chan competed in the Seabright Cup, a biennial international match that pits an Oxford & Cambridge team against a combined Harvard and & Yale side. She is also the only player from Hong Kong to earn a selection to the Seabright Cup.

As a junior, she reached a career-high ranking of No. 24 in the world. She competed in all four Junior Grand Slams ‒ Australian Open, Roland Garros, Wimbledon, and US Open.[3] She also captured the Hong Kong National Junior Tennis Championships in the under-12, under-14, under-16, and under-18 age groups.[11]

Locally, she has captured all three local majors, lifting the women's singles title at the Hong Kong National Tennis Championships in 2004, SCAA Open in 2003 and 2004, and CRC Open in 2005, 2011, and 2016.[12]

Personal lifeEdit

Chan is fluent in Cantonese, Mandarin, English, and some Japanese.[13]

In 2017, Chan became a Business Compliance and Operation Risks Officer in Private Banking at Bank of China. In 2018, she became a Business Compliance Manager in Private Banking at Bank of China. Since 2019 onwards, she has worked in an Asset Management company in Hong Kong.[13]

ITF finalsEdit

Singles: 9 (6–3)Edit

Legend
$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Finals by surface
Hard (6–3)
Clay (0–0)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 13 November 2005 ITF Manila, Philippines Hard   Czarina-Mae Arevalo 6–1, 6–4
Runner-up 1. 20 November 2005 ITF Manila, Philippines Hard   Riza Zalameda 3–6, 2–6
Winner 2. 23 July 2006 ITF Bangkok, Thailand Hard   Ayu-Fani Damayanti 6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 2. 5 October 2006 ITF Jakarta, Indonesia Hard   Sandy Gumulya 3–6, 0–6
Runner-up 3. 23 August 2008 ITF Khon Kaen, Thailand Hard   Lu Jiajing 3–6, 4–6
Winner 3. 11 September 2011 ITF Yeongwol, South Korea Hard   Yue Yuan 6–2, 6–3
Winner 4. 12 February 2011 ITF Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt Hard   Lynn Schonhage 7–5, 1–6, 6–1
Winner 5. 24 June 2012 ITF Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt Hard   Ekaterina Yashina 6–7(5), 6–3, 6–4
Winner 6. 6 October 2012 ITF Bidar, India Hard   Yumi Miyazaki 6–2, 6–3

Doubles: 2 (2–0)Edit

Legend
$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Finals by surface
Hard (2–0)
Clay (0–0)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 8 July 2012 ITF Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt Hard   Anna Morgina   Magy Aziz
  Mora Eshak
6–1, 6–2
Winner 2. 27 October 2012 ITF Seoul, South Korea Hard   Nigina Abduraimova   Kim Ji-young
  Yoo Mi
6–4, 2–6, [12–10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Women's Tennis Roster - Venise Chan". University of Washington Athletics. Retrieved March 24, 2019.(2007 to 2011 University of Washington)
  2. ^ "Venise Chan 陳詠悠". Hong Kong Tennis Association. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Venise Chan." Archived 2018-04-27 at the Wayback Machine International Tennis Federation. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  4. ^ "Venise Chan." Archived 2020-12-15 at the Wayback Machine Women's Tennis Association. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  5. ^ Yanne, Andy. "Destination Washington - Venise all set to battle Pac-10's best." Hong Kong Tennis Association, 20 August 2007. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  6. ^ Hong Kong Tennis Association Annual Report (2006, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013)
  7. ^ "Venise Chan." Archived 2020-12-15 at the Wayback Machine FedCup. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  8. ^ Yanne, Andy. "Hong Kong Sports Stars Awards 2011." Hong Kong Tennis Association, 16 January 2012. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  9. ^ a b "Made in Hong Kong: Venise Chan garners All-America honours." Hong Kong Tennis Association, 24 July 2010. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  10. ^ "Jill Hetherington." Archived 2020-12-15 at the Wayback Machine Women's Tennis Association. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Venise Chan concludes collegiate career as three-time All-American." Hong Kong Tennis Association, 16 June 2011. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  12. ^ Hong Kong Tennis Association Annual Report (2003, 2004, 2005, 2011, 2016)
  13. ^ a b "Venise Chan". LinkedIn.com. Retrieved March 24, 2019.

External linksEdit