Urodacus elongatus

Urodacus elongatus, commonly known as the Flinders Range scorpion, is a species of scorpion belonging to the family Urodacidae. They are endemic to the Flinders Ranges of South Australia. They were described by L.E. Koch in 1977.[1]

Flinders Range scorpion
Urodacus elongatus (24328138827).jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Subfamily:
Genus:
Species:
U. elongatus
Binomial name
Urodacus elongatus
L.E. Koch, 1977[1]

Flinders Range scorpions are sexually dimorphic. The males are generally slimmer but overall larger with longer tail segments, which is where they get their name ‘Elongatus’. Females are generally smaller than the males but more robust with shorter tail segments. They are one of the largest species of scorpion in Australia, with males growing up to 12cm from mouth to tip of stinger and females up to 10cm.[2] They can live up to 8-10 years in the wild or in captivity.[3] In the wild they live in shallow scrapes constructed under rocks.[4]

They are commonly sold in specialty pet shops and are sought after due to their large size in comparison to other commercially available scorpions. They are an observational pet and are not intended to be handled as they will inflict a painful venomous sting when threatened. However no known scorpion species in Australia possesses a venom which is fatal to humans, and the Flinders Range scorpion is no exception. Stings from this species do not usually require medical attention.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (12 February 2010). "Species Urodacus elongatus L.E. Koch, 1977". Australian Biological Resources Study: Australian Faunal Directory. Commonwealth of Australia. Retrieved 19 April 2014.
  2. ^ "Flinders Ranges Scorpion" (PDF). Government of South Australia: Department for Environment and Water. Retrieved October 3, 2022.
  3. ^ "Flinders Ranges Scorpion - The Animal Facts - Appearance, Diet, Habitat". The Animal Facts. Retrieved 2022-10-03.
  4. ^ a b "A guide to the scorpions of Australia". Australian Geographic. 2016-05-26. Retrieved 2022-10-03.