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1956 United States presidential election in New York

The 1956 United States presidential election in New York took place on November 6, 1956. All contemporary 48 states were part of the 1956 United States presidential election. New York voters chose forty five electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president.

1956 United States presidential election in New York

← 1952 November 6, 1956 1960 →
Turnout67.9%[1] Decrease 3.3 pp
  Dwight David Eisenhower, photo portrait by Bachrach, 1952.jpg AdlaiEStevenson1900-1965.jpg
Nominee Dwight D. Eisenhower Adlai Stevenson
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Pennsylvania[a][2] Illinois
Running mate Richard Nixon Estes Kefauver
Electoral vote 45 0
Popular vote 4,340,340 2,750,769
Percentage 61.2% 38.8%

New york presidential results 1956.svg
County Results
  Stevenson—50-60%
  Eisenhower—50-60%
  Eisenhower—60-70%
  Eisenhower—70-80%
  Eisenhower—80-90%

President before election

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican

Elected President

Dwight D. Eisenhower
Republican

New York was won by incumbent Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was running against former Democratic Governor of Illinois Adlai Stevenson. Eisenhower ran with incumbent Vice President Richard Nixon, and Stevenson ran with Tennessee Senator, and principal opponent during the 1956 Democratic Primaries, Estes Kefauver.

Eisenhower received 61.19% of the vote to Stevenson's 38.78%, a margin of 22.41%.

New York weighed in for this election as 4% more Republican than the national average. This election was very much of a re-match from the previous presidential election four years earlier, which featured approximately the same major candidates. The presidential election of 1956 was a very partisan election for New York, with 99.8% of the electorate voting for either the Democratic Party or the Republican Party.[3] The widely popular Eisenhower took every county in the State of New York outside of New York City, dominating upstate by landslide margins and also sweeping suburban areas around NYC. Stevenson narrowly won New York City overall by carrying the boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the Bronx, while Eisenhower won Queens and Staten Island.

Eisenhower won the election in New York by a 22-point sweep-out landslide. The presidential election of 1956 is one of the final years in American politics with a Civil War Democratic stronghold in the Deep South. This was also one of the first elections in New York (and nationally) where most campaign finance went to television ads.[4] Stevenson campaigned on a platform of expansion of government social programs founded under former President Franklin D. Roosevelt, scaling back the Cold War with the Soviet Union, and ending the U.S. draft, seeking an 'all volunteer armed forces.' [5] While Stevenson's policies were largely popular with many people living in the United States at the time, Eisenhower's post World War II star-power and strong stance against peace-talks with the Soviet Union, won him a landslide victory across the United States, including in New York.

Eisenhower had first won election to the White House in 1952 as a war hero, a political outsider, and a moderate Republican who pledged to protect and support popular New Deal Democratic policies, finally ending 20 years of Democratic control of the White House. Once in office, Eisenhower governed as a moderate progressive, approving infrastructure spending projects like the Interstate Highway System and supporting high tax rates on the rich, as well as taking a progressive stand on issues related to the Civil Rights Movement. Thus Eisenhower was able to win over many more normally Democratic-leaning liberal and moderate voters in the Northeast than he already had in 1952, and thus every Northeastern state swung in his favor in 1956, including New York.

1956 was the last election in which a Republican presidential candidate took more than 60% of the vote in New York State, as well as the last election in which New York State was more Republican than the national average.[6]

Contents

ResultsEdit

1956 United States presidential election in New York
Party Candidate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower 4,340,340 61.19% 45
Democratic Adlai Stevenson 2,458,212 34.66%
Liberal Adlai Stevenson 292,557 4.12%
Total Adlai Stevenson 2,750,769 38.78% 0
Write-ins 1,751 0.02% 0
Totals 7,092,860 100.0% 45

Results by CountyEdit

Counties Region Stevenson Eisenhower Ind Oth TOT MV MV%
Albany Capitol 65,982 86,202 9 152,193 20,220 13.29%
Allegany Western 3,668 16,068 19,736 12,400 62.83%
Bronx NYC 343,823 257,382 383 601,588 (86,441) -14.37%
Broome Southern 23,217 67,024 90,241 43,807 48.54%
Cattaraugus Western 9,613 25,282 34,895 15,669 44.90%
Cayuga Central 10,268 26,503 4 36,775 16,235 44.15%
Chautauqua Western 20,269 44,149 14 64,432 23,880 37.06%
Chemung Southern 11,592 33,270 44,862 21,678 48.32%
Chenango Southern 3,804 16,314 20,118 12,510 62.18%
Clinton North C. 6,833 16,295 2 23,130 9,462 40.91%
Columbia Capitol 4,999 19,004 24,003 14,005 58.35%
Cortland Central 3,612 14,085 17,697 10,473 59.18%
Delaware Southern 3,835 17,364 21,199 13,529 63.82%
Dutchess Hudson V. 14,876 53,840 8 68,724 38,964 56.70%
Erie Western 166,930 292,657 62 459,649 125,727 27.35%
Essex North C. 3,035 13,930 16,965 10,895 64.22%
Franklin North C. 5,226 13,003 18,229 7,777 42.66%
Fulton Mohawk V. 6,352 18,244 24,596 11,892 48.35%
Genesee Finger L. 5,986 17,614 23,600 11,628 49.27%
Greene Capitol 3,811 14,262 18,073 10,451 57.83%
Hamilton North C. 470 2,619 3,089 2,149 69.57%
Herkimer Mohawk V. 8,789 22,246 31,035 13,457 43.36%
Jefferson North C. 9,959 28,429 1 38,389 18,470 48.11%
Kings NYC 557,655 460,456 368 1,018,479 (97,199) -9.54%
Lewis North C. 2,536 7,764 10,300 5,228 50.76%
Livingston Finger L. 4,989 15,523 1 20,513 10,534 51.35%
Madison Central 4,903 18,555 4 23,462 13,652 58.19%
Monroe Finger L. 91,161 183,747 23 274,931 92,586 33.68%
Montgomery Mohawk V. 9,996 20,678 11 30,685 10,682 34.81%
Nassau Long Is. 166,646 372,358 459 539,463 205,712 38.13%
New York NYC 377,856 300,004 457 678,317 (77,852) -11.48%
Niagara Western 30,161 62,433 92,594 32,272 34.85%
Oneida Mohawk V. 34,649 80,178 114,827 45,529 39.65%
Onondaga Central 49,918 137,852 187,770 87,934 46.83%
Ontario Finger L. 7,719 22,317 5 30,041 14,598 48.59%
Orange Hudson V. 16,722 57,739 29 74,490 41,017 55.06%
Orleans Finger L. 3,464 11,895 15,359 8,431 54.89%
Oswego Central 8,809 29,277 38,086 20,468 53.74%
Otsego Mohawk V. 5,644 19,484 25,128 13,840 55.08%
Putnam Hudson V. 4,694 12,898 13 17,605 8,204 46.60%
Queens NYC 318,723 466,057 144 784,924 147,334 18.77%
Rensselaer Capitol 20,516 55,186 75,702 34,670 45.80%
Richmond NYC 19,644 64,233 59 83,936 44,589 53.12%
Rockland Hudson V. 13,881 34,049 10 47,940 20,168 42.07%
Saratoga Capitol 9,338 32,522 6 41,866 23,184 55.38%
Schenectady Capitol 21,673 58,540 22 80,235 36,867 45.95%
Schoharie Mohawk V. 3,227 8,851 12,078 5,624 46.56%
Schuyler Southern 1,613 5,795 7,408 4,182 56.45%
Seneca Finger L. 3,623 10,417 14,040 6,794 48.39%
St. Lawrence North C. 10,892 31,897 42,789 21,005 49.09%
Steuben Southern 9,440 33,902 43,342 24,462 56.44%
Suffolk Long Is. 48,323 167,805 104 216,232 119,482 55.26%
Sullivan Hudson V. 8,937 15,845 24,782 6,908 27.88%
Tioga Southern 3,188 11,958 3 15,149 8,770 57.89%
Tompkins Central 5,475 19,749 25,224 14,274 56.59%
Ulster Hudson V. 13,321 43,034 5 56,360 29,713 52.72%
Warren Capitol 3,897 17,852 21,749 13,955 64.16%
Washington Capitol 4,817 18,449 23,266 13,632 58.59%
Wayne Finger L. 5,910 22,940 28,850 17,030 59.03%
Westchester Hudson V. 104,857 271,906 315 377,078 167,049 44.30%
Wyoming Finger L. 3,397 12,499 15,896 9,102 57.26%
Yates Finger L. 1,606 7,910 9,516 6,304 66.25%
TOTALS 2,750,769 4,340,340 0 2,521 7,093,630 1,589,571 22.41%

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bicentennial Edition: Historical Statistics of the United States, Colonial Times to 1970, part 2, p. 1072.
  2. ^ "The Presidents". David Leip. Retrieved September 27, 2017. Eisenhower's home state for the 1956 Election was Pennsylvania
  3. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2013-07-14.
  4. ^ Emmet John Hughes, "52,000,000 TV Sets-How Many Votes?" The New York Times, September 25, 1960, SM23
  5. ^ John Lewis Gaddis, The Cold War: A New History (2006) pp 129-30
  6. ^ Counting the Votes; New York

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Although he was born in Texas and grew up in Kansas before his military career, at the time of the 1952 election Eisenhower was president of Columbia University and was, officially, a resident of New York. During his first term as president, he moved his private residence to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and officially changed his residency to Pennsylvania.