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1818 and 1819 United States Senate elections

The United States Senate elections of 1818 and 1819 were elections for the United States Senate that had the Democratic-Republican Party gain two seats. The Federalists had only three seats being contested, of which they lost two and the third was left vacant due to a failure to elect.

1818 and 1819 United States Senate elections

← 1816/17 Dates vary by state 1820/21 →

14 of the 42 seats in the United States Senate (plus special elections)
22 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic-Republican Federalist
Last election 25 seats 13 seats
Seats before 28 12
Seats won 14 0
Seats after 30 9
Seat change Increase 3 Decrease 3
Seats up 11 3

Majority party before election

Democratic-Republican

Elected Majority party

Democratic-Republican

As these elections were prior to ratification of the seventeenth amendment, Senators were chosen by State legislatures.

Results summaryEdit

Senate Party Division, 16th Congress (1819–1821)

  • Majority Party: Democratic-Republican (30–37)
  • Minority Party: Federalist (9)
  • Vacant: 3–0
  • Total Seats: 42–46

Change in compositionEdit

Before the electionsEdit

After the admission of Illinois.

  DR1
DR11 DR10 DR9 DR8 DR7 DR6 DR5 DR4 DR3
Ill.
New seat
DR2
DR12 DR13 DR14 DR15 DR16 DR17 DR18 DR19 DR20
Ill.
Ran
DR21
Ind.
Ran
Majority → DR22
N.C.
Ran
F12
N.Y.
Ran
DR30
Vt.
Resigned
DR29
Pa.
Retired
DR28
Ohio
Retired
DR27
La.
Retired
DR26
N.H.
Unknown
DR25
Ky.
Unknown
DR24
Ga.
Unknown
DR23
S.C.
Ran
F11
Md.
Ran
F10
Conn.
Ran
F9 F8 F7 F6 F5 F4 F3 F2
  F1

Result of the general electionsEdit

  DR1
DR11 DR10 DR9 DR8 DR7 DR6 DR5 DR4 DR3 DR2
DR12 DR13 DR14 DR15 DR16 DR17 DR18 DR19 DR20
Ill.
Re-elected
DR21
Ind.
Re-elected
Majority → DR22
N.C.
Re-elected
DR31
Conn.
Gain
DR30
Vt.
Hold
DR29
Pa.
Hold
DR28
Ohio
Hold
DR27
N.H.
Hold
DR26
La.
Hold
DR25
Ky.
Hold
DR24
Ga.
Hold
DR23
S.C.
Re-elected
V1
N.Y.
F Loss
V2
Md.
F Loss
F9 F8 F7 F6 F5 F4 F3 F2
  F1

Results of the 1819 special electionsEdit

  DR1 DR2
DR12 DR11 DR10
Va.
Hold
DR9
Tenn.
Hold
DR8
Ky.
Hold
DR7
Ga.
Hold
DR6 DR5 DR4 DR3
DR13 DR14 DR15 DR16 DR17 DR18 DR19 DR20 DR21 DR22
Majority → DR23
DR32
Ala. Cl.2
New seat
DR31 DR30 DR29 DR28 DR27 DR26 DR25 DR24
DR33
Ala. Cl.3
New seat
DR34
Md. Cl.1
Gain
DR35
Md. Cl.3
Gain
V1 F8 F7 F6 F5 F4 F3
  F2 F1
Key:
DR# Democratic-Republican
F# Federalist
V# Vacant

Race summariesEdit

Special elections during the 15th CongressEdit

In these special elections, the winners were seated during 1818 or before March 4, 1819; ordered by election date.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Louisiana
(Class 2)
William C. C. Claiborne Democratic-Republican 1817 Incumbent died November 23, 1817.
New senator elected January 12, 1818.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Massachusetts
(Class 1)
Eli P. Ashmun Federalist 1816 (Special) Incumbent resigned May 10, 1818.
New senator elected June 5, 1818.
Federalist hold.
Illinois
(Class 3)
New State New State.
New senators elected October 7, 1818[3] on the first and third ballot. Lots were drawn to assign them, respectively, to Classes 3 and 2. The Class 3 senator had to run again for re-election in 1819, see below.
Two Democratic-Republican gains.
First ballot:

Second ballot:

Third ballot:
Illinois
(Class 2)
New State
Vermont
(Class 3)
James Fisk Democratic-Republican 1817 (Special) Incumbent resigned January 8, 1818 to serve as collector of customs for the district of Vermont.
New senator elected October 20, 1818 to finish the term.
Winner also elected to the following term, see below.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Georgia
(Class 2)
George M. Troup Democratic-Republican 1816 (Special)
1816
Incumbent resigned September 23, 1818.
New senator elected November 7, 1818 on the fourth ballot.
Democratic-Republican hold.

Races leading to the 16th CongressEdit

In these general elections, the winner was seated on March 4, 1819 (except where noted due to late election); ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 3 seats.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral
history
Connecticut David Daggett Federalist 1813 (Special) Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected October 22, 1818 on the third ballot.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Georgia Charles Tait Democratic-Republican 1809 (Special)
1813
Unknown if incumbent ran for re-election.
New senator elected November 11, 1818.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Illinois Ninian Edwards Democratic-Republican 1818 Incumbent re-elected in early February 1819.[3]
Indiana Waller Taylor Democratic-Republican 1816 Incumbent re-elected December 16, 1818.
Kentucky Isham Talbot Democratic-Republican 1814 (Special) Unknown if incumbent ran for re-election.
New senator elected December 17, 1818.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Louisiana Eligius Fromentin Democratic-Republican 1813 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected in January 11, 1819 on the second ballot.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Maryland Robert Goldsborough Federalist 1813 (Special) Incumbent lost re-election.
Legislature failed to elect and the seat became vacant.
Federalist loss.
None.
New Hampshire Clement Storer Democratic-Republican 1817 (Special) Unknown if incumbent ran for re-election.
New senator elected in 1818 on the third ballot.
Democratic-Republican hold.
New York Rufus King Federalist 1813 Incumbent ran for re-election.
Legislature failed to elect and the seat became vacant.
Federalist loss.
Incumbent would later be re-elected in 1820, late in the next Congress.
John C. Spencer (Democratic-Republican: Clintonian)
Philetus Swift
Rufus King (Federalist)
John Van Ness Yates (Democratic-Republican: Bucktail)
John Wells (Federalist)
Samuel Young (Democratic-Republican: Bucktail)[16]
North Carolina Nathaniel Macon Democratic-Republican 1815 (Special) Incumbent re-elected in 1818.[17]
Ohio Jeremiah Morrow Democratic-Republican 1812 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected January 30, 1819 on the fourth ballot.[19]
Democratic-Republican hold.
Pennsylvania Abner Lacock Democratic-Republican 1812 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected December 8, 1818.[20]
Democratic-Republican hold.
South Carolina John Gaillard Democratic-Republican 1812 Incumbent re-elected in 1818.[21]
Vermont James Fisk Democratic-Republican 1817 (Special) Incumbent resigned January 8, 1818 to serve as collector of customs for the district of Vermont.
New senator elected October 20, 1818.
Winner also elected to finish the term, see above.
Democratic-Republican hold.

Special elections during the 16th CongressEdit

In these special elections, the winners were seated in 1819 after March 4; ordered by election date. The new Congress was seated December 6, 1819, so some of these late-elected senators were seated after that.

State Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Tennessee
(Class 1)
John H. Eaton Democratic-Republican 1818 (Appointed) Interim appointee elected October 9, 1819.
Georgia
(Class 2)
John Forsyth Democratic-Republican 1818 (Special) Incumbent resigned February 17, 1819 to become U.S. Minister to Spain.
New senator elected November 6, 1819.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Kentucky
(Class 2)
John Crittenden Democratic-Republican 1816 Incumbent resigned March 3, 1819 to return to private practice.
New senator elected December 10, 1819.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Virginia
(Class 2)
John Eppes Democratic-Republican 1816 Incumbent resigned December 4, 1819 because of ill health.
New senator elected December 10, 1819.
Democratic-Republican hold.
Alabama
(Class 2)
New State New State.
New senator elected December 14, 1819.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Alabama
(Class 3)
New State New State.
New senator elected December 14, 1819.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Maryland
(Class 3)
Vacant Legislature had failed to elect, see above.
New senator elected late December 14, 1819 and qualified December 21, 1819.
Democratic-Republican gain.
Maryland
(Class 1)
Alexander Hanson Federalist 1816 (Special) Incumbent died April 23, 1819.
New senator elected December 14, 1819 and qualified December 21, 1819.
Democratic-Republican gain.

AlabamaEdit

ConnecticutEdit

GeorgiaEdit

Georgia (Specials)Edit

IllinoisEdit

IndianaEdit

KentuckyEdit

Kentucky (Special)Edit

LouisianaEdit

Louisiana (Special)Edit

MarylandEdit

Maryland (Special)Edit

Massachusetts (Special)Edit

New HampshireEdit

New YorkEdit

{Expand section}}

North CarolinaEdit

OhioEdit

PennsylvaniaEdit

South CarolinaEdit

Tennessee (Special)Edit

VermontEdit

Vermont (Special)Edit

Virginia (Special)Edit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Louisiana 1818 U.S. Senate, Special". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  2. ^ "Massachusetts 1818 U.S. Senate, Special". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d Buck, Solon J. (1917). Bill Thayer (ed.). "Illinois in 1818". University of Illinois Press. p. 304. Retrieved March 23, 2015.
  4. ^ "Illinois 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  5. ^ "Illinois 1818 U.S. Senate, Ballot 2". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  6. ^ "Illinois 1818 U.S. Senate, Ballot 3". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  7. ^ "Vermont 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  8. ^ "Georgia 1818 U.S. Senate, Special, Ballot 4". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  9. ^ "Connecticut 1818 U.S. Senate, Ballot 3". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  10. ^ "Georgia 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  11. ^ "Illinois 1819 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  12. ^ "Indiana 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 13, 2018.
  13. ^ "Kentucky 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 13, 2018.
  14. ^ "Louisiana 1819 U.S. Senate, Ballot 2". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  15. ^ "New Hampshire 1818 U.S. Senate, Ballot 3". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  16. ^ "New York 1819 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 16, 2018.
  17. ^ "MACON, Nathaniel, (1757 - 1837)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  18. ^ "North Carolina 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  19. ^ a b Taylor, William A. (1900). Ohio in Congress from 1803 to 1901 with Notes and Sketches of Senators and Representatives and Other Historical Data and Incidents. Columbus, Ohio: The XX. Century Publishing Co. p. 100 – via Google Books.
  20. ^ a b Cox, Harold (January 31, 2007). "Pennsylvania Election Statistics: 1682-2006" (PDF). The Wilkes University Election Statistics Project. Wilkes University.
  21. ^ "GAILLARD, John, (1765 - 1826)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  22. ^ "South Carolina 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 16, 2018.
  23. ^ "Vermont 1818 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  24. ^ "Tennessee 1819 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 13, 2018.
  25. ^ "Georgia 1819 U.S. Senate, Special". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  26. ^ "Kentucky 1819 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 13, 2018.
  27. ^ "Virginia 1819 U.S. Senate, Special". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 13, 2018.
  28. ^ "Alabama 1819 U.S. Senate, Class 2". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  29. ^ "Alabama 1819 U.S. Senate, Class 3". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  30. ^ "Maryland 1819 U.S. Senate". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved May 6, 2018.
  31. ^ "MD US Senate". Our Campaigns. August 30, 2004. Retrieved March 24, 2015.