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UEFA European Under-19 Championship

  (Redirected from UEFA European Under-19 Football Championship)

The UEFA European Under-19 Championship is an annual football competition for men organised by the sport's European governing body, UEFA.

UEFA European Under-19 Championship
UEFA European Under-19 Football Championship logo.svg
Founded1948
RegionEurope (UEFA)
Number of teamsMaximum of 54 (qualifying round)
28 (elite round)
8 (finals)
Current champions Portugal (4th title)
Most successful team(s) Spain
 England
(10 titles each)
2019 UEFA European Under-19 Championship qualification

Contents

History and formatEdit

The competition has been held since 1948. It was originally called the FIFA International Youth Tournament, until it was taken over by UEFA in 1956.[1] In 1980, it was restyled the UEFA European Under-18 Championship. As changes were made to player eligibility dates in 2001, the championship received its current name, which has been used since the 2002 championship.[2] The contest has been held every year since its inauguration in 1948, except for the period between 1984 and 1992, when it was only held every other year.

The tournament has been played in a number of different formats during its existence. Currently it consists of two stages, similar to UEFA's other European championship competitions. The qualifying stage is open to all UEFA members, and the final stage is contested between eight teams.

During even years, the best finishing teams qualify for the FIFA U-20 World Cup held in the next (odd) year. Currently, five teams can qualify for the World Cup, consisting of the top two of their groups plus the winner of a play-off match between the third-placed teams of each group.

The age limit of the event was under-18 (calendar year) at the beginning of the qualification but co-current with the new name, the age limit became under-19 during the final tournament. Thus, the age limit never changed as the qualification always began a year before the final tournament.[clarification needed]

Number of teamsEdit

Year of tournament Format of the final round Number of teams
1986–1992 Knockout format 8
1993 Two groups of four teams, third place play-off and final
1994 Two groups of four teams, fifth place play-off, third place play-off and final
1995–2002 Two groups of four teams, third place play-off and final
2003–2015 Two groups of four teams, semi-finals and final
2016–present Two groups of four teams, fifth place play-off (in even years only, for qualifying to FIFA U-20 World Cup), semi-finals and final

ResultsEdit

FIFA Youth Tournament (1948–1954)Edit

Year Host Final Third place match
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1948
details
  England  
England
3–2  
Netherlands
 
Belgium
3–1  
Italy
1949
details
  Netherlands  
France
4–1  
Netherlands
 
Belgium
5–0  
Ireland
1950
details
  Austria  
Austria
3–2  
France
 
Netherlands
6–0  
Luxembourg
1951
details
  France  
Yugoslavia
3–2  
Austria
 
Belgium
1–0  
Northern Ireland
1952
details
  Spain  
Spain
0–0 aet
Spain won on Goal Average
 
Belgium
 
Austria
5–5 Austria win on Coin Toss  
England
1953
details
  Belgium  
Hungary
2–0  
Yugoslavia
 
Turkey
3–2  
Spain
1954
details
  West Germany  
Spain
2–2 aet
Spain won on Goal Average
 
West Germany
 
Argentina
1–0  
Turkey

UEFA Youth Tournament (1955–1980)Edit

Year Host Final Third place match
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1955
Details
  Italy Only group matches were played and no winner was declared.
1956
Details
  Hungary Only group matches were played and no winner was declared.
1957
Details
  Spain  
Austria
3–2  
Spain
  France
  Italy
0–0 Third place
was shared
1958
Details
  Luxembourg  
Italy
1–0  
England
 
France
3–0  
Romania
1959
Details
  Bulgaria  
Bulgaria
1–0  
Italy
 
Hungary
6–1  
East Germany
1960
Details
  Austria  
Hungary
2–1  
Romania
 
Portugal
2–1  
Austria
1961
Details
  Portugal  
Portugal
4–0  
Poland
 
West Germany
2–1  
Spain
1962
Details
  Romania  
Romania
4–1  
Yugoslavia
 
Czechoslovakia
1–1 Czechoslovakia win on Coin Toss  
Turkey
1963
Details
  England  
England
4–0  
Northern Ireland
 
Scotland
4–2  
Bulgaria
1964
Details
  Netherlands  
England
4–0  
Spain
 
Portugal
3–2  
Scotland
1965
Details
  West Germany  
East Germany
3–2  
England
 
Czechoslovakia
4–1  
Italy
1966
Details
  Yugoslavia   Italy
  Soviet Union
0–0 The title
was shared
 
Yugoslavia
2–0  
Spain
1967
Details
  Turkey  
Soviet Union
1–0  
England
 
Turkey
1–1 Turkey win on Coin Toss  
France
1968
Details
  France  
Czechoslovakia
2–1  
France
 
Portugal
4–2  
Bulgaria
1969
Details
  East Germany  
Bulgaria
1–1 Bulgaria win on Coin Toss  
East Germany
 
Soviet Union
1–0  
Scotland
1970
Details
  Scotland  
East Germany
1–1 East Germany win on Coin Toss  
Netherlands
 
Scotland
2–0  
France
1971
Details
  Czechoslovakia  
England
3–0  
Portugal
 
East Germany
1–1
(5–3) pen.
 
Soviet Union
1972
Details
  Spain  
England
2–0  
West Germany
 
Poland
0–0
(6–5) pen.
 
Spain
1973
Details
  Italy  
England
3–2
aet
 
East Germany
 
Italy
1–0  
Bulgaria
1974
Details
  Sweden  
Bulgaria
1–0  
Yugoslavia
 
Scotland
1–0  
Greece
1975
Details
   Switzerland  
England
1–0
asdet
 
Finland
 
Hungary
(p) 2–2  
Turkey
1976
Details
  Hungary  
Soviet Union
1–0  
Hungary
 
Spain
3–0  
France
1977
Details
  Belgium  
Belgium
2–1  
Bulgaria
 
Soviet Union
7–2  
West Germany
1978
Details
  Poland  
Soviet Union
3–0  
Yugoslavia
 
Poland
3–1  
Scotland
1979
Details
  Austria  
Yugoslavia
1–0  
Bulgaria
 
England
0–0
(4–3) pen.
 
France
1980
Details
  East Germany  
England
2–1  
Poland
 
Italy
3–0  
Netherlands

UEFA European Under-18 Championship (1981–2001)Edit

Year Host Final Third place match
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1981
Details
  West Germany  
West Germany
1–0  
Poland
 
France
1–1
2–0 (p)
 
Spain
1982
Details
  Finland  
Scotland
3–1  
Czechoslovakia
 
Soviet Union
3–1  
Poland
1983
Details
  England  
France
1–0  
Czechoslovakia
 
England
1–1
4–2 (p)
 
Italy
1984
Details
  Soviet Union  
Hungary
0–0
3–2 (p)
 
Soviet Union
 
Poland
2–1  
Republic of Ireland
1986
Details
  Yugoslavia  
East Germany
3–1  
Italy
 
West Germany
1–0  
Scotland
1988
Details
  Czechoslovakia  
Soviet Union
3–1
(a.e.t.)
 
Portugal
 
East Germany
2–0  
Spain
1990
Details
  Hungary  
Soviet Union
0–0
4–2 (p)
 
Portugal
 
Spain
1–0  
England
1992
Details
  Germany  
Turkey
2–1
(asdet)
 
Portugal
 
Norway
1–1
8–7 (p)
 
England
1993
Details
  England  
England
1–0  
Turkey
 
Spain
2–1  
Portugal
1994
Details
  Spain  
Portugal
1–1
4–1 (p)
 
Germany
 
Spain
5–2  
Netherlands
1995
Details
  Greece  
Spain
4–1  
Italy
 
Greece
5–0  
Netherlands
1996
Details
  France  
France
1–0  
Spain
 
England
3–2
(a.e.t.)
 
Belgium
1997
Details
  Iceland  
France
1–0
(asdet)
 
Portugal
 
Spain
2–1  
Republic of Ireland
1998
Details
  Cyprus  
Republic of Ireland
1–1
4–3 (p)
 
Germany
 
Croatia
0–0
5–4 (p)
 
Portugal
1999
Details
  Sweden  
Portugal
1–0  
Italy
 
Republic of Ireland
1–0  
Greece
2000
Details
  Germany  
France
1–0  
Ukraine
 
Germany
3–1  
Czech Republic
2001
Details
  Finland  
Poland
3–1  
Czech Republic
 
Spain
6–2  
Yugoslavia

UEFA European Under-19 Championship (since 2002)Edit

Year Host Final Losing semi-finalists
(or third place match)
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
2002
Details
  Norway  
Spain
1–0  
Germany
 
Slovakia
2–1  
Republic of Ireland
2003
Details
  Liechtenstein  
Italy
2–0  
Portugal
  Austria and   Czech Republic
2004
Details
   Switzerland  
Spain
1–0  
Turkey
  Ukraine and    Switzerland
2005
Details
  Northern Ireland  
France
3–1  
England
  Serbia and Montenegro and   Germany
2006
Details
  Poland  
Spain
2–1  
Scotland
  Austria and   Czech Republic
2007
Details
  Austria  
Spain
1–0  
Greece
  France and   Germany
2008
Details
  Czech Republic  
Germany
3–1  
Italy
  Hungary and   Czech Republic
2009
Details
  Ukraine  
Ukraine
2–0  
England
  Serbia and   France
2010
Details
  France  
France
2–1  
Spain
  England and   Croatia
2011
Details
  Romania  
Spain
3–2
(a.e.t.)
 
Czech Republic
  Serbia and   Republic of Ireland
2012
Details
  Estonia  
Spain
1–0  
Greece
  France and   England
2013
Details
  Lithuania  
Serbia
1–0  
France
  Portugal and   Spain
2014
Details
  Hungary  
Germany
1–0  
Portugal
  Serbia and   Austria
2015
Details
  Greece  
Spain
2–0  
Russia
  Greece and   France
2016
Details
  Germany  
France
4–0  
Italy
  England and   Portugal
2017
Details
  Georgia  
England
2–1  
Portugal
  Czech Republic and   Netherlands
2018
Details
  Finland  
Portugal
4–3
(a.e.t.)
 
Italy
  France and   Ukraine
2019
Details
  Armenia
2020
Details
  Northern Ireland

StatisticsEdit

Performances by countriesEdit

Accurate as of 2018.

UEFA European Youth Championship
Team Titles Runners-up Third place Fourth place Semi-finalists Total (Top Four)
  England 10 (1948, 1963, 1964, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1980, 1993, 2017) 5 (1958, 1965, 1967, 2005, 2009) 3 3 3 24
  Spain 10 (1952, 1954, 1995, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2011, 2012, 2015) 4 (1957, 1964, 1996, 2010) 6 6 1 27
  France 8 (1949, 1983, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2016) 3 (1950, 1968, 2013) 3 4 5 23
  Germany 6 (1965, 1970, 1981, 1986, 2008, 2014) 7 (1954, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1994, 1998, 2002) 5 2 2 22
  Russia /   Soviet Union 6 (1966*, 1967, 1976, 1978, 1988, 1990) 2 (1984, 2015) 3 1 12
  Portugal 4 (1961, 1994, 1999, 2018) 8 (1971, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1997, 2003, 2014, 2017) 3 2 2 19
  Italy 3 (1958, 1966*, 2003) 7 (1959, 1986, 1995, 1999, 2008, 2016, 2018) 3 3 16
  Serbia /   Yugoslavia 3 (1951, 1979, 2013) 4 (1953, 1962, 1974, 1978) 1 1 4 13
  Bulgaria 3 (1959, 1969, 1974) 2 (1977, 1979) 3 8
  Hungary 3 (1953, 1960, 1984) 1 (1976) 2 1 7
  Austria 2 (1950, 1957) 1 (1951) 1 1 3 8
  Czech Republic /   Czechoslovakia 1 (1968) 4 (1982, 1983, 2001, 2011) 2 1 4 12
  Poland 1 (2001) 3 (1961, 1980, 1981) 3 1 8
  Turkey 1 (1992) 2 (1993, 2004) 2 3 8
  Scotland 1 (1982) 1 (2006) 3 4 9
  Belgium 1 (1977) 1 (1952) 3 1 6
  Romania 1 (1962) 1 (1960) 1 3
  Ukraine 1 (2009) 1 (2000) 2 4
  Republic of Ireland 1 (1998) 1 3 1 6
  Netherlands 3 (1948, 1949, 1970) 1 3 1 8
  Greece 2 (2007, 2012) 1 2 1 6
  Northern Ireland 1 (1963) 2 3
  Finland 1 (1975) 1
  Croatia 1 1 2
  Slovakia 1 1
  Norway 1 1
  Argentina 1 1
  Luxembourg 1 1
   Switzerland 1 1
Total (65th) 66 64 50 48 32 260

Note:
1966 Title Shared between   Italy and   Soviet Union.
1957 Third place Shared between   Italy and   France.

AwardsEdit

Golden Player AwardEdit

The Golden Player Award is awarded to the player who plays the most outstanding football during the tournament.

European Championship Golden Player Ref(s)
2002 Norway   Fernando Torres [3]
2003 Liechtenstein   Alberto Aquilani [4]
2004 Switzerland   Juanfran [5]
2005 Northern Ireland   Abdoulaye Baldé [6]
2006 Poland   Alberto Bueno [7]
2007 Austria   Sotiris Ninis [8]
2008 Czech Republic 1   Lars Bender
  Sven Bender
[9]
2009 Ukraine   Kyrylo Petrov [10]
2010 France   Gaël Kakuta [11]
2011 Romania   Álex Fernández [12]
2012 Estonia   Gerard Deulofeu [13]
2013 Lithuania   Aleksandar Mitrović [14]
2014 Hungary   Davie Selke [15]
2015 Greece   Marco Asensio [16]
2016 Germany   Jean-Kévin Augustin [17]
2017 Georgia   Mason Mount [18]

1 Honour shared.

Top goalscorerEdit

The Top goalscorer award is awarded to the player who scores the most goals during the tournament.

European Championship Top goalscorer Goals
2002 Norway   Fernando Torres 4
2003 Liechtenstein   Paulo Sérgio 5
2004 Switzerland   Ali Öztürk
  Łukasz Piszczek
4
2005 Northern Ireland   Borko Veselinović 5
2006 Poland   Alberto Bueno
  İlhan Parlak
5
2007 Austria   Änis Ben-Hatira
  Kostantinos Mitroglou
  Kévin Monnet-Paquet
3
2008 Czech Republic   Tomáš Necid 4
2009 Ukraine   Nathan Delfouneso 4
2010 France   Dani Pacheco 4
2011 Romania   Álvaro Morata 6
2012 Estonia   Jesé 5
2013 Lithuania   Gratas Sirgedas
  Anass Achahbar
  Alexandre Guedes
3
2014 Hungary   Davie Selke 6
2015 Greece   Borja Mayoral 3
2016 Germany   Jean-Kévin Augustin 6
2017 Georgia   Ben Brereton
  Ryan Sessegnon
  Joël Piroe
  Viktor Gyökeres
3
2018 Finland   João Filipe
  Francisco Trincão
5

FIFA U-20 World Cup performancesEdit

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • QF – Quarterfinals
  • R2 – Round 2
  • R1 – Round 1
  •      – Hosts
  •      – Not affiliated to UEFA
  • q – Qualified for upcoming tournament
Team  
1977
 
1979
 
1981
 
1983
 
1985
 
1987
 
1989
 
1991
 
1993
 
1995
 
1997
 
1999
 
2001
 
2003
 
2005
 
2007
 
2009
 
2011
 
2013
 
2015
 
2017
 
2019
Total
  Austria R1 R1 4th R1 R2 5
  Belgium R2 1
  Bulgaria QF QF 2
  Croatia Part of Yugoslavia R2 R1 R2 3
  Czech Republic/
  Czechoslovakia[19]
R1 R1 QF R1 2nd R2 6
  East Germany 3rd R1 Reunified with West Germany 2
  England 4th R1 R1 3rd R2 R1 R1 R1 R2 R1 1st 11
  Finland R1 1
  France R1 QF QF 4th 1st R2 6
  Germany/
  West Germany[20]
1st 2nd R1 R1 R1 R2 R1 QF QF QF R2 11
  Greece R2 1
  Hungary R1 R1 R1 R1 3rd R2 6
  Italy R1 R1 QF QF QF 3rd 6
  Netherlands QF R1 QF QF 4
  Norway R1 R1 2
  Poland 4th R1 3rd R2 Q 5
  Portugal QF 1st 1st R1 3rd R2 R2 2nd R2 QF QF 11
  Republic of Ireland R1 R1 3rd R2 R2 5
  Romania 3rd 1
  Russia/
  Soviet Union[21]
1st 2nd R1 4th QF 3rd QF QF 8
  Scotland QF QF R1 3
  Serbia/
  Yugoslavia[22]
R1 1st 1st 3
  Slovakia Part of Czechoslovakia R2 1
  Spain R1 QF R1 2nd R1 QF 4th QF 1st 2nd QF QF R2 QF QF 15
  Sweden R1 1
   Switzerland R1 1
  Turkey R1 R2 R2 3
  Ukraine Part of Soviet Union R2 R2 R2 3

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "UEFA history - Early days and constant expansion". UEFA. 13 February 2017. Retrieved 19 October 2017.
  2. ^ "Competition history". UEFA. Retrieved 19 October 2017.
  3. ^ "2002: Fernando Torres". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 April 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  4. ^ "2003: Alberto Aquilani". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 April 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  5. ^ "2004: Juanfran". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 April 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  6. ^ "2005: Abdoulaye Balde". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 April 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  7. ^ "2006: Alberto Bueno". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 April 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  8. ^ "2007: Sotiris Ninis". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 April 2008. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  9. ^ "2008: Lars & Sven Bender". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 January 2009. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  10. ^ "2009: Kyrylo Petrov". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 August 2009. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  11. ^ "2010: Gaël Kakuta". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 2 August 2010. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  12. ^ "2011: Álex Fernández". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 August 2011. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  13. ^ "2012: Gerard Deulofeu". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 16 July 2012. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  14. ^ "2013: Aleksandar Mitrović". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 8 August 2013. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  15. ^ "2014: Davie Selke". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 September 2014. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  16. ^ "2015: Marco Asensio". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 August 2015. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  17. ^ "2016: Jean-Kévin Augustin". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 27 July 2016. Retrieved 28 July 2016.
  18. ^ "2017: Mason Mount". UEFA.com. 25 July 2017.
  19. ^ Czechoslovakia was divided into Slovakia and the Czech Republic in 1993 after the Dissolution of Czechoslovakia. FIFA considers the Czech Republic as successor team of Czechoslovakia.
  20. ^ FIFA attributes all the results of West Germany (1977-1991) to Germany.
  21. ^ The USSR was dissolved in 1991. The 15 nations that were former Soviet Republics now compete separately. FIFA considers Russia as the successor team of the USSR.
  22. ^ The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia broke up in 1991 all the nations that formed this country now compete separately. FIFA considers Serbia as the successor team of Yugoslavia.

External linksEdit