Tustin Playbox

Tustin Playbox was a community theatre company based in Tustin, California that drew upon local amateurs and Hollywood professionals. Founded in 1952, the group presented different productions each summer season. From 1955 on it proved financially successful and helped launch the screen careers of several performers, before abruptly closing in July 1960.

Tustin Playbox
Formation1952
Dissolved1960
TypeTheatre group
PurposeCommunity Theatre
Location
Notable members
Ray Aghayan
Kathie Browne
Zeev Buffman
Tony Carbone
Robert Cornthwaite
Nancy Hadley
Werner Klemperer
Robert McQueeney
Sherwood Price
Joseph Sargent
William Schallert
Brad Trumbull
Robert Vaughn
Bobs Watson

OriginEdit

Prior to 1952, there were only two theatre groups operating along the coast south of Los Angeles, the area covered by Orange and San Diego counties: the Laguna Beach Playhouse, founded in 1920, which had a dedicated building for its venue; and the now famous La Jolla Playhouse, founded in 1947, which used the auditorium of La Jolla High School for its productions through the early 1960s. The burgeoning growth in this area after 1945 convinced one local resident that there was a potential audience for a third theatre group.

May Rose Borum founded the Tustin Playbox in June 1952.[1] She was a former Tustin High School English and Drama teacher, who had gone on to teach Drama at Los Angeles City College (LACC). She had prior associations with professional stage productions in the Los Angeles area, but was not herself a performer.

Borum convinced the Tustin Elementary School District to allow her to use the then new auditorium building at the Tustin Grammar School for staging plays in the summer when the school was closed. (The former Grammar School Auditorium building, at 300 South C Street, was converted to the Tustin Unified School District Administration Center in 1961–1962).[2] The contract approved by the district charged $25 weekly rental and placed restrictions on what facilities could be used at the school.[3]

Because the auditorium building was small and doubled as a gymnasium, there was no raised stage or proscenium. Productions would have to be mounted using center staging, more often called "Theatre in the round". The adjacent Home Economics room served as the makeup and dressing area. A sixteen year old volunteer, Steve Atherton, designed and built a lighting system and served as the electrician for the troupe.[4] Another volunteer, Nancy Christensen, provided accompaniment on a small organ for the occasional musical.[5]

First two seasonsEdit

Borum brought two of her LACC drama students along for the first season. Ray Aghayan, an established designer-director for small theaters, would fulfill the same roles in Tustin.[6] Jacquelyn Sue Browne, who had won an LACC award for Best Actress, would play female leads under the stage name "Cathy Browne" (which she later changed to "Kathie Browne").[7]

Plays were presented Tuesday through Saturday evenings, with a two-week run for each play. The plays were all stock work from recent decades; no original productions were mounted the first two years. Only three already notable actors appeared in the first two seasons: Bobs Watson, Tony Carbone, and Beverly Long. A few younger performers would later become well known in other mediums: Cathy Browne, Zeev Buffman, and Sherwood Price. The rest of the casts those first two seasons were local amateurs.

Browne was very popular with the Tustin audience, playing one of the female leads in nearly every production those first two seasons. Price, who had a touring company background, was brought on for the second season and proved popular with both the audience and Browne.[fn 1] Browne and Price announced their engagement at the close of the second season, marrying in November 1953.[7][8]

Leadership changeEdit

Borum turned over the producer role to newlyweds Browne and Price during spring 1954, as she had a commitment to produce a play at the Ivar Theatre in Hollywood that summer.[9][10] She took designer/director Ray Aghayan with her (they were married from 1955 to 1971).[11] The new producers were granted a two-year lease, which in August 1955 was renewed as a three-year lease.[12]

Browne and Price expanded the number of plays performed each season from four to five, retaining the two week run of each. They also instituted a series of five original children's plays, written by Sadie Hurwitz, to be performed on Saturday afternoons, which would also change every other week. From previous experience Price knew these matinees were moneymakers, at a time when less than half of American homes owned television sets. Local amateurs and drama school apprentices provided the cast for the matinees, while by 1956 leads for the evening productions were all professional actors.[13] This had its drawbacks; the producers could not afford to hire understudies. When the star of one 1956 play was delayed on a television set in Burbank, the audience chose to wait two hours rather than accept their admission charge back.[14]

The producers also experimented with winter matinees for children and a winter play for families put on at the Tustin High School auditorium. Another innovation was a Sunday night revival of Victorian theatre, with a melodrama and musical variety acts. They also presented the only original evening production ever done at the Playbox, a musical revue called Line Up the Girls!, written by locals Bob Bowers and Sadie Hurwitz.[15]

Community involvementEdit

The Tustin Playbox depended on community support in the form of volunteers, who handled the technical aspects of productions, and sponsors, who arranged summer housing for visiting actors and used their influence to ensure the school district remained amenable to renting its facilities.[16]

The most vital local support for the Tustin Playbox came from the owners of The Tustin News, William and Lucille Moses. Their weekly newspaper provided coverage for all of the producer's forthcoming plans and actual productions, and in later seasons Lucille Moses would provide reviews under her own byline. The paper also gave space to covering the growing screen careers of Browne and Price.

A number of Tustin residents formed the Tustin Playbox Association with two primary aims: to find or build a nearby permanent venue for the performing company, and to sponsor year-round performances.[17] The producers encouraged this effort, but neither aim was ever achieved.

GrowthEdit

With each new season, the reputation of the Tustin Playbox grew, bringing in full houses.[18] Tustin lay near existing road, rail, and bus networks, allowing easy access for actors coming from Hollywood and audiences from all directions. Its nearest competitor, the Laguna Beach Playhouse, had suffered a mid-season breakdown in 1955 when its production company dissolved, and was off to a late start for the 1956 season.[19]

As actors, Browne and Price began receiving parts in television shows and films from producers who had seen their performances.[20] As producers, they were recruited by the Laguna Beach community to also take over the Playhouse, which they agreed to do for the 1957 season only.[21]

The Playbox benefited from drawing quality stage directors, including William Schallert, Robert Cornthwaite, and Joseph Sargent. Price's best friend, upcoming actor Robert Vaughn, also lent a hand at directing. Actress Nancy Hadley had received a significant boost to her television work after appearing in several plays at Tustin during the 1954 season.

Later seasonsEdit

Standing room only crowds at many Tustin productions drove Price to negotiate with the school district to begin using the much larger auditorium of Tustin High School for the eighth season (1959).[22] This had a raised stage, curtains, lighting, and backstage areas, enabling the company to abandon center staging. The school district also wanted to repurpose the now outdated Tustin Grammar School. The district's student population had increased tenfold since 1952 and new elementary schools had been built; the small Grammar School would soon be converted to a year-round administration center.[2]

Another change for this season was the near disappearance of Cathy Browne from performances and production credits. She did only two plays that summer, under her new billing of "Kathie Browne", while advertisements now read "Sherwood Price Productions". The Playbox also offered a sixth play this year, an end-of-season performance of Gigi starring Browne and Robert Vaughn, who also directed it.[23]

For the ninth season (1960), Price split his efforts between the Tustin Playbox and a new venue in Fullerton, California. The "Fullerton Music Playhouse" would present Broadway musicals with full sets, props, and costumes. Price hired Werner Klemperer to direct the five plays planned for Tustin, and Joseph Sargent to stage the five musicals in Fullerton. That spring, all three men held a round table discussion with a local social club on current theater trends.[24] Price also hired a general manager for each location.[25]

ClosingEdit

The end came unexpectedly for the Tustin Playbox. On Saturday, July 9, 1960, Orange County Deputy Sheriffs attached the Tustin Playbox as part of a larger lawsuit against Sherwood Price Productions.[26] While the Playbox itself was financially solvent, Price had overextended his resources by opening the Fullerton Music Playhouse. Instead of creating a separate production company for the new venture, he had included it with the existing Tustin Playbox business organization. Creditors complained of overdue payments for the Fullerton business, and both venues were shut down as a result.[26]

Stage productionsEdit

Listed by year of first performance, excluding children's matinees
Year Play Director Producer Leads
1952 The Imaginary Invalid Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Bobs Watson, Beverly Long, Cathy Browne, Pamela Payton, Zeev Buffman[27]
See How They Run Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Bobs Watson, Cathy Browne, Pamela Payton, Edward Tornow, Zeev Buffman [28]
Candida Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Cathy Browne, Bobs Watson, Pamela Payton, John Nelson, Max Slaten, Kenneth Morgan[29]
Light Up the Sky Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Pamela Payton, Bobs Watson, Cathy Browne, Ray Aghayan, Kenneth Morgan, Wilmot I. Stewart, Jan Olson [30]
1953 Lady in the Dark Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Barbara Lee Cook, Tony Carbone, Paul White, Max Slaten, Cathy Browne, Zeev Buffman, Sherwood Price[31]
Miranda Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Cathy Browne, Sherwood Price, Roberta Foster, Wilmot I. Stewart, Joy Campbell[32]
Caesar and Cleopatra Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Tony Carbone, Cathy Browne, Wilmot I. Stewart, Max Slaten, Sherwood Price, Jack Stewart[33]
Brigadoon Ray Aghayan May Rose Borum Jackie Joseph, Paul White, Gayl Gleason, Ray Aghayan, Jack Stewart, Sherwood Price, Zeev Buffman[34]
1954 Blithe Spirit Diane Delaire and Henri Ficher Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Montgomery Reed, Wilmot I. Stewart, Nancy Hadley, Jeanne Brown, Philip Moore[35]
Petticoat Fever Cathy and Sherwood Price Sherwood Price, Cathy Browne, Philip Moore, Nancy Hadley, Stanley Mann[36]
The Voice of the Turtle Philip Moore Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Philip Moore[37]
The Country Girl Ray Aghayan Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Sherwood Price, Stanley Mann, Philip Moore, Elizabeth Robbins[38]
Bell, Book and Candle Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Philip Moore, Nancy Norvel, Sherwood Price, Stanley Mann[39]
A Christmas Carol Cathy Browne and Steve Atherton Cathy and Sherwood Price Cliffe Hall, Nick Coster, John Trayne, Stanley Mann, Nancy Norvell[40]
1955 Private Lives Ray Aghayan Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Thomas Vize, Sammie Craiker, Philip Moore, Marjorie Ames[41]
Bertha the Beautiful Typewriter Girl Cathy and Sherwood Price Sherwood Price, Philip Moore, Marjorie Ames, Judy Howard, Stanley Mann[42]
The Milky Way Ray Aghayan Cathy and Sherwood Price Stanley Mann, Elizabeth Robbins, Sherwood Price, Philip Moore, Paul White[43]
Night Must Fall Ray Aghayan Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Sherwood Price, Nancy Norvell, Stanley Mann, Majorie Ames[44]
The Moon Is Blue Ray Aghayan Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Philip Moore, Stanley Mann, William Secrist[45]
Line Up the Girls! Ray Aghayan Cathy and Sherwood Price An original musical revue with a cast of local amateurs[15]
1956 Picnic William Schallert Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Brad Trumbull, Nancy Hadley, Dianne DeLaire, Jack Stewart, Tommy Vize[46]
Born Yesterday Robert Vaughn Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Sherwood Price, Brad Trumbull, Tommy Vize, David Young[47]
Come Back, Little Sheba Brad Trumbull Cathy and Sherwood Price Dianne DeLaire, Nancy Hadley, Tommy Vize[48]
The Tender Trap Cathy Browne Cathy and Sherwood Price Sherwood Price, Brad Trumbull, Marietta Hayes, Kris Hagen, Lynn Alden[49]
Oh Men! Oh Women! Monte Reed Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Tommy Vize, Kris Hagen, Brad Trumbull, David Young[50]
1957 The Rainmaker William Schallert Cathy and Sherwood Price Brad Trumbull, Cathy Browne, Robert Cornthwaite, Kevin Hagen, Bill Hunt[51]
Champagne Complex William Schallert Cathy and Sherwood Price Joe Flynn, Nancy Hadley, Robert Chapline[52]
The Seven Year Itch Brad Trumbull Cathy and Sherwood Price Bill Hunt, Kipp Hamilton, Robert Chapline, Lonie Blackman, Melora Conway[53]
The Little Hut Joseph Sargent Cathy and Sherwood Price Tommy Vize, Mary Carver, Robert Chapline, Michael Costello[54]
Bus Stop Brad Trumbull Cathy and Sherwood Price Doreen Porter, Don Summers, Sherwood Price, Melora Conway, Kevin Hagen[55]
1958 Boy Meets Girl Leon Chooluck Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Brad Trumbull, Patricia Walter, Jack Grinnage, Joe Conley[56]
Dial M for Murder Steve Rich Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Robert McQueeney, Sherwood Price, Brad Trumbull, Henry Hunter [57]
Anniversary Waltz Ralph Rose Cathy and Sherwood Price Brad Trumbull, Norma Kendall, Henry Hunter, Marcella Connor, Sherwood Price [58]
Janus Robert Cornthwaite Cathy and Sherwood Price Cathy Browne, Brad Trumbull, Henry Hunter, Marcella Connor [59]
Charley's Aunt Bernard Thompson Cathy and Sherwood Price Sherwood Price, Robert McQueeney, Cathy Browne, Jack Grinnage, Jackie Joseph[60]
1959 The Matchmaker Joseph Sargent Sherwood Price Marcella Connors, Henry Hunter, Sherwood Price, Jack Grinnage, Pat Walter[61]
Holiday for Lovers Robert McQueeney Sherwood Price Brad Trumbull, Dorothy Lovett, Elizabeth Altenberg, Henry Hunter, Pat Walter[62]
A Hole in the Head Sherwood Price Henry Hunter, Pat Walter, Jack Grinnage, Bill Hunt, Marcella Connors, Brad Trumbull[63]
Visit to a Small Planet Joseph Sargent Sherwood Price Allan Reed, Kathie Browne, Alan Reed Jr, Henry Hunter, Marcella Connors[64][65]
Tunnel of Love Paul Garrison Sherwood Price Bill Hunt, Mariellen Smith, Sherwood Price, Pat Walters, Evelyn Bunn[66]
Gigi Robert Vaughn Sherwood Price Kathie Browne, Robert Vaughn, Marcella Connors, Dorothy Lovett, Pat Walters[23]
1960 Once More with Feeling Werner Klemperer Sherwood Price Hugh Marlowe, K. T. Stevens, Henry Hunter, A. G. Vitanza, Robert Gibbons [67]
Who Was That Lady I Saw You With? Werner Klemperer Sherwood Price Lori Nelson, Richard Andrews, Grant Richards, Barney Biro, Pamela Branch[68]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Price's birth name was Frank Sherwood Gell; his early credits from 1948 were as Sherwood Gell, eventually changing to Sherwood Price in 1952.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Tustin Playbox to Present Summer Stock Plays with Center Staging". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. June 27, 1952. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ a b "$200,000 Replacement of Elementary Auditorium". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 27, 1961. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Forward Contract to Tustin Playbox for Auditorium". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. March 13, 1953. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Summer Theater on at Tustin". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 4, 1954. p. 92 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Tustin Has Music Hit". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 10, 1953. p. 59 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Director-Designer Ray Aghayan Signed for Local Summer Theater". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 4, 1952. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ a b "Playbox Stars to Wed Nov. 22". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. November 20, 1953. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Sherwood P Gell in the California, U.S., Marriage Index, 1949-1959, retrieved from Ancestry.com
  9. ^ "Stock Will Reopen in Tustin". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. May 1954. p. 88 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "'Not For Burning' Hailed Prior to Ivar Engagement". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. June 25, 1954. p. 85 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ May Rose Borum in the California, U.S., Divorce Index, 1966-1984, retrieved from Ancestry.com
  12. ^ "Board of Trustees Hold Annual Budget Hearing Meeting". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. August 11, 1955. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ ""Picnic" Opens Summer Season for Tustin Playbox Actors". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. May 24, 1956. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Notes on Our Cuffs". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 29, 1956. p. 139 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ a b "Music Revue at Tustin to Cap Season". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 14, 1955. p. 135 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Moses, Bill (May 14, 1959). "Tustin Turn-Ups". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Year Round Shows Goal of Playbox at Tustin". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. December 12, 1954. p. 163 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "SRO Sign Out for 'Tender Trap'". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. August 9, 1956. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ Schallert, Edwin (June 10, 1956). "Summer Theater Booming". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. p. 119 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Playbox Producers Going East for Parleys, TV Work". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. September 11, 1955. p. 104 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ Schallert, Edwin (June 13, 1957). "Brisk Openings Ahead for Straw Hat Season". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. p. 119 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "Tustin Paybox to Open Season at High School". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. May 3, 1959. p. 226 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ a b Dunlap, Velma (August 31, 1959). "'Gigi' Proves Delightful in Tustin". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. p. 26 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Stage Talk". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. April 21, 1960. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Reed For Tustin". The Valley Times. Van Nuys, California. June 18, 1960. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ a b "Playbox Closes By Attachment". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 14, 1960. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Bobs Watson Tustin Star". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 17, 1952. p. 48 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "'See How They Run' Now Featured by Local Summer Stock Company". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. August 1, 1952. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "'Candida' to Open Tuesday". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 10, 1952. p. 117 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "Hart Comedy Entertaining". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 27, 1952. p. 30 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Tustin Has Music Hit". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 10, 1953. p. 59 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "'Miranda' Next Production at Tustin Playbox". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 17, 1953. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "GBS Play Runs One More Week". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. August 7, 1953. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "'Brigadoon' Opens as Final Tustin Offering". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 24, 1953. p. 63 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Coward Opus Opens Tustin Play Season". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. June 24, 1954. p. 43 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Tustin Farce Gains Favor". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 9, 1954. p. 54 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Tustin Playbox Offers 'Voice of the Turtle'". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 18, 1954. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "'Country Girl' at Playbox". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 8, 1954. p. 113 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "'Bell, Book and Candle' Well Done at Tustin". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 20, 1954. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "Tustin Ready to Go With Dickens' 'Carol'". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. December 5, 1954. p. 200 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ "Tustin Playbox Opening Night Sees Capacity Crowd for "Private Lives"". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. June 24, 1955. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ "Time for Hisses". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. June 26, 1955. p. 194 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ ""Milky Way", Second Playbox 1955 Production Is Now in Rehearsal". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. June 30, 1955. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com.
  44. ^ "Playbox Now Open With New Play; "Night Must Fall", Runs Two Weeks". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 21, 1955. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "Playbox Now Playing "The Moon Is Blue"". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 28, 1955. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ "Inge Play Presented at Tustin". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. June 22, 1956. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ "Tustin Playbox Gives 'Born Yesterday' by Kanin". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 6, 1956. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  48. ^ "Tustin Playbox Changes Plays for Coming Week". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 12, 1956. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ "'Tender Trap' Baited at Tustin Playbox". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 6, 1956. p. 38 – via Newspapers.com.
  50. ^ ""Oh Men! Oh Women!" Merry Stage Offering at Tustin". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 17, 1956. p. 24 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ "'Rainmaker' Opens Tustin Play Season". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. June 21, 1957. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  52. ^ Schallert, Edwin (June 24, 1957). "'Champagne Complex' Light, Summery Show". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. p. 74 – via Newspapers.com.
  53. ^ "Tustin Cast Scores in 'Seven Year Itch'". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. July 20, 1957. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com.
  54. ^ Hardy, John (August 8, 1957). "'Little Hut' Amuses at Playbox". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  55. ^ "'Bus Stop' Presented Onstage at Tustin". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. August 16, 1957. p. 22 – via Newspapers.com.
  56. ^ "Hollywood Profile to Open Playbox Season". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. June 22, 1958. p. 165 – via Newspapers.com.
  57. ^ Moses, Lucille (July 3, 1958). "Reviewer Finds 'Dial M for Murder' Interesting Mystery at Dress Rehearsal". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  58. ^ Moses, Lucille (July 17, 1958). "'Anniversary Waltz' at Tustin Playbox". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com.
  59. ^ "Popular Playbox Stars to Share Spotlight Next Week in 'Janus'". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 24, 1958. p. 4 – via Newspapers.com.
  60. ^ Moses, Lucille (August 14, 1958). "'Charley's Aunt' Quite a Girl, Reviewer Finds". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  61. ^ Moses, Lucille (June 18, 1959). "'Matchmaker' Lifts Lid on Tustin Playbox". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  62. ^ "Last Call to See Playbox 'Holiday'". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 9, 1959. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  63. ^ "Dilemma". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 9, 1959. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  64. ^ "Martians Have Landed". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. July 23, 1959. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  65. ^ Moses, Lucille (July 30, 1959). "Star Allan Reed Proves Interesting Person As Well as Versitile Actor". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com.
  66. ^ Dunlap, Velma (August 18, 1959). "Stage Play Amuses at Tustin Playbox". The Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. p. 25 – via Newspapers.com.
  67. ^ Moses, Lucille (June 23, 1960). "Tustin Playbox Season Opener Shows Polished Professionalism with Stars". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.
  68. ^ Moses, Lucille (July 7, 1960). "'Who Was That Lady I Saw You With?' Offers Fine Cast, Excellent Direction". The Tustin News. Tustin, California. p. 1 – via Newspapers.com.