Tru by Hilton is an American chain of hotels owned by Hilton Worldwide.[2][3][4]

Tru by Hilton
Company typeSubsidiary
IndustryHospitality
FoundedJanuary 2016; 8 years ago (2016-01)
FounderHilton Worldwide
Headquarters,
Number of locations
228 (2022)[1]
ParentHilton Worldwide
Websitewww.trubyhilton.com

History

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Try by Hilton in Lake City, Florida

The hotel brand was announced in January 2016 at the Americas Lodging Investment Summit in Los Angeles. It was designed to compete against Comfort Inn and La Quinta,[5] and the first Tru by Hilton hotels were expected to open late in the same year.[6] The goal was to create rooms of 228 square feet (21.2 m2) with "clever" bathrooms. The brand uses platform beds instead of box springs and uses a landing zone where guests can place their luggage and hang their clothes rather than a dresser. Hilton realized that they could shrink the width of the room from the typical 12 to 10 feet (3.66 to 3.05 m) because typically the TV cabinet would take up 2 feet (0.61 m), but with flat screen televisions the space could be spared. The desk that was decided to be used is a portable chair attached to a table, allowing the guest to use the chair wherever they want in the room.[7] As of February 2021, it has 178 properties with 17,403 rooms in two countries and territories, all franchised.[1]

Operations

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Tru by Hilton operates as a franchise under Hilton Worldwide. When the launch of the new brand was announced, Tru by Hilton had already signed over 100 franchise agreements.[8][9] The brand will occupy the mid-scale hotel market.[10] Tru by Hilton was designed to be scalable so that properties could vary in size and still fit in urban, suburban, airport or highway adjacent settings.[11] The brand's initial locations were in the Atlanta, Cheyenne, WY, Dallas, Houston, Chicago, St. Louis: St. Charles, Missouri, Denver, Portland, Boise, ID,[12] Oklahoma City and Nashville markets.[3][9]

The hotels offer limited food and beverage options and feature a social area characterized by a large central lobby, referred to as The Hive, that is divided into sections for eating, working, playing and lounging.[5] The front desk, called the Command Center, also features a social media wall to engage guests.[13]

References

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  1. ^ a b "Hilton Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year Results". businesswire.com. Retrieved 19 November 2021.
  2. ^ Yu, Hui-Yong (25 January 2016). "Hilton Says New Tru Hotels May Become Company's Biggest Brand". Bloomberg Business. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  3. ^ a b Glusac, Elaine (25 January 2016). "New From Hilton: Midpriced Hotels Geared Toward Millennials". The New York Times. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  4. ^ Kell, John (25 January 2016). "Hilton Debuts New Chain to Win Over Millennials". Fortune. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  5. ^ a b Bender, Andrew (27 January 2016). "Hilton Debuts Affordable 'Tru By Hilton' Brand for Millennials, Techies and Those Who Love Them". Forbes. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  6. ^ Martin, Hugo (25 January 2016). "Hilton Plans Lower-Cost Brand With Several Hotels, Some in Southern California". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  7. ^ Fox, Jena Tesse (19 Dec 2016). "Tru story: How Hilton brought its newest brand to life". Hotel Management. 231 (17): 8.n ghhghjgghn
  8. ^ Higley, Jeff (25 January 2016). "Hilton Unveils Tru Brand to Fill Midscale Void". Hotel News Now. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  9. ^ a b Stein, Lindsay (25 January 2016). "Hilton Introduces New Hotel Brand With Millennial Mindset". Advertising Age. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  10. ^ Downey, Sean (28 January 2016). "'Tru' Story on Hilton's Newest Brand". Lodging Magazine. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  11. ^ Bubny, Paul (25 January 2016). "Hilton Aims at Midscale 'Gap' With New Brand". GlobeSt. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  12. ^ Staff, IBR (22 March 2017). "Tru by Hilton breaks ground on Eagle Road in Meridian". idahobusinessreview.com. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  13. ^ Steele, Anne (25 January 2016). "Hilton to Offer Value Brand Aimed at Younger Guests". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
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