Tropical Storm Dumako

Moderate Tropical Storm Dumako was a weak tropical cyclone that caused moderate damage in Madagascar. The fourth disturbance and fourth named storm of the 2021–22 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season, it was the third storm to make landfall on Madagascar in 2022 after Ana and Batsirai.

Tropical Storm Dumako
Moderate tropical storm (SWIO scale)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Dumako 2022-02-15 1008Z.jpg
Dumako approaching Madagascar shortly after peak intensity.
Formed10 February 2022
Dissipated18 February 2022
Highest winds10-minute sustained: 85 km/h (50 mph)
1-minute sustained: 95 km/h (60 mph)
Lowest pressure993 hPa (mbar); 29.32 inHg
Fatalities14
Damage$1 million (2022 USD)
Areas affectedMadagascar, Mozambique
Part of the 2021–22 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

Meteorological historyEdit

 
Map plotting the storm's track and intensity, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale
Map key
  Tropical depression (≤38 mph, ≤62 km/h)
  Tropical storm (39–73 mph, 63–118 km/h)
  Category 1 (74–95 mph, 119–153 km/h)
  Category 2 (96–110 mph, 154–177 km/h)
  Category 3 (111–129 mph, 178–208 km/h)
  Category 4 (130–156 mph, 209–251 km/h)
  Category 5 (≥157 mph, ≥252 km/h)
  Unknown
Storm type
  Extratropical cyclone / Remnant low / Tropical disturbance / Monsoon depression

On 10 February, a zone of disturbed weather formed over the central South Indian Ocean. One day later, the JTWC recognized it as Invest 94S.[1][2] On the same day at 18:00 UTC, MFR designated the system as a tropical disturbance. A day later, the MFR upgraded the disturbance to a tropical depression. The JTWC issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert for this system. On 13 February, the JTWC recognized the system as Tropical Cyclone 12S at 06:00 UTC. At 18:00 UTC, the MFR upgraded the system to a moderate tropical storm and designated it as Dumako.[3] The storm continued intensifying, and at 06:00 UTC on February 14, Dumako reached its peak intensity as a moderate tropical storm, with maximum 10-minute sustained winds of 85 km/h (50 mph), maximum 1-minute sustained winds of 95 km/h (60 mph), and a minimum central pressure of 993 hPa.[4][5] Around 12:00 UTC, Dumako made landfall as a moderate tropical storm near Sainte-Marie Island, Madagascar with winds of 65 km/h (40 mph). Afterward, due to land interaction, the storm began to weaken. After a few hours, it weakened into a tropical depression. It entered the Mozambique Channel before dissipating on 18 February.[citation needed]

ImpactEdit

MadagascarEdit

At least 113 houses were damaged, more than 5000 people were affected.[6] Flooding killed at least 14 people in Madagascar and 4,323 people were displaced.[7]

Mozambique and MalawiEdit

Heavy rain was recorded in South Malawi and caused flooding in some areas.[8] The city of Quelimane experienced flooding, with power lines experiencing damage. 160 families were displaced and 30 hectares (74 acres) of crops were destroyed in Malema District.[9] No deaths were reported in Mozambique and Malawi.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Significant Tropical Weather Advisory for the Indian Ocean Reissued 110330Z-111800Z February 2022". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 11 February 2022. Archived from the original on 11 February 2022. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  2. ^ "Dumako : 10/02/2022 to 18/02/2022". Météo-France. Retrieved 23 February 2022.
  3. ^ "Tropical Storm Dumako" (PDF). www.meteo.fr.
  4. ^ Moderate Tropical Storm Dumako (06:00 UTC). "Bulletins CMRS". www.meteo.fr. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  5. ^ JTWC best track data. "Joint typhoon warning center".
  6. ^ "Madagascar – Storm Dumako Leaves 6 Dead, Homes Damaged – FloodList". floodlist.com. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  7. ^ Reuters (19 February 2022). "Madagascar braces for next cyclone as at least 14 killed by storm". Reuters. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  8. ^ Mhango, Tiwonge Kumwenda (18 February 2022). "Malawi: Tropical Storm Dumako to Hit South Malawi". allAfrica.com. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  9. ^ "Chuvas fortes destroem em Sofala, Zambézia e Nampula". Notícias (in Portuguese). 21 February 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2022.

External linksEdit