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Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue

Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue! is a platform game based on Pixar's 1999 computer animated film Toy Story 2. It is the sequel to the first Toy Story video game. It was released for the Nintendo 64, PlayStation, Microsoft Windows, and Macintosh in late 1999, while a Dreamcast version followed in 2000. The computer versions were released under the title Disney/Pixar's Action Game, Toy Story 2. A different version, a side-scrolling platform game titled Toy Story 2, was also released for the Game Boy Color in 1999.

Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue!
Toystory264.jpg
North American Nintendo 64 cover art
Developer(s)Traveller's Tales
Tiertex Design Studios (GBC)
Publisher(s)Activision
Disney Interactive (PC)
THQ (GBC)
Director(s)Jon Burton[a]
Producer(s)Jon Osborne (GBC)[5]
Peter Wyse (other versions)[a]
Designer(s)Joel Goodsell[a]
Jon Burton[a]
Programmer(s)Jon Burton[a]
Artist(s)Kevin Knott (GBC)[5]
Writer(s)Peter Wyse[a]
Renee Johnson[a]
Composer(s)Andy Blythe and Marten Joustra[a]
Platform(s)PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Game Boy Color, Dreamcast, Microsoft Windows, Macintosh
Release
Genre(s)Platform
Mode(s)Single-player

Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue! was re-released as a downloadable game for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable in 2011, followed by a downloadable PlayStation Vita re-release in 2012. A sequel to the game was released 11 years later, based on Toy Story 3.

PlotEdit

The game's plot is relative to the Toy Story 2 film, and begins at Andy's house as Al McWhiggin steals Woody from the family's yard sale. Buzz Lightyear, Hamm, Rex, Slinky and Mr. Potato Head venture out to find and rescue Woody. After leaving Andy's house, the toys enter the neighborhood in which Andy lives, then proceed to Al's Toy Barn, the penthouse where Al lives and finally the airport terminal and tarmac where the movie ends. At the end of the game, Buzz has a final battle with Stinky Pete (a.k.a. the Prospector) and two of his in-game henchmen. Contrary to the movie, defeating Stinky Pete is the end of the game.

GameplayEdit

Home console and computer versionEdit

The home console and computer version puts the player in control of Buzz Lightyear as he goes across fifteen levels (consisting of ten main levels and five boss levels) based on and inspired by locations from the film in order to rescue Woody. Buzz can attack enemies with a wrist laser, which can be charged up for additional power, and can also be aimed through a first-person viewpoint. Buzz also has a spin attack, which can be charged up into a continuous spin. Buzz is also able to extend his wings to perform a double jump, and can perform a foot stomp to activate switches. The player can pick up a laser power-up that gives Buzz a limited supply of powered up laser shots, as well as extra lives and health-replenishing batteries.[8][9][10][11][12][4]

The main aim of the game is to collect Pizza Planet tokens which are located throughout stages. Each level has 5 Pizza Planet tokens, which are each collected by completing different objectives, such as fighting a mini-boss, solving a puzzle, completing a timed challenge or winning a race against another character, or helping a character find five of a certain object which are hidden throughout a level. Each level also has a number of coins placed throughout it, 50 of which can be collected and given to Hamm for a token. Certain objectives require the use of a special power-up that must first be unlocked in a certain level by retrieving one of Mr. Potato Head's missing body parts. Power-ups include a barrier that protects Buzz from damage, rocket boots that launch him at high speeds, a disk launcher that homes in on enemies, a grappling hook for climbing up high ledges, and hover boots for floating up to high places. While only one Pizza Planet token is needed to clear a level, some levels require a certain number of tokens to unlock.[8][13][10][12][4] With the exception of the Nintendo 64 version, progressing through each level unlocks FMV clips of scenes taken from the film.[14][15][16] The Nintendo 64 version instead features screenshots from the film accompanied by text, shown in between levels. This is due to storage limitations of the Nintendo 64 cartridge.[8][17]

Game Boy Color versionEdit

The Game Boy Color version is a side-scrolling platform game unrelated to the other versions.[18] The player controls Buzz, who can jump, run, and shoot his laser at enemies. It features 11 levels, including two bonus levels that can be accessed if the player collects all the coins located in certain levels.[19][20] Because the Game Boy Color has only two action buttons, Buzz's running and jumping are both done through the B button. While standing motionless, the player can jump and move across gaps, whereas running is initiated by pressing the B button while moving. Gameplay is saved through a password feature.[18][21]

Development and releaseEdit

In July 1998, Activision licensed the rights to create a video game based on Toy Story 2.[22] The game, excluding the Game Boy Color version, was developed by Traveller's Tales and published by Activision.[15][23] Traveller's Tales had previously developed the original Toy Story video game.[15] The home console versions were released as Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue!, while versions for Microsoft Windows and Macintosh were released under the title Disney/Pixar's Action Game, Toy Story 2.[24] The Game Boy Color version, simply titled Toy Story 2, was developed by Tiertex Design Studios, which also developed the Game Boy version of the original Toy Story game.[19]

Development had been underway for some time as of March 1999.[25] The PlayStation and Nintendo 64 versions were unveiled at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in May 1999.[26] In the United States, the game was released for PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Windows, and Macintosh in November 1999, coinciding with the film's theatrical release.[27][28][24][29] The Game Boy Color version was published by THQ and was also released in the U.S. in November 1999.[20][18] In Europe, the PlayStation and Nintendo 64 versions were released on February 4, 2000.[6]

In January 2000, Activision announced that it would release a Dreamcast version in March.[30][31] The Dreamcast version was delayed and ultimately released in the U.S. in July 2000.[32][23] It is a port of the PlayStation version,[33] and was also developed by Traveller's Tales and published by Activision.[23]

In March 2011, Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue! was re-released through the PlayStation Network as a PS one Classic, available for download on PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable consoles.[34][35] In August 2012, it received a downloadable re-release for PlayStation Vita through the European PlayStation Store,[36] while a U.S. Vita re-release followed in January 2013.[37]

ControversyEdit

Following its initial release, the home console/computer version created controversy for its inclusion of a villain character whose design featured a mustache, a bullet bandolier and a sombrero. In late November 1999, a peaceful protest with more than 120 people was held outside Activision's headquarters by Hispanic activists who perceived the character as an offensive stereotype towards Mexicans.[38][39][40] Activision and Disney stated that the character's appearance would be altered in future copies of the game; there were no plans to recall or amend current copies.[39][40][41]

ReceptionEdit

Reception
Aggregate scores
AggregatorScore
GameRankingsPS: 75%[42]
N64: 62%[43]
Dreamcast: 59%[44]
MetacriticPS: 75/100[45]
N64: 58/100[46]
Dreamcast: 57/100[47]
Review scores
PublicationScore
AllGame     [48][8]
GBC:      [49]
Dreamcast:      [14]
EGMPS: 7.87/10[50]
Dreamcast: 5/10[51]
Game InformerPS: 8/10[15]
N64: 7.5/10[54]
GBC: 5.25/10[20]
Game RevolutionPS: C+[56]
Dreamcast: C[57]
N64: D[58]
GameFanN64: 57%[52]
Dreamcast: 47%[53]
GameProDreamcast:      [55]
GameSpotPS: 7.1/10[17]
GBC: 6.9/10[21]
N64: 6.5/10[13]
Dreamcast: 5.9/10[59]
GameSpyDreamcast: 6.5/10[11]
IGNPS: 7/10[9]
Dreamcast: 6/10[60]
N64: 5.9/10[10]
GBC: 5/10[18]
Nintendo PowerN64: 7.1/10[61]
OPM (US)PS:      [62]
PC ZoneWindows: 55%[16]
The Electric PlaygroundPS: 6.5/10[63]
Dreamcast: 5/10[64]
Entertainment WeeklyPS: A[24]
Windows: C[24]
MacAddictMacintosh: 3/5[65]
Next GenerationDreamcast:      [66]

The PlayStation version of Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue! received positive reviews, while the Nintendo 64 and Dreamcast versions received "Mixed or average reviews", according to aggregating review website Metacritic.[45][46][47] The home console/computer version was criticized for its awkward camera,[52][15][55][65][59][60][9][17][13][11][64][66] and the limited number of repetitive phrases used by non-playable characters throughout the game.[14][55][8][17][13][9][11] Critics praised the PlayStation version for its graphics and FMV clips, and considered it superior to the Nintendo 64 version, noting its lack of clips.[52][54][9][10][17][13] Levi Buchanan of GameFan called the PlayStation version "a wonderfully detailed" game with "bright, crisp graphics, incredible audio, and some fantastic movie cutscenes". Buchanan criticized the Nintendo 64 version for blurry textures and "abysmal" pop-up, and stated that the frame rate affected character animations. In addition, Buchanan criticized the Nintendo 64 version's sounds, music, and sluggish camera, and stated that the poor graphics hindered the gameplay.[52] Matt Casamassina of IGN also criticized the Nintendo 64 version's pop-up and frame rate, and stated that the game had "washed out visuals and a decidedly blurry look" in comparison to the PlayStation version; he believed that the latter version also had superior controls.[10] Chris Hudak of The Electric Playground praised the game's large levels but criticized them for not being interactive enough.[63]

Critics for Game Informer reviewed the PlayStation version and praised the FMV cutscenes and levels, but criticism was directed at the repetitive gameplay.[15] Game Informer praised the "enjoyable" gameplay of the Nintendo 64 version, but also considered it to be monotonous and too easy, while criticizing the lack of cutscenes.[54] AllGame's Brett Alan Weiss praised the PlayStation version for the camera, controls, level design, and the cutscenes, and stated that the character voices, "though redundant, are a plus." However, he considered the game too easy for hardcore gamers.[48] Glenn Wigmore of AllGame praised the Nintendo 64 version for its graphics, sound effects, and control, but was critical of the game's music, considering it to be repetitive.[8]

The Dreamcast version was criticized for its difficult controls,[14][55][67][66] including the overly sensitive analog stick, making it difficult to move Buzz in a straight line.[59][60] Miguel Lopez of GameSpot believed the Dreamcast version had "cleaner-looking" FMV clips but was disappointed that it was essentially the same game as the Nintendo 64 and PlayStation versions,[59] while IGN's Jeremy Dunham believed that the Dreamcast version had better graphics than the previous versions.[60] GamePro criticized the Dreamcast version for its graphics and monotonous music.[55] Jeremy Bell of AllGame called the Dreamcast version a "generic-looking dud" and considered the cutscenes to be the game's only "quality graphics". Bell criticized the game graphics for monotonous scenery and bland surface textures, and stated that the game had low resolution considering it was developed for the Dreamcast. Bell also criticized the unoriginal gameplay.[14] PlanetDreamcast praised the game's film clips, but criticized its VMU interface, and stated that the game would only appeal to young children.[11] Greg Orlando of Next Generation called the Dreamcast version a "shoddy port" with graphics "barely better" than the PlayStation version,[66] while Shaun Conlin of The Electric Playground called it "a port of a game that wasn't very good in the first place."[64]

Noah Robischon of Entertainment Weekly criticized the Windows version for installation problems.[24] PC Zone wrote that while the game did not reinvigorate the platform genre, it was "definitely a cut above most merchandising tie-ins."[16] Cathy Lu of MacAddict reviewed the Macintosh version and considered it to be addictive. Lu praised the graphics, but criticized clipping problems and the jerky camera, as well as high system requirements to play the game.[65]

It was among the top 10 best-selling PlayStation games of December 1999.[68] The PlayStation version received a "Gold" sales award from the Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (ELSPA),[69] indicating sales of at least 200,000 copies in the United Kingdom.[70]

Game Boy Color versionEdit

The Game Boy Color version was considered average,[49][20][18] with Game Informer criticizing its lack of originality.[20] It was also criticized for its control setup with regards to running and jumping;[20][21] IGN's Craig Harris wrote that, "Granted, you can't do much with only two action buttons, but it's obvious Tiertex wanted three."[18] Doug Trueman of GameSpot praised Buzz's animation but stated that many of the other toys in the game did not look as good. Trueman considered the sound and music to be average, and stated that background graphics often blended in too well with the foreground.[21]

Weiss called the Game Boy Color version an "adequate, but very forgettable and very short game," while saying it can become quickly tedious. Weiss believed the addition of boss enemies and more action would have helped, although he considered the animation and artwork to be above average for a Game Boy Color game.[49] Game Informer stated that the Game Boy Color version had "okay" graphics.[20]

THQ president and CEO Brian Farrell said the game was a hit for THQ during Q4 of 1999.[71]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Credits for the home console/computer version:[1][2][3][4]

ReferencesEdit

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  3. ^ "Credits". Toy Story 2: Buzz Lightyear to the Rescue! instruction manual (Dreamcast). Activision. 2000. pp. 17–19. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  4. ^ a b c Traveller's Tales (1999). Disney/Pixar's Action Game, Toy Story 2. Activision.
  5. ^ a b "Toy Story 2 credits (Game Boy Color)". AllGame. Archived from the original on 15 November 2014. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  6. ^ a b c "Game Guide". Computer Trade Weekly. No. 775. United Kingdom. 4 February 2000. p. 21.
  7. ^ "News Briefs". IGN. 22 November 1999. Archived from the original on 31 August 2000. Retrieved 25 October 2019.
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External linksEdit