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Thomas Beverley Evans Jr. (born November 5, 1931) is an American lawyer and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. He is a member of the Republican Party, who served three terms as U.S. Representative from Delaware.

Thomas B. Evans Jr.
Thomas B. Evans, Jr..jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Delaware's At-large district
In office
January 3, 1977 – January 3, 1983
Preceded byPete du Pont
Succeeded byTom Carper
Personal details
Born
Thomas Beverley Evans Jr.

(1931-11-05) November 5, 1931 (age 87)
Nashville, Tennessee
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Mary Page Evans
ResidenceWilmington, Delaware
Alma materUniversity of Virginia
Professionlawyer

Early life and familyEdit

Evans was born in Nashville, Tennessee, attended the public schools of Old Hickory, Tennessee and Seaford, Delaware, and graduated from Woodberry Forest School in Orange, Virginia in 1947. He then graduated from the University of Virginia in 1953, where he was a member of St. Elmo Hall and the University of Virginia Law School in 1956.

Professional careerEdit

Evans was admitted to the Virginia Bar in 1956, then engaged in the insurance and mortgage brokerage business in Wilmington, Delaware from 1957 until 1968. He served in the Delaware National Guard from 1956 until 1960, as clerk to the Chief Justice of Delaware Supreme Court in 1955, as director of the Delaware State Development Department from 1969 until 1970, and co-chairman and chief operating officer of the Republican National Committee from 1971 until 1973.

He was a member of law firm of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips in Washington, D.C. He also served as Chairman of the Florida Coalition for Preservation, a not-for-profit organization formed in April 2007 to promote responsible growth and protect coastal barrier islands through the education of the public and other concerned groups.

United States RepresentativeEdit

Evans was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1976, defeating Democrat Samuel L. Shipley. He won election three times in all, also defeating Democrats Gary E. Hindes in 1978 and Robert L. Maxwell in 1980. During these three terms, he served in the Republican minority in the 95th, 96th and 97th Congress. He came to the U.S. Congress already a friend of U.S. Senator Bob Dole, and later became a friend of United States President Ronald Reagan. He served on the U.S. House Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs and the U.S House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. Passionate about the environment, Evans co-authored the Coastal Barrier Resources Act and the Alaska Wilderness Preservation Act. He also co authored the Evans-Tsongas Act. In 2016, the National Wildlife Federation gave Evans a Conservation Leadership Award [1] for these achievements.

Evans was involved in a scandal involving lobbyist and former nude model Paula Parkinson, in which allegations were made that she traded sex for political influence. The US Department of Justice investigated the allegations and found no evidence of any crimes.[2] Evans was defeated in his attempt at a fourth term in 1982.[3] In all, Evans served from January 3, 1977 until January 3, 1983, during the administrations of U.S. Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.

AlmanacEdit

Elections are held the first Tuesday after November 1. U.S. Representatives take office January 3 and have a two-year term.

Public Offices
Office Type Location Began office Ended office notes
U.S. Representative Legislature Washington January 3, 1977 January 3, 1979
U.S. Representative Legislature Washington January 3, 1979 January 3, 1981
U.S. Representative Legislature Washington January 3, 1981 January 3, 1983
United States Congressional service
Dates Congress Chamber Majority President Committees Class/District
1977–1979 95th U.S. House Democratic Jimmy Carter at-large
1979–1981 96th U.S. House Democratic Jimmy Carter at-large
1981–1983 97th U.S. House Democratic Ronald Reagan at-large
Election results
Year Office Election Subject Party Votes % Opponent Party Votes %
1976 U.S. Representative General Tom Evans Republican 110,677 51% Sam Shipley Democratic 102,431 48%
1978 U.S. Representative General Tom Evans Republican 91,689 59% Gary Hindes Democratic 64,863 41%
1980 U.S. Representative General Tom Evans Republican 133,842 62% Bob Maxwell Democratic 81,227 38%
1982 U.S. Representative General Tom Evans Republican 87,153 46% Tom Carper Democratic 98,533 52%

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazines/Media-Center/News-by-Topic/General-NWF/2016/6-20-16-NWF-Honors-Rep-Thomas-Evans-Conservation-Leadership-Award.aspx
  2. ^ "Inquiry Fildes No Evidence Parkinson Influenced Votes", The Washington Post (1974-Current file); Sep 24, 1981; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Washington Post (187 pg. A26)
  3. ^ Melinda Henneberger, "Starting Over," New York Times Magazine, April 4, 1999; Beth Barrett, "The Fling He Never Had Returns to Haunt Quayle," Toronto Star, August 28, 1988; Jeannie Williams, Paula Parkinson's D.C. Return a Sad Affair," USA Today, Jan. 19, 1989, D2.

External linksEdit