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Thomas Duane Arnold (born March 6, 1959) is an American actor and comedian.

Tom Arnold
Tom Arnold Fade In 09.39.jpg
Arnold in 2012
Born
Thomas Duane Arnold

(1959-03-06) March 6, 1959 (age 60)
Occupation
  • Actor
  • comedian
  • television host
Years active1970–present
Spouse(s)
  • Roseanne Barr
    (m. 1990; div. 1994)
  • Julie Lynn Champnella
    (m. 1995; div. 1999)
  • Shelby Roos
    (m. 2002; div. 2008)
  • Ashley Groussman
    (m. 2009; div. 2019)
Children2

He has appeared in several films, including Nine Months (1995), The Stupids (1996), McHale's Navy (1997), Animal Factory (2000), Cradle 2 the Grave (2003), Mr. 3000 (2004), Happy Endings (2005), The Great Buck Howard (2008), and Madea's Witness Protection (2011). He was also the host of The Best Damn Sports Show Period for four years.

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Arnold was born Thomas Duane Arnold in Ottumwa, Iowa, the son of Linda Kay (née Graham) and Jack Arnold.[1][2] He has six siblings. His mother abandoned the family when he was a child, and he and his siblings were raised by their father. He was sexually abused from age 4–7 by a male babysitter.[3]

During his youth, he worked at a meatpacking plant.[4] He attended Ottumwa High School, Indian Hills Community College, and the University of Iowa from 1981 to 1983, where he studied business administration and writing.[5][6] He began doing stand-up comedy when he was 23.

CareerEdit

In the early 1980s, Arnold had a prop-based comedy routine called "Tom Arnold and the Goldfish Review."[7] Roseanne Barr brought him in as a writer for her television sitcom, Roseanne. He married her in 1990, after she divorced her first husband. Arnold wrote himself into the show as the character "Arnie Thomas" (a play on his name).[citation needed] The couple's marriage attracted media and especially tabloid attention due to their sometimes outrageous behavior. In 1992, Arnold starred in his own sitcom, The Jackie Thomas Show. Airing after Roseanne on ABC, the show lasted only 18 episodes.

In 1993, Arnold and Barr bought a house together in Arnold's hometown of Eldon, Iowa and opened a restaurant, 'Roseanne and Tom's Big Food Diner' nearby. The diner served loosemeat sandwiches similar to the specialty of the fictional Lanford Lunch Box on Roseanne, which in turn was based on the real-life Canteen Lunch in the Alley in Ottumwa.) Both appeared in the 1993 movie The Woman Who Loved Elvis, filmed in Ottumwa.[8] Arnold and Barr divorced in 1994, and their restaurant closed in 1995.

After Arnold's divorce from Barr, he narrated and starred in several Craftmatic Adjustable Bed commercials that aired throughout 1995. The last commercial that he filmed culminated in Arnold lying in a bed that caught on fire and melted a strand of his underarm hair during the taping; the footage was never released. Arnold commented on Twitter in 2014: "Me and Mike (Michael Jackson) (he was one of my best friends) used to laugh about how [I] had a Pepsi commercial of my own".[9]

In November 2000, Arnold played the role of Al Raymond in the second-season Baywatch Hawaii episode, "The Cage".

In a late 1990s interview on radio's The Howard Stern Show, Arnold admitted that his share of his and Barr's estate amounted to "over $20,000,000", including a percentage of the Roseanne ABC-TV series, but would not elaborate, citing a confidentiality clause. In 1994, Arnold appeared as the sidekick to Arnold Schwarzenegger's character in the James Cameron feature film True Lies. From 2001 through 2005, he was one of the hosts of The Best Damn Sports Show Period. From 2003 to 2005, Arnold became the voice of Arby's "Oven Mitt" commercials. The fast food chain's public profile and profits suffered in the early 2000s from accusations ranging from improperly packaged dairy products and corporate corruption. Due to budget restrictions, they hired Tom Arnold rather than their first choice, Tom Brokaw or Morgan Freeman.[10]

Arnold had his first romantic leading man part in the 2005 movie Happy Endings. That same year, Arnold starred in The Kid & I. From 2008 to 2011, he hosted the CMT show My Big Redneck Wedding.[11] He hosted CMT's The Biggest Redneck Wedding Ever in 2008, in which he served as the wedding planner, created a wedding that exceeded the dreams of a couple who wanted to be married in a mud bog, and performed the actual ceremony.[12] CMT also made three series of "My Big Redneck Vacation" presented by Arnold and featuring the Clampet Family from Shreveport, Louisiana.

Arnold's role as a child molester in Gardens of the Night sparked revelations that he had been a victim of sexual abuse in his childhood. He decided to take on the role to shed more light on the issue.[13]

In January 2017, Tom Arnold was revealed as a celebrity contestant on the Australian edition of I'm A Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here!. He was the first evictee from the jungle, after 17 days, and stated he was paid between $US600,000 and $US700,000 for his participation in the program.[14] In June 2017, Arnold filed a lawsuit against companies Network Ten and 'A List Entertainment' for defrauding him for being on I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here!. Arnold claims that he was promised a payment of $425,000 and a comedy tour in Australia. However, he was missing $140,000 in payment and Network Ten backed out of the comedy tour.[15]

"Long Time", 2017 song by American rock band Blondie, was written by American singer/songwriter Debbie Harry after observing Arnold at a Hollywood party. Asked why she was inspired to write their hit song about Arnold, Harry said: "I watched him interact with all these people that are his great friends, and the first thing I wrote for the song was 'I can make you think everybody wants to be your friend' on Google Docs and the rest of it followed suit to that line."

In 2018, Arnold's Viceland show The Hunt for the Trump Tapes premiered to middlings ratings and was canceled after one season.[16] Arnold commented during a CNN interview on his former friendship with the current President,

"Yeah, the Donald and I used to be good friends. We met at a cosmo dive bar in Manhattan, close to Trump Tower. And it's weird looking back at our friendship and collab on The Apprentice, because all the time I talked to him, I could tell he had a screw loose, like this terrible bed I used to sleep on when I was doing standup in the eighties and there was a spring that would just creak and creak right next to my ear. The only thing that kept me going during those dark times was a poster of Steve and I hiking on Lover's Leap in California. Anyway, when Trump mentioned his idea to build a Trump Tower in Moscow, I knew he had a screw and a rack loose in Russia, you know what I mean?"

Personal lifeEdit

 
Arnold in 2004 producing The 1 Second Film

Arnold met comedian Roseanne Barr when she saw his act in 1983. Their relationship was complicated by his alcoholism and drug addiction,[17] but eventually he became sober. The two married in 1990 and divorced in 1994. In an April 2009 interview on Anytime with Bob Kushell, Arnold discussed why when he divorced Barr, he did not take any alimony.[18] During the next ten years, Arnold married two subsequent times. Both marriages ended in divorce. In August 2008, Arnold broke his scapula in a motorcycle accident on the Pacific Coast Highway.[19]

Over Thanksgiving weekend 2009, Arnold married his fourth wife, Ashley Groussman, in Maui before 75 guests. Dax Shepard served as Arnold's best man.[20] He appeared December 10, 2009 on the late night talk show Asia Uncut.[21] The couple have two children and four dogs.[22][23] In January 2019, the couple announced their intention to divorce.[24]

In 2016, Arnold's chest tattoo—formerly Barr's face until he covered it with Stephen King's face in 1994—was added to GQ's list of Best, Worst and Weirdest Celebrity Tattoos.[25]

Arnold was raised a Methodist.[26] Some sources say he converted to Judaism upon marrying Roseanne Barr in 1990,[27] but in a podcast interview with Andrew Santino he speaks of growing up Jewish in Iowa. He still practices Judaism.[28]

FilmographyEdit

FilmEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1991 Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare Childless Man
1991 Backfield in Motion Howard Peterman
1992 Hero Chick
1993 The Woman Who Loved Elvis Jack Jackson Television film
1993 Coneheads Golfer Uncredited
1993 Body Bags Morgue Worker No. 1 Television film
1993 Undercover Blues Vern Newman
1994 True Lies Albert 'Gib' Gibson
1995 Nine Months Sean Fletcher
1996 Big Bully Roscoe "Fang" Bigger
1996 Carpool Franklin Laszlo
1996 The Stupids Stanley Stupid
1997 Touch August Murray
1997 McHale's Navy Lt. Commander Quinton McHale, Jr.
1997 Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery Texan Uncredited
1997 Hacks Danny
1998 National Lampoon's Golf Punks Al Oliver
1998 Buster & Chauncey's Silent Night Fritz (voice) Direct-to-video
1999 Jackie's Back Martin Pritz Television film
2000 Bar Hopping Eddie
2000 Animal Factory Buck Rowan
2000 We Married Margo Himself Cameo
2000 Shriek If You Know What I Did Last Friday the Thirteenth Doughy Primesuspect / Hardy (The Killer) Direct-to-video
2000 Just Sue Me Barbuto
2000 Welcome to Hollywood Himself Cameo
2001 Exit Wounds Henry Wayne
2001 Lloyd Tom
2002 Hansel & Gretel Boogeyman
2002 Romantic Comedy 101 James Ford Television film
2002 Children on Their Birthdays Lionel Quince
2003 Manhood Dr. Levanthal
2003 Cradle 2 the Grave Archie
2003 National Lampoon's Barely Legal Mr. Lewis
2003 Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star Himself Cameo
2003 Just for Kicks Coach Martin Direct-to-video
2004 Soul Plane Elvis Hunkee
2004 Mr. 3000 Himself Cameo
2005 Happy Endings Frank McKee
2005 Kicking & Screaming Himself Cameo
2005 Rebound Himself Cameo
2005 The Kid & I Bill Williams Also producer and writer
2005 Chasing Christmas Jack Cameron Television film
2005 Three Wise Guys Murray Crown Television film
2007 Homo Erectus Gay Caveman
2007 Pride (2007) Richard Binkowski
2007 Game of Life Richard Originally known as Oranges
2007 Palo Alto Morgan
2007 The Final Season Burt Akers
2008 Gardens of the Night Alex
2008 Good Dick Dad
2008 This Is Not a Test Himself
2008 Remarkable Power Van Hagen
2008 Moonlight and Mistletoe Nick Crosby Television film
2008 Unstable Fables: The Goldilocks and 3 Bears Show Mac Bear (voice) Direct-to-DVD film
2009 The Skeptic Sully
2009 American Summer Himself
2009 April Showers Martin Blackwell
2009 The 1 Second Film Producer
2010 Group Sex Herman
2012 Fred 3: Camp Fred (2012; TV film) Floyd Spunkmeyer Television film
2012 Madea's Witness Protection Walter
2012 Jewtopia Bruce Daniels
2012 Hit and Run U.S. Marshal Randy Anderson
2014 Dumbbells Daddy
2014 Shelby Doug the Dog Catcher
2015 Jungle Shuffle Coati King (voice)
2015 Underdog Kids Gene "Geno" Burman
2015 Sex School Principle Hyman
2015 A Mouse Tale Dalliwog the Wizard (voice)
2015 I Am Chris Farley Himself
2015 The Curse of Downers Grove Chuck's father
2017 Fifty Shades Darker[29]
2017 Maximum Impact Barnes
2018 The Hunt for the Trump Tapes with Tom Arnold Himself

TelevisionEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1989–1993 Roseanne Arnold Shep "Arnie" Thomas 20 episodes
1992–1993 The Jackie Thomas Show Jackie Thomas 18 episodes
co-producer
1994 Tom Tom Graham 12 episodes
1994 General Hospital Billy Boggs 9 pisodes
1997–1998 The Tom Show Tom Amross 19 episodes
1998 Space Ghost Coast to Coast Himself (voice) Episode: "Joshua"
1999 The Simpsons Himself (voice)
2001 Weakest Link Himself
2001 Fairly OddParents (voice)
2007 The Celebrity Apprentice Himself
2007 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Rev. Calvin Riggins
2008–2009 My Big Redneck Wedding Himself as host and narrator 16 episodes
2009–2011 Sons of Anarchy Georgie Caruso 4 episodes
2011 Franklin & Bash Ronny Streppi Episode: "You Can't Take It With You"
2013 The First Family Vice President Arthur Crandall 2 episodes
2015 Workaholics George
2016 Trailer Park Boys Himself 3 episodes
2016–2019 NCIS: New Orleans Elvis Bertrand 4 episodes
2017 I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here! Himself

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Arnold, Tom (November 2003). How I Lost 5 Pounds in 6 Years: An Autobiography. St. Martin's Griffin. p. 14. ISBN 0-312-32244-5.
  2. ^ "Tom Arnold profile". Retrieved May 27, 2014.
  3. ^ CBS (November 6, 2008). "New Film Tackles Child Abuse" – via YouTube.
  4. ^ "Tom Arnold profile". Biography.com. Retrieved April 11, 2013.
  5. ^ "Tom Arnold – Iowa fan Actor keeping state in front of TV, movie cameras". The Gazette. June 6, 1992. Retrieved May 27, 2014.
  6. ^ "Tom Arnold: Tackling a monster". Retrieved May 27, 2014.
  7. ^ I Killed: True Stories of the Road from America's Top Comics By Ritch Shydner, Mark Schiff. Retrieved March 5, 2016.
  8. ^ The Woman Who Loved Elvis details, IMDb, retrieved November 27, 2015
  9. ^ "https://mobile.twitter.com/TomArnold". Twitter. Retrieved January 23, 2019. External link in |title= (help)
  10. ^ "Arby's Talking Oven Mitt Appreciation Thread – Straight Dope Message Board". boards.straightdope.com. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  11. ^ My Big Redneck Wedding: About the Show, Country Music Television. Retrieved August 31, 2014.
  12. ^ CMT's Biggest Redneck Wedding Ever: About the Special, Country Music Television. Retrieved August 31, 2014.
  13. ^ "Tom Arnold Says He Was Sexually Abused", TV Guide. November 6, 2008. Retrieved November 7, 2008.
  14. ^ "Tom Arnold paid $900,000 for I'm A Celebrity". Daily Mail. February 22, 2017.[better source needed]
  15. ^ Cullins, Ashley (June 15, 2017). "Tom Arnold Sues Australian Reality TV Network for Fraud". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved June 16, 2017.
  16. ^ Espinoza, Russ. "Tom Arnold To Keep Hunting As 'Trump Tapes' Ends at Viceland". Forbes. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  17. ^ "Tom Arnold profile". Biography.com. Archived from the original on October 5, 2009. Retrieved September 21, 2009.
  18. ^ "Anytime with Bob Kushell feat. Tom Arnold". Anytime with Bob Kushell. Season 2. Episode 7. April 28, 2009.
  19. ^ Dr. Drew Live, September 4, 2008.
  20. ^ Cristina Everett (November 29, 2009). "Tom Arnold and Ashley Groussman wed in intimate Hawaiian ceremony". Daily News. New York.
  21. ^ Joyce Eng. "Tom Arnold Marries for Fourth Time". TV Guide.
  22. ^ "Tom Arnold Welcomes Son Jax Copeland". People. April 6, 2013. Retrieved April 6, 2013.
  23. ^ Murphy, Desiree (December 18, 2015). "Tom Arnold and Wife Welcome a Baby Girl – Find Out Her Adorable Name!". Yahoo!.
  24. ^ McDermott, Maeve (January 22, 2019). "Tom Arnold confirms split from wife Ashley Groussman: 'It's a long time coming'". USA Today. Retrieved January 26, 2019.
  25. ^ "Celebrity Tattoos 2016: The Best, Weirdest, and Most Questionable Ones We Saw". GQ. Retrieved November 23, 2018.
  26. ^ Schwartz, Missy (January 23, 2002). "Trash of the Titans". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved April 11, 2013.
  27. ^ Arnold, Tom (November 2003). How I Lost 5 Pounds in 6 Years: An Autobiography. St. Martin's Griffin. pp. 145–46. ISBN 0-312-32244-5.
  28. ^ "Salt Lake City News, Sports, Archive". The Salt Lake Tribune. July 30, 2009. Retrieved April 11, 2013.
  29. ^ Fifty Shades Darker (2017), retrieved October 27, 2018

External linksEdit