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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Columbus, Georgia, US.

Contents

19th centuryEdit

  • 1828
  • 1829 - Baptist Church established.[3]
  • 1830 - Population: 1,152.
  • 1834 - Columbus Factory (textiles) in business.[4]
  • 1836 - Columbus becomes "center of military operations" against the Creek during the Creek War of 1836, fought nearby.[1]
  • 1840 - Wynnton School built (approximate date).[1]
  • 1846 - Fire.
  • 1847 - Columbus Board of Trade founded.
  • 1850 - Columbus Times newspaper begins publication.[2]
  • 1853
  • 1860 - Population: 9,621.[6]
  • 1865 - April 16: Battle of Columbus; Union forces win.[1]
  • 1868 - Eagle & Phenix Mill in operation.[7][8]
  • 1869 - Muscogee Mills in business.[9]
  • 1870 - Bethel Baptist Church built (approximate date).[10]
  • 1871
  • 1879 - Confederate Monument erected.[11]
  • 1880 - Population: 10,123.
  • 1886
    • Columbus Evening Ledger newspaper begins publication.[2]
    • Future singer Ma Rainey born in Columbus.[11]
  • 1887
    • Columbus Messenger newspaper begins publication.
    • Synagogue dedicated.[12]
  • 1900 - Population: 17,614.

20th centuryEdit

21st centuryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Federal Writers' Project 1940.
  2. ^ a b c d "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Hellmann 2005.
  4. ^ White 1849.
  5. ^ Americana 1912.
  6. ^ a b c d Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998
  7. ^ Willoughby 1999.
  8. ^ "Chattahoochee Heritage Project". Alabama: Auburn University. Retrieved September 14, 2016.
  9. ^ a b Byrne 1997.
  10. ^ a b c d e f "Finding Aids". Columbus State University Archives. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  11. ^ a b "Research". Historic Columbus Foundation. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  12. ^ "Columbus, Georgia". Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities. Jackson, Mississippi: Goldring / Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  13. ^ a b c "Movie Theaters in Columbus, GA". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  14. ^ "Membership: Georgia", Report...1917 and 1918, New York: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1919
  15. ^ Jack Alicoate, ed. (1939), "Standard Broadcasting Stations of the United States: Georgia", Radio Annual, New York: Radio Daily, OCLC 2459636
  16. ^ Stephen G. N. Tuck (2001). Beyond Atlanta: The Struggle for Racial Equality in Georgia, 1940-1980. University of Georgia Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-2528-6.
  17. ^ "History". Junior League of Columbus, GA. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  18. ^ Charles A. Alicoate, ed. (1960), "Television Stations: Georgia", Radio Annual and Television Year Book, New York: Radio Daily Corp., OCLC 10512206
  19. ^ Lupold 1979a.
  20. ^ a b Lupold 1979b.
  21. ^ "Georgia". Official Congressional Directory. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1983 – via HathiTrust.
  22. ^ Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack. Washington DC. Retrieved September 13, 2016.
  23. ^ "Columbus, Georgia Home Page". Archived from the original on November 1, 1996 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  24. ^ Kevin Hyde; Tamie Hyde (eds.). "United States of America: Georgia". Official City Sites. Utah. OCLC 40169021. Archived from the original on December 7, 1998.
  25. ^ "Columbus city, Georgia". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved September 13, 2016.

BibliographyEdit

External linksEdit