Tilskueren (Danish: the Spectator) was a monthly cultural and literary magazine published in Copenhagen, Denmark, between 1884 and 1939. It was continuation of another magazine, Det nittende Aarhundrede (Danish: the Nineteenth Century), which was founded by Georg and Edvard Brandes.[1] The subtitle of Tilskueren was Maanedsskrift for Litteratur, Samfundsspørgsmaal og almenfattelige videnskabelige Skildringer (Danish: Monthly for Literature, Public Matters, and Popular Scientific Descriptions).[1]

Tilskueren
EditorValdemar Vedel
Poul Levin
Axel Garde
CategoriesCultural magazine
Literary magazine
FrequencyMonthly
FounderNiels Neergaard
Year founded1884
Final issue1939
CountryDenmark
Based inCopenhagen
LanguageDanish
OCLC1767496

History and profileEdit

Tilskueren was established in 1884.[1][2][3] The founder and first editor was Niels Neergaard, future prime minister of Denmark.[1] The magazine had its headquarters in Copenhagen.[4] Tilskueren significantly influenced the Finnish cultural magazine, Valvoja.[5]

Georg Brandes, Martinus Galschiøt and Johannes Jørgensen were among the contributors.[1][2][6] Johannes Jørgensen who would launch an arts and literary magazine in October 1893, namely Taarnet, published a manifesto on his approach towards symbolism in the magazine.[7] Tilskueren also contained the articles by Jørgensen on Charles Baudelaire and Edgar Allan Poe among others.[8] Several short stories by Karen Blixen were first published in the monthly.[9] Tom Kristensen started his career as a literary reviewer and critic in Tilskueren in May 1923.[10] An excerpt from Amalie Skram's first novel, Constance Ring, was published in the magazine in 1885.[11]

Valdemar Vedel and Poul Levin served as the editors of the magazine.[1][12] From 1930 to 1939 the magazine was edited by Axel Garde.[1] In 1939 the magazine ceased publication.[1][2][3]

See alsoEdit

List of magazines in Denmark

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Bjarne Søndergaard Bendtsen (2013). "Copenhagen: From the Ivory Tower to Street Activism". In Peter Brooker; et al. (eds.). The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines: Europe 1880 - 1940. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 622. ISBN 978-0-19-965958-6.
  2. ^ a b c Jan Sjåvik (2006). Historical Dictionary of Scandinavian Literature and Theater. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. p. 228. ISBN 978-0-8108-6501-3.
  3. ^ a b Sven H. Rossel (1992). A History of Danish Literature. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press. p. 266. ISBN 978-0-8032-3886-2.
  4. ^ Richard A. Cardwell, ed. (2004). The Reception of Byron in Europe. A&C Black. p. 491. ISBN 978-0-8264-6844-4.
  5. ^ Glenda Dawn Goss (Summer 2003). "A Backdrop for Young Sibelius: The Intellectual Genesis of the Kullervo Symphony". 19th-Century Music. 27 (1): 57. doi:10.1525/ncm.2003.27.1.48.
  6. ^ "Georg Brandes still Sticks to Neutrality" (PDF). The New York Times. 26 March 1916. Retrieved 9 May 2015.
  7. ^ Lief Sjőberg (1984). "Symbolism in Denmark". In Anna Balakian (ed.). The Symbolist Movement in the Literature of European Languages. Amsterdam; Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins. p. 589. doi:10.1075/chlel.ii. ISBN 978-90-272-8642-0.
  8. ^ David J. Mickelsen (December 1977). "Beating Frenchmen into Swords: Symbolism in Denmark". Comparative Literature Studies. 14 (4): 328–345. JSTOR 40245910.
  9. ^ "Posthumous Publications". Blixen. Archived from the original on 16 October 2015. Retrieved 9 May 2015.
  10. ^ Michael S. Byram (1973). The Novels of Tom Kristensen (PhD thesis). University of Cambridge. doi:10.17863/CAM.15906.
  11. ^ Aina Nøding (2014). "Periodical Fiction in Denmark and Norway before 1900". In Paula Rabinowitz (ed.). Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Literature. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190201098.013.293. ISBN 978-0-19-020109-8.
  12. ^ "Dinesen, Isak". Gale Contextual Encyclopedia of World Literature. 2009.