The Last Song (Elton John song)

"The Last Song" is the second single from the 1992 album, The One, recorded and released by Elton John. It was composed by John, with lyrics provided by Bernie Taupin. "The Last Song" marked the first of John's American singles to benefit his AIDS foundation. Taupin faxed the lyrics to him in Paris, shortly after Queen lead singer Freddie Mercury had died the previous year. 'I was crying all the time as I wrote the music', John told The Advocate, 'and it was very hard for me to sing it.' The song tells of an estranged father coming to terms with the sexuality of his gay son, who is dying of an AIDS-related illness. Originally titled "Song for 1992", it was renamed to avoid dating it.[1]

"The Last Song"
Elton John The Last Song.jpg
UK 7-inch cover
Single by Elton John
from the album The One
B-side"The Man Who Never Died" (Remix)
Released
  • 6 October 1992 (US)
  • November 1992 (UK)
Recorded1991–1992
GenreAdult contemporary
Length3:21
Label
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)Chris Thomas
Elton John singles chronology
"Runaway Train"
(1992)
"The Last Song"
(1992)
"Simple Life"
(1993)

"The Last Song" reached No. 7 in Canada and No. 21 in the United Kingdom, while peaking within the Top 40 in several countries worldwide, including Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, and the United States. A music video, directed by Gus Van Sant, was made for the song, but he was not the first director considered; David Hockney and Madonna had previously declined the offer.

PersonnelEdit

ChartsEdit

In popular cultureEdit

"The Last Song" was used during a closing montage at the end of the 1993 film And the Band Played On, which featured images of notable people who had contracted AIDS. It has also been mentioned numerous times on The Howard Stern Show; whose producer Gary Dell'Abate said that the song and music video reminded him of his brother, who died of AIDS around the time The One was released. When they first played the song on the air, Dell'Abate broke out in tears during the first verse.[19]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bernardin, C. and Stanton, T. Rocket Man: The Encyclopedia of Elton John, pp 182-183, Greenwood Press, 1995
  2. ^ "Australian-charts.com – Elton John – The Last Song". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  3. ^ "Ultratop.be – Elton John – The Last Song" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  4. ^ "Top RPM Singles: Issue 1840." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  5. ^ "Top RPM Adult Contemporary: Issue 1854." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  6. ^ "Eurochart Hot 100 Singles" (PDF). Music & Media. Vol. 9 no. 48. 28 November 1992. p. 27. Retrieved 5 May 2020.
  7. ^ "Offiziellecharts.de – Elton John – The Last Song" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  8. ^ "The Irish Charts – Search Results – The Last Song". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  9. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – week 48, 1992" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40 Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  10. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Elton John – The Last Song" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  11. ^ "Charts.nz – Elton John – The Last Song". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  12. ^ "Notowanie nr570" (in Polish). LP3. 15 January 1993. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  13. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  14. ^ "Elton John Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  15. ^ "Elton John Chart History (Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  16. ^ "The RPM Top 100 Adult Contemporary tracks of 1992". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  17. ^ "The RPM Top 100 Hit Tracks of 1993". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  18. ^ "The RPM Top 100 A\C Tracks of 1993". RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  19. ^ Dell'Abate, Gary (31 May 2011). They Call Me Baba Booey, Spiegel & Grau. p 159. Archived at Google Books. Retrieved 2 October 2015.