Television presenter

  (Redirected from TV show host)

A television presenter (often referred to as a television personality or television host) is a person who introduces or hosts television programs, often serving as a mediator for the program and the audience. Nowadays, it is common for people who garnered fame in other fields to take on this role, but some people have made their name solely within the field of presenting—such as children's television series or infomercials—to become television personalities.[1][2]

RolesEdit

Some presenters may double as an actor, model, singer, comedian, etc. Others may be subject matter experts, such as scientists or politicians, serving as presenters for a programme about their field of expertise (for instance, David Attenborough). Some are celebrities who have made their name in one area, then leverage their fame to get involved in other areas.

Examples of this latter group include British comedian Michael Palin who now presents programmes about travel (such as Around the World in 80 Days), and American actor Alan Alda, who presented Scientific American Frontiers for over a decade.[3] Another example would be American stand-up comedian Joe Rogan, who is a commentator and post-fight interviewer in UFC. Prior to entering politics, former U.S. President Donald Trump served as a presenter for live shows such as Saturday Night Live and his own show The Apprentice, after being famed for his exuberant lifestyle and business finesse. The term is commonly used in many countries including Canada, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Liechtenstein, Barbados, Sri Lanka, India, Spain, Denmark, Greece, Australia, Egypt, Andorra, Malta, San Marino, Japan and South Korea.

United StatesEdit

In the US, such a person is typically called a host, such as in the terminology talk show host, or an MC (Master of ceremonies). In the context of TV news programs, they are known as anchors.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "TV presenter Donna Air joins Pippa Middleton's fan club". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2013-07-23.
  2. ^ "Dimbleby criticises ageism in TV". itv.com. 2013-05-28. Retrieved 2013-07-23.
  3. ^ "Alan Alda, on season 4". Scientific American Frontiers. Chedd-Angier Production Company. 1993–1994. PBS. Archived from the original on 2006.