Syro-Malabar Catholic Eparchy of Melbourne

The St. Thomas the Apostle Syro-Malabar Catholic Eparchy of Melbourne is a Syro-Malabar Catholic Church ecclesiastical territory or eparchy of the Catholic Church in Australia. The eparchy was erected by Pope Francis on 11 January 2014. This is the second eparchy of the Syro-Malabar Church outside India, after the Eparchy of Chicago, and it has jurisdiction over Syro-Malabar Catholics in the entirety of Australia.[1]

Eparchy of Saint Thomas the Apostle of Melbourne (Syro-Malabar)
Location
CountryAustralia
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
Sui iuris churchSyro-Malabar Catholic Church
RiteEast Syriac Rite
Established11 January 2014
CathedralSt. Alphonsa Cathedral
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
Major ArchbishopGeorge Alencherry
EparchBosco Puthur
Website
http://syromalabar.org.au

It is not part of any ecclesiastical province, but immediately subject to the Major Archbishop of Ernakulam-Angamaly and depends on the Roman Congregation for the Oriental Churches. Its ordinary is also appointed permanent Apostolic Visitator for the Syro-Malabar Catholics in New Zealand, where they have no established jurisdiction. Its future cathedral is the Cathedral of St. Alphonsa in the episcopal see of Melbourne, Victoria.

HistoryEdit

The eparchy was approved on 23 December 2013 as the Eparchy of Saint Thomas the Apostle of Melbourne, on Australian territory previously without a formal jurisdiction of the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church.

StatisticsEdit

As of 2014, it pastorally served 50,000 Catholics with 17 priests (5 diocesan, 12 religious), 12 lay religious (brothers).

OrdinariesEdit

Eparchs (Bishops)

The first and current bishop of the eparchy is Bosco Puthur, appointed by Pope Francis in 2014, [2] born in India 1946.05.28, ordained Priest 1971.03.27, consecrated Bishop 2010.02.13; previously Titular Bishop of Foratiana (2010.01.18 – 2013.12.23) as Bishop of Curia of the Syro-Malabars (2010.01.18 – 2013.12.23); permanent Apostolic Visitator to Syro-Malabar Faithful in New Zealand.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External links and sourcesEdit