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Swimming at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metre breaststroke

The men's 100 metre breaststroke event at the 2016 Summer Olympics took place between 6–7 August at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium.[1]

Men's 100 metre breaststroke
at the Games of the XXXI Olympiad
Adam Peaty Olympics 100m breaststroke 2016.jpg
Peaty on his way to a gold-medal finish
VenueOlympic Aquatics Stadium
Dates6 August 2016 (heats &
semifinals)
7 August 2016 (final)
Competitors46 from 38 nations
Winning time57.13 WR
Medalists
1st, gold medalist(s) Adam Peaty  Great Britain
2nd, silver medalist(s) Cameron van der Burgh  South Africa
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Cody Miller  United States
← 2012
2020 →

Great Britain's Adam Peaty defeated the field with a new world record to become the country's third gold medalist in this event, since Duncan Goodhew topped the podium in 1980 and Adrian Moorhouse in 1988.[2][3] He jumped to an immediate lead, and never looked back, charging ahead of the field with his trademark high stroke rate to lower his own world record at 57.13. Peaty's time also gave him the largest margin of victory in the event's Olympic history, sparing 1.56 seconds over South Africa's defending champion Cameron van der Burgh, who won a silver in 58.69.[4] Meanwhile, U.S. swimmer Cody Miller overcame his rib condition to set a new American record of 58.87 for the bronze medal, edging out his teammate Kevin Cordes (59.22) to fourth by 0.35 of a second.[5][6]

Backed by a raucous home crowd, Brazil's João Gomes Júnior managed to pull off a fifth-place finish in 59.31, almost a tenth-second margin ahead of Japan's Yasuhiro Koseki (59.37) and his countryman Felipe França Silva (59.38). Swimming on the outside lane, Kazakhstan's Dmitriy Balandin rounded out the final with an eighth-place time in 59.85. For the first time in Olympic history, all eight finalists finished the race in less than a minute.[6]

Earlier in the prelims, Peaty established a new world-record time in 57.55 to lead all swimmers for the top seed, not only clipping 0.37 seconds off his own standard one year earlier, but also erasing van der Burgh's 2012 Olympic record by almost a second.[7]

Notable swimmers missed the final roster, including Australia's Jake Packard, Peaty's teammate and 2015 world bronze medalist Ross Murdoch, Lithuania's Giedrius Titenis, and Hungary's Dániel Gyurta, who elected not to do the swimoff with New Zealand's Glenn Snyders (a matching 1:00.26) on the morning prelims.[7]

The medals for the competition were presented by Sheikh Ahmed Al-Fahad Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah, Kuwait, IOC member, and the gifts were presented by Mr. Andrey Kryukov, Bureau Member of the FINA.

RecordsEdit

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World record   Adam Peaty (GBR) 57.92 London, United Kingdom 17 April 2015
Olympic record   Cameron van der Burgh (RSA) 58.46 London, United Kingdom 29 July 2012

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Time Record
6 August Heat 6 Adam Peaty   Great Britain 57.55 WR
7 August Final Adam Peaty   Great Britain 57.13 WR

ResultsEdit

HeatsEdit

[10][11]

Rank Heat Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 6 4 Adam Peaty   Great Britain 57.55 Q, WR
2 4 6 Yasuhiro Koseki   Japan 58.91 Q
3 5 3 Felipe França Silva   Brazil 59.01 Q, SA
4 4 4 Kevin Cordes   United States 59.13 Q
5 4 5 Cody Miller   United States 59.17 Q
6 6 6 Jake Packard   Australia 59.26 Q
7 5 4 Cameron van der Burgh   South Africa 59.35 Q
8 5 5 João Gomes Júnior   Brazil 59.46 Q
9 4 3 Dmitriy Balandin   Kazakhstan 59.47 Q
6 3 Ross Murdoch   Great Britain Q
11 6 1 Li Xiang   China 59.55 Q
12 6 5 Giedrius Titenis   Lithuania 59.90 Q
13 6 2 Vsevolod Zanko   Russia 59.91 Q
14 3 5 Jorge Murillo   Colombia 59.93 Q
15 4 2 Christian vom Lehn   Germany 1:00.13 Q
16 4 7 Glenn Snyders   New Zealand 1:00.26 WSO
4 8 Dániel Gyurta   Hungary LSO
18 5 1 Ippei Watanabe   Japan 1:00.33
19 6 8 Panagiotis Samilidis   Greece 1:00.35
20 5 6 Kirill Prigoda   Russia 1:00.37
21 5 7 Damir Dugonjič   Slovenia 1:00.41
22 5 8 Andrea Toniato   Italy 1:00.45
23 3 3 Andrius Šidlauskas   Lithuania 1:00.59
24 2 5 Yannick Käser   Switzerland 1:00.71
3 7 Jason Block   Canada
26 5 2 Čaba Silađi   Serbia 1:00.76
27 3 8 Laurent Carnol   Luxembourg 1:00.88
6 7 Yan Zibei   China
29 4 1 Marcin Stolarski   Poland 1:01.06
30 2 4 Carlos Claverie   Venezuela 1:01.13
3 4 Joshua Palmer   Australia
32 2 6 Erik Persson   Sweden 1:01.20
33 2 3 Nicholas Quinn   Ireland 1:01.29
34 3 1 Vladislav Mustafin   Uzbekistan 1:01.66
35 3 6 Anton Sveinn McKee   Iceland 1:01.84
36 2 2 Azad Al-Barazi   Syria 1:02.22
37 1 5 Radomyos Matjiur   Thailand 1:02.36
38 2 1 Matti Mattsson   Finland 1:02.45
39 1 4 Martin Melconian   Uruguay 1:02.67
40 1 3 Julian Fletcher   Bermuda 1:02.73
41 2 7 Édgar Crespo   Panama 1:02.78
42 3 2 Tomáš Klobučník   Slovakia 1:02.93
43 1 2 Benjamin Schulte   Guam 1:03.29
44 2 8 Dustin Tynes   Bahamas 1:03.71
45 1 6 Amini Fonua   Tonga 1:06.40
46 1 7 Corey Ollivierre   Grenada 1:08.68

Semi-finalsEdit

[12][13]

Semifinal 1Edit

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Yasuhiro Koseki   Japan 59.23 Q
2 5 Kevin Cordes   United States 59.33 Q
3 6 João Gomes Júnior   Brazil 59.40 Q
4 3 Jake Packard   Australia 59.48
5 7 Giedrius Titenis   Lithuania 59.80
6 2 Ross Murdoch   Great Britain 1:00.05
7 8 Glenn Snyders   New Zealand 1:00.50
8 1 Jorge Murillo   Colombia 1:00.81

Semifinal 2Edit

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
1 4 Adam Peaty   Great Britain 57.62 Q
2 3 Cody Miller   United States 59.05 Q
3 6 Cameron van der Burgh   South Africa 59.21 Q
4 5 Felipe França Silva   Brazil 59.35 Q
5 2 Dmitriy Balandin   Kazakhstan 59.45 Q
6 8 Christian vom Lehn   Germany 1:00.23
7 7 Li Xiang   China 1:00.25
8 1 Vsevolod Zanko   Russia 1:00.39

FinalEdit

[14]

Rank Lane Name Nationality Time Notes
  4 Adam Peaty   Great Britain 57.13 WR
  3 Cameron van der Burgh   South Africa 58.69
  5 Cody Miller   United States 58.87 AM
4 2 Kevin Cordes   United States 59.22
5 1 João Gomes Júnior   Brazil 59.31
6 6 Yasuhiro Koseki   Japan 59.37
7 7 Felipe França Silva   Brazil 59.38
8 8 Dmitriy Balandin   Kazakhstan 59.85

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Men's 100m Breaststroke". Rio 2016. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  2. ^ "Adam Peaty wins first Olympic gold and smashes world record again". The Guardian. 8 August 2016. Retrieved 8 August 2016.
  3. ^ "Rio Olympics 2016: Adam Peaty wins GB's first medal with swimming gold". BBC Sport. 7 August 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  4. ^ "Van der Burgh takes silver in Rio". News24. 8 August 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Cody Miller Overcomes Rib Condition To Win Bronze For U.S. Swim Team". The Huffington Post. 8 August 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Adam Peaty Lowers 100 Breaststroke World Record on Way to Gold". Swimming World Magazine. 7 August 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Adam Peaty Scorches 100 Breast Prelims With New World Record At 2016 Rio Olympic Games". Swimming World Magazine. 7 August 2016. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  8. ^ "Britain's Adam Peaty breaks 100m breaststroke world record". The Guardian. 17 April 2015. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  9. ^ "2012 London Olympics: Cameron van der Burgh's World Record Ends Kosuke Kitajima's Threepeat Bid in 100 Breast; Hansen Medals". Swimming World Magazine. 29 July 2012. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  10. ^ "SWM031900_StartList_2016_08_04.pdf:" (PDF). Rio 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 August 2016. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  11. ^ "SWM031900_ResultsSummary_2016_08_06.pdf:" (PDF). Rio 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 August 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  12. ^ "SWM031200_StartList_2016_08_06.pdf:" (PDF). Rio 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 August 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  13. ^ "SWM031200_ResultsSummary_2016_08_06.pdf:" (PDF). Rio 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 August 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  14. ^ "SWM031101_Results_2016_08_07.pdf:" (PDF). Rio 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 August 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2016.