Open main menu

Swedish Work Environment Authority

The Swedish Work Environment Authority (SWEA) (Swedish: Arbetsmiljöverket, abbreviated AV) is a Swedish administrative authority sorting under the Ministry of Employment, responsible for issues relating to the working environment and work injury statistics. The agency is tasked by the Government with issuing regulations, should spread information and furnish advice on occupational safety and health (OSH), and the relating labour laws, in particular the Work Environment Act (AML). This is primarily done with the Work Environment Authority's Statute Book (AFS), which contains provisions and general recommendations specifying the requirements to be met by the work environment. The agency also publishes other books, brochures, reports and should promote collaboration between parties on the labour market, on issues relating to OSH. Furthermore, the agency has a supervisory role for the compliance of the occupational health legislation, the Working Hours Act (SFS 1982:673) and, in certain aspects, the Tobacco Act (SFS 1993:581) and the Environmental Code (SFS 1998:808). This is usually done with inspections, and for this purpose, the agency has the right to issue stipulations and injunctions to any non-compliant employer.[2][3]

Swedish Work Environment Authority
Arbetsmiljöverket (AV)
Arbetsmiljöverket vapen.svg
The coat of arms of the Swedish Work Environment Authority
Agency overview
Formed2001
Preceding agencies
  • Regional Labour Inspectorate districts,
  • The National Board of Occupational Safety and Health
JurisdictionGovernment of Sweden
HeadquartersLindhagensgatan 133
Stockholm
Employees555 (2013)[1]
Annual budgetSEK 505M (2013)
Minister responsible
Agency executive
Parent agencyMinistry of Employment
Key document
Websiteav.se

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Årsredovisning 2013" (PDF) (in Swedish). AV. Retrieved 12 August 2014.
  2. ^ "About us". AV.
  3. ^ "Förordning (2007:913) med instruktion för Arbetsmiljöverket" (in Swedish). The Riksdag. Retrieved 12 August 2014.

External linksEdit