Susan Fales-Hill

Susan Fales-Hill (born August 15, 1962) is an American television producer, author, screenwriter and an advocate for the arts and education.[2]

Susan Fales-Hill
Susan Fales-Hill on Misty Copeland.jpg
Fales-Hill in 2015 video
Born
Susan Marya Fales

(1962-08-15) August 15, 1962 (age 60)
Rome, Italy
NationalityHaitian-American
Occupation(s)Television producer, author, screenwriter
Years active1984-present
Notable workOne Flight Up (novel),
Imperfect Bliss (novel),
Always Wear Joy (memoir)
SpouseAaron Hill (m. 1997)[1]
Parent(s)Timothy Fales
Josephine Premice
WebsiteOfficial website

BiographyEdit

Fales-Hill is the daughter of Haitian-American actress Josephine Premice, who was well known for her work on the Broadway stage, and Timothy Fales, an American stockbroker, whose ancestors were pilgrims arriving on the Mayflower from England in 1620.[3] She attended the Lycée Français de New York and graduated from Harvard University with a degree in literature and history.[4]

Fales-Hill was a writer for The Cosby Show and the lead writer and producer for A Different World.[3]

Fales-Hill married Aaron Hill, a New York banker, in 1997.[1] Their daughter Bristol was born in 2003.[5]

In addition to her native English, Fales-Hill is able to speak French, Italian, Spanish, and speaks some Haitian Creole.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Press, ed. (1 June 1997). "Susan Fales And Aaron Hill". New York Times. Retrieved 22 November 2015.
  2. ^ Foster-Frau, Silvia, ed. (19 November 2015). "Latest needs assessment to be announced at luncheon". Greenwich Time. Retrieved 22 November 2015.
  3. ^ a b Siegel, Micki, ed. (24 October 2012). "Storybook Park Avenue". New York Post. Retrieved 22 November 2015.
  4. ^ Horyn, Cathy, ed. (27 April 2003). "Can a Smile Bridge The Divide?". New York Times. Retrieved 22 November 2015.
  5. ^ Susan Fales-Hill biography, WOMEN IN ENTERPRISING FAMILIES INITIATIVE
  6. ^ Brown, Ann, ed. (September 2000). "Personal Passions: Learning Lingos - TV Executive Studies Languages for Fun". Black Enterprise Sep. 2000. p. 209. Retrieved 22 November 2015.

External linksEdit