Stits SA-7 Sky-Coupe

The Stits SA-7 Skycoupe is a two-seat, side-by-side seating, high wing homebuilt aircraft designed by Ray Stits.[2]

Stits SA-7 Skycoupe
Empire State Aerosciences Museum - Glenville, New York (8158375346).jpg
Role Homebuilt aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Stits Aircraft
Designer Ray Stits, Harold Dale
First flight 1957
Introduction 1957
Unit cost
approximately $2700 to build in 1971[1]

DesignEdit

Ray Stits designed 14 different homebuilt aircraft kits that were some of the first available to the general public built in quantity.[3] Stits is also known to the general public as the maker of the Stits Junior, Stits SA-2A Sky Baby,[4] and Stits Baby Bird, each of which was once the world's smallest aircraft.[5] Engineer Harold Dale assisted in the certification process after completing his Dale Weejet 800.[6]

The Skycoupe was provided as a kit with a pre-fabricated steel tube fuselage. The surfaces are fabric covered. The aircraft was designed to accommodate engines ranging from 60 to 90 hp (45 to 67 kW).

VariantsEdit

SA-7A
SA-7B
Powered by a Continental C85
SA-7C
SA-7D
Updated with a squared off swept tail configuration.
SA-9A
A type certificated version.

Specifications Stits SA-7B Sky-CoupeEdit

Data from Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1961–62[7]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 2
  • Length: 17 ft 9 in (5.41 m)
  • Wingspan: 25 ft 9 in (7.85 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
  • Wing area: 120 sq ft (11 m2)
  • Aspect ratio: 5:1
  • Airfoil: NACA 4412
  • Empty weight: 650 lb (295 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,175 lb (533 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 18 US gal (15 imp gal; 68 L)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Continental C85 air-cooled flat-four, 85 hp (63 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 120 kn (138 mph, 222 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 100 kn (120 mph, 190 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 42 kn (48 mph, 77 km/h)
  • Range: 350 nmi (400 mi, 640 km)
  • Service ceiling: 12,000 ft (3,700 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,000 ft/min (5.1 m/s)

See alsoEdit

Related development

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Leo J. Kohn (Winter 1971). "The true cost of building your own plane". Air Trails: 63.
  2. ^ Leo J. Kohn (Feb 1957). "The Latest in the Stits Line". experimenter.
  3. ^ "Students Restore Sky Coupe". Archived from the original on 22 November 2010. Retrieved 27 December 2010.
  4. ^ Hearst Magazines (September 1952). "Seven Foot Airplane Flies 150 Miles Per Hour". Popular Mechanics. Hearst Magazines. p. 117.
  5. ^ "Ray Stits". Retrieved 27 December 2010.
  6. ^ Trefethen, Joan (May 1959). "The 'Weejet'". Sport Aviation: 4–5.
  7. ^ Taylor 1961, p. 326
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1961). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1961–62. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company, Ltd.