Open main menu

Solomon Islands at the 1996 Summer Olympics

The Solomon Islands sent a delegation to compete at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, United States from 19 July to 4 August 1996. This was the nation's fourth appearance at a Summer Olympic Games. The delegation to Atlanta consisted of four athletes, three in track and field: Selwyn Kole, Primo Higa, and Nester Geniwala'a; and one in weightlifting: Tony Analau. None of the athletes made their event final.

Solomon Islands at the
1996 Summer Olympics
Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg
IOC codeSOL
NOCNational Olympic Committee of Solomon Islands
Websitewww.oceaniasport.com/solomon
in Atlanta
Competitors4
Medals
Gold
0
Silver
0
Bronze
0
Total
0
Summer Olympics appearances (overview)

BackgroundEdit

The National Olympic Committee of Solomon Islands was recognized by the International Olympic Committee on 31 December 1982.[1] Having participated in the 1984, 1988, and 1992 Summer Olympics, the Atlanta Olympics were their fourth appearance in Olympic competition.[2] The 1996 Summer Olympics were held from 19 July to 4 August 1996; 10,318 athletes represented 194 National Olympic Committees.[3] The Solomon Islands' delegation to Atlanta consisted of four athletes, three in track and field: Selwyn Kole, Primo Higa, and Nester Geniwala'a; and one in weightlifting: Tony Analau.[4]

AthleticsEdit

Selwyn Kole was 22 years old at the time of the Atlanta Olympics, and was making his Olympic debut.[5] In the first round of the men's 1500 meters, held on 29 July, he was drawn into heat five.[6] He finished in a time of 4 minutes and 3.44 seconds, 12th and last in his heat, and insufficient to advance to the next round.[7] Primo Higa was 23 years old at the time.[8] On 29 July, in the first round of the men's 3000 meters steeplechase he failed to finish the race and was eliminated from the competition.[9][10] Higa would return four years later to represent the Solomon Islands at the 2000 Summer Olympics.[8] Nester Geniwala'a was 19 years of age at the time, and making her Olympic debut.[11] In the first round of the women's 100 meters on 26 July, she was drawn into heat six. She finished the heat in 13.74 seconds, eighth in her heat.[12] Only the top four from each heat plus to next four overall fastest could advance, and she was eliminated.[13]

Key
  • Note–Ranks given for track events are within the athlete's heat only
  • N/A = Round not applicable for the event

Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank
Selwyn Kole Men's 1500 m 4:03.44 12 N/A Did not advance
Primo Higa Men's 3000 m steeplechase Did not finish N/A Did not advance
Nester Geniwala'a Women's 100 m 13.74 8 Did not advance

WeightliftingEdit

Tony Analau was 27 years old at the time of the Atlanta Olympics, and was making his Olympic debut.[14] He competed in the men's under 64 kilograms category on 22 July. In the snatch he failed all three attempts to lift 80 kilograms, and was eliminated from the competition.[15][16]

Key
  • Note– Struck through values indicate a competitor failed to achieve a valid lift at that weight.

Athlete Event Snatch Clean & Jerk Total Rank
Result Rank Result Rank
Tony Analau Men's − 64 kg 80 Did not finish

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Solomon Islands – National Olympic Committee (NOC)". International Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 13 June 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Solomon Islands". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 13 June 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  3. ^ "1996 Olympics – Summer Olympic Games – Atlanta 1996". International Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 27 June 2018. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Solomon Islands at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 4 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  5. ^ "Selwyn Kole Bio, Stats, and Results". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 3 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  6. ^ "The Official Report of the Centennial Olympic Games; Volume 3" (PDF). The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. p. 76. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  7. ^ "Athletics at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games: Men's 1,500 metres Round One". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 30 June 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Primo Higa Bio, Stats, and Results". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 3 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  9. ^ "The Official Report of the Centennial Olympic Games; Volume 3" (PDF). The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. p. 85. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  10. ^ "Athletics at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games: Men's 3,000 metres Steeplechase Round One". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  11. ^ "Nester Geniwala'a Bio, Stats, and Results". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 4 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  12. ^ "The Official Report of the Centennial Olympic Games; Volume 3" (PDF). The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. p. 69. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  13. ^ "Athletics at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games: Women's 100 metres Round One". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 5 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  14. ^ "Tony Analau Bio, Stats, and Results". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 4 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  15. ^ "Weightlifting at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games: Men's Featherweight Snatch". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 7 July 2017. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  16. ^ "Atlanta 1996 Weightlifting 59–64 kg (featherweight) men". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 4 September 2018.