Solar eclipse of April 29, 1995

An annular solar eclipse occurred on April 29, 1995. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. Annularity was visible in Peru, southeastern Ecuador, southeastern Colombia and Brazil.

Solar eclipse of April 29, 1995
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureAnnular
Gamma−0.3382
Magnitude0.9497
Maximum eclipse
Duration397 s (6 min 37 s)
Coordinates4°48′S 79°24′W / 4.8°S 79.4°W / -4.8; -79.4
Max. width of band196 km (122 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse17:33:20
References
Saros138 (30 of 70)
Catalog # (SE5000)9497

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7]

Images edit

 

Observations edit

A team of NASA's Johnson Space Center observed the annular eclipse near Puinahua District in the Peruvian Amazon rainforest. The weather was clear and the observations were successful.[8]

Related eclipses edit

Eclipses of 1995 edit

Solar eclipses 1993–1996 edit

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[9]

Solar eclipse series sets from 1993 to 1996
Descending node   Ascending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
118 1993 May 21
 
Partial
1.13720 123 1993 November 13
 
Partial
−1.04114
128
 
Partial from Bismarck, ND
1994 May 10
 
Annular
0.40771 133
 
Totality at Bolivia
1994 November 3
 
Total
−0.35216
138 1995 April 29
 
Annular
−0.33821 143
 
Totality at Dundlod, India
1995 October 24
 
Total
0.35176
148 1996 April 17
 
Partial
−1.05796 153 1996 October 12
 
Partial
1.12265

Saros 138 edit

It is a part of Saros cycle 138, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, containing 70 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on June 6, 1472. It contains annular eclipses from August 31, 1598, through February 18, 2482 with a hybrid eclipse on March 1, 2500. It has total eclipses from March 12, 2518, through April 3, 2554. The series ends at member 70 as a partial eclipse on July 11, 2716. The longest duration of totality will be only 56 seconds on April 3, 2554.

Metonic series edit

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.

21 eclipse events, progressing from north to south between July 11, 1953 and July 11, 2029
July 10–12 April 29–30 February 15–16 December 4–5 September 21–23
116 118 120 122 124
 
July 11, 1953
 
April 30, 1957
 
February 15, 1961
 
December 4, 1964
 
September 22, 1968
126 128 130 132 134
 
July 10, 1972
 
April 29, 1976
 
February 16, 1980
 
December 4, 1983
 
September 23, 1987
136 138 140 142 144
 
July 11, 1991
 
April 29, 1995
 
February 16, 1999
 
December 4, 2002
 
September 22, 2006
146 148 150 152 154
 
July 11, 2010
 
April 29, 2014
 
February 15, 2018
 
December 4, 2021
 
September 21, 2025
156 158 160 162 164
 
July 11, 2029

References edit

  1. ^ "Hoy, eclipse solar parcial". La Prensa. Panama City, Panama, Panama. 1995-04-29. p. 44. Retrieved 2023-10-18 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Eclipse anular de sol causa entusiasmo y advertencias en Perú". El Nuevo Herald. Miami, Florida. 1995-04-29. p. 21. Retrieved 2023-10-18 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "AstroData". The Morning Call. Allentown, Pennsylvania. 1995-04-29. p. 86. Retrieved 2023-10-18 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "UNH has another alternative paper". The Boston Globe. Boston, Massachusetts. 1995-04-30. p. 303. Retrieved 2023-10-18 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Partial eclipse is seen at Deltona observatory". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando, Florida. 1995-04-30. p. 283. Retrieved 2023-10-18 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Annular eclipse in the limelight". Detroit Free Press. Detroit, Michigan. 1995-04-30. p. 5. Retrieved 2023-10-18 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Peruvians see unusual eclipse". The Boston Globe. Boston, Massachusetts. 1995-04-30. p. 17. Retrieved 2023-10-18 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ Paul D. Maley. "Ring Eclipse in the Amazon Rainforest". Eclipse Tours. Archived from the original on 18 September 2020.
  9. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

External links edit

Photos: