Severo Colberg Toro

Severo Colberg Toro (born in November 6, 1953 in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico) is a Puerto Rican politician and attorney. He served as a member of the Puerto Rico House of Representatives from 1993 to 2004. He is affiliated to the Popular Democratic Party (PPD).

Severo Colberg Toro
At-Large Member of the Puerto Rico House of Representatives
In office
1993–2004
Personal details
Born (1953-11-06) November 6, 1953 (age 67)
Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico
Political partyPopular Democratic Party (PPD)
Alma materUniversity of Puerto Rico

Early years and studiesEdit

Severo Colberg Toro was born on November 7, 1953 in Cabo Rojo. His parents are Severo Colberg Ramírez, a former President of the House of Representatives, and Eva Toro Franquiz, a college professor and former Student Dean at the University of Puerto Rico. His younger brother, Jorge, was also elected a member of the House of Representatives from 2003 to 2012.

Colberg Toro completed his bachelor's degree and law degree from the University of Puerto Rico School of Law in 1980. He worked as a legal counsel to the House of Representatives from 1981 to 1990 and was Executive Director of the House of Representatives Committee Against Government Corruption . He was also a member of the Board of the Puerto Rico Bar Association, and presided the presidential campaign of Rev. Jesse Jackson in Puerto Rico in 1988.

Political career: 1992-2004Edit

Colberg was first elected to the Puerto Rico House of Representatives in 1992. He was appointed Minority Whip and Minority Speaker in 1995. Colberg was reelected in 1996 and 2000.[1]

In 2003, Colberg decided to run for the Senate of Puerto Rico, and gained a spot in the ballot at the PPD primaries.[2] However, at the 2004 general elections, he lost.[3]

ReferencesEdit

House of Representatives of Puerto Rico
Preceded by
Rolando Ortiz Velázquez
Minority Whip of the Puerto Rico House of Representatives
1994–1995
Succeeded by
Ferdinand Lugo González
Preceded by
José Enrique Arrarás
Minority Leader of the Puerto Rico House of Representatives
1995–1997
Succeeded by
Aníbal Acevedo Vilá

External linksEdit