San Diego, I Love You

San Diego, I Love You is a 1944 American comedy film directed by Reginald Le Borg and starring Jon Hall, Louise Allbritton and Edward Everett Horton.[1]

San Diego, I Love You
Directed byReginald Le Borg
Produced byMichael Fessier
Ernest Pagano
Written byRichard Bransten
Michael Fessier
Ruth McKenney
Ernest Pagano
StarringJon Hall
Louise Allbritton
Edward Everett Horton
Music byHans J. Salter
CinematographyHal Mohr
Edited byCharles Maynard
Production
company
Distributed byUniversal Pictures
Release date
September 29, 1944
Running time
83 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

SynopsisEdit

Philip McCooley, a widowed high school teacher in small-town California, believes that he has discovered a new self-inflating life raft. He is persuaded by his elder daughter Virginia to travel to San Diego to apply for funds from a developmental agency, and takes his four young sons along as well. On the train journey they encounter and offend John Thompson Caldwell IV by taking his compartment, little realizing that he is extremely wealthy and the head of the agency that the McCooley's need the support of. With their last savings, the family buy a house in the city, which comes with an unusual butler and a very confused lodger.

After Caldwell dismisses McCooley's invention, his daughter forces herself into his company to convince him otherwise. Although at first he resists her approaches, they gradually fall in love as they both come to appreciate the attractions of San Diego. Caldwell is persuaded to give the invention a second look. While McCooley's life raft ultimately proves to be both useless and dangerous, he has unwittingly invented a very destructive explosive which can be used by the War Department.

Buster Keaton appears in an extended cameo role as a bus driver who is persuaded by the heroine to abandon his usual route and drive along the beach.

CastEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ McLaughlin p.249

BibliographyEdit

  • Robert McLaughlin. We'll Always Have the Movies: American Cinema during World War II. University Press of Kentucky, 2006.

External linksEdit