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SABC 1 is a community public service South African television channel broadcast by the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) which carries programming in English and Nguni.

SABC 1
New logo - SABC 1.png
Launched1 January 1982 (as TV2/3)
March 1985 (TV4)
January 1992 (TV2/3/4 merged into CCV)
4 February 1996 (as SABC 1)
NetworkSABC
Owned bySouth African Broadcasting Corporation
Picture format16:9 (576i, SDTV)
SloganMzansi fo sho
CountrySouth Africa
LanguageEnglish and Nguni[1]
Broadcast areaSouth Africa
HeadquartersSABC Television Park, Uitsaaisentrum, Johannesburg, South Africa
Formerly calledCCV TV
ReplacedTV 2/3/4
Sister channel(s)SABC 2
SABC 3
SABC News
SABC Encore
Websitewww.sabc1.co.za
Availability
Terrestrial
SentechChannel depends on nearest Sentech repeater
Satellite
StarSatChannel 157
OVHDChannel 101
DSTVChannel 191

It was created in 1996, after the SABC restructured its television channels. SABC 1 carried much of its programming over from the defunct CCV (Contemporary Community Values) channel, which was itself made up of the old TV2, TV3 and TV4 channels created in the 1980s. SABC 1 generates the widest audience in South Africa due to its programming diversity, airing SABC's longest running soap-opera, Generations, Uzalo and Skeem Saam .

Contents

HistoryEdit

On 1 January 1982, two services were introduced, TV2 broadcasting in Zulu and Xhosa and TV3 broadcasting in Sotho and Tswana, both targeted at a Black urban audience.[2] The main channel, now called TV1, was divided evenly between English and Afrikaans, as before. In 1985, a new service called TV4 was introduced, carrying sports and entertainment programming, using the channel shared by TV2 and TV3, which stopped broadcasting at 9:30pm.[3]

In 1992, TV2, TV3 and TV4 were combined into a new service called CCV (Contemporary Community Values).[4] A third channel was introduced known as TSS, or TopSport Surplus, TopSport being the brand name for the SABC's sport coverage, but this was replaced by NNTV (National Network TV), an educational, non-commercial channel, in 1994.[5] In 1996, the SABC reorganised it's three TV channels with the aim of making them more representative of the various language groups. These new channels were called SABC 1, SABC 2 and SABC 3.


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Media Development and Diversity Agency - a draft position paper". South African Government Information. November 2000. p. 68. Archived from the original on 2009-08-31. Retrieved 2008-11-30.
  2. ^ The Press and Apartheid: Repression and Propaganda in South Africa, William A. Hachten, C.Anthony Giffard Springer, 1984, page 222
  3. ^ Communication and Democratic Reform in South Africa, Robert B. Horwitz, Cambridge University Press, 2001, page 68
  4. ^ South Africa: Official Yearbook of the Republic of South Africa, Department of Information, 1992, page 131
  5. ^ The voice, the vision: a sixty year history of the South African Broadcasting Corporation, Malcolm Theunissen, Victor Nikitin, Melanie Pillay, Advent Graphics, 1996, page 127

External linksEdit