Russian State University of Physical Education, Sport, Youth and Tourism

Russian State University of Physical Education, Sport, Youth and Tourism (SCOLIPE) (Russian: Российский государственный университет физической культуры, спорта, молодёжи и туризма (ГЦОЛИФК)) is a university in Moscow, founded in 1918.[1][2]

Russian State University of Physical Education, Sport, Youth and Tourism (SCOLIPE)
Российский государственный университет физической культуры, спорта, молодёжи и туризма (ГЦОЛИФК)
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Established1918
RectorProfessor Tamara Viсtorovna Mikhaylova
Location
55°48′06″N 37°45′46″E / 55.8016°N 37.7627°E / 55.8016; 37.7627Coordinates: 55°48′06″N 37°45′46″E / 55.8016°N 37.7627°E / 55.8016; 37.7627
Websitewww.sportedu.ru/en

NamesEdit

  • 1918 – Moscow State University of Physical Education
  • 1920 – State Central Institute of Physical Education (SCIPE)
  • 1934 – State Central Order of Lenin Institute of Physical Education (SCOLIPE)
  • 1937 – State Central Order of Lenin Institute of Physical Education "Marshal Joseph Stalin"
  • 1961 – State Central Order of Lenin Institute of Physical Education (SCOLIPE)
  • 1993 – Russian State Academy of Physical Education (RSAPE)
  • 2001 – Russian State University of Physical Education, Sport, Youth and Tourism (RSUPESY&T)

Notable alumniEdit

Many graduates are European, World, Olympic and Paralympic champions:

ConcentrationEdit

OtherEdit

Notable facultyEdit

  • David Tyshler (1927–2014), Ukrainian/Soviet Olympic bronze medalist fencer

Selected departments and specializationsEdit

ChessEdit

Grigory Goldberg (ru) (1908–1976), in 1966, was the founding head of the postbaccalaureate program in chess which initially was organized as an academic specialization of the institution. In 1974, the specialization program was upgraded to the Chess Department that offered a Master of Sport in Chess. The chess program is chronicled as the first in the history of higher education.[3]

The Master of Sports in Chess should not be confused with the title and rank, Master of Sports of the USSR in Chess (ru), which was established for men in 1934 and for women in 1950.[1] From 1934 through 1987, the USSR conferred 1,061 Master of Sport in Chess titles – 904 to men and 157 to women. The Master of Sport of the USSR was a nationally distinguished rank and title for many major sports of the former Soviet Union.[3][4]

Heads of the chess program
Years Name
1966–1975 Grigory Abramovich Goldberg (Russian: Григорий Абрамович Гольдберг) (ru) (1908–1976).
1977–1982 GM Yakov Estrin (1923–1987).
1982–1983 GM Nikolai Krogius (Russian: Николай Владимирович Крогиус) (born 1930) earned a PhD in psychology in 1969 from Leningrad State University and established himself as a scholar in cognition during conflicts. Krogius is recognized as a pioneer in research on the psychology of the chess game. He has published about 20 of his books and 150 articles on the topic. In Russian psychology, Krogius's notable works include "Personality in Conflict" and Psychology of Chess Creativity.[5] In 1998, Krogius emigrated with his family to the United States.
1990–2010 Evgeny Pavlovich Linovitsky (Russian: Евгений Павлович Линовицкий) (born 1935), a rocket engineer, military pilot, and former Major General in the Soviet Strategic Missile Forces. He was a 1968 graduate of the Military Engineering Academy named after F. Dzerzhinsky. He was a recipient of the Soviet Order of the Red Banner of Labor for unique combat training missile launches.

Notes and referencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Riordan, James, 1977, p. 77.
  2. ^ Linovitsky, Evgeny Pavlovich, Russian State University, Moscow, 75th Anniversary Yearbook, 1993, pp. 309–316.
  3. ^ a b Dvoretsky, Mark, 2012, pp. 51.
  4. ^ Soltis, Andrew, 1981, pp. 49–50.
  5. ^ Krogius, Nikolay Vladimirovich 1981.

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit