Roxanna Carrillo

Roxanna Carrillo is a Peruvian activist and feminist. Carrillo has worked for the United Nations for around twenty years. She was involved in the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) where she studied gender based violence and its effect on women around the world.

BiographyEdit

Carrillo studied literature and linguistics at the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.[1] Carrillo earned her masters degree in political science from Rutgers University.[2] Carrillo began a relationship with Charlotte Bunch that was both professional and personal in 1983.[3] The two worked on feminist projects in Latin America and have been together for more than thirty years.[3]

WorkEdit

Carrillo is one of the founders of the Flora Tristán Peruvian Women's Center, a feminist organization.[2] The center is one of the first non-governmental organizations for women created in Peru.[4]

Carrillo was responsible for bringing the issue of violence against women to international prominence at the United Nations (UN) in the early 1990s.[5] In 1991, she wrote a research paper for the Human Rights Commission on this topic and how violence affected women's lives.[5] Later, Carrillo was hired by the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) as a consultant on violence against women.[6] Carrillo's research at UNIFEM found that worldwide, a lack of economic opportunity was at the root of many different forms of violence against women.[6] This research (Battered Dreams: Violence Against Women as an Obstacle to Development), in addition to work done by Charlotte Bunch, was the basis of "mandating a broader focus for UNIFEM in the early 1990s."[6][4] In 1993, she was part of the group that put "women's rights as human rights" on the agenda for the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna.[4] Carrillo worked for the United Nations for around twenty years.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Chesler, Ellen; McGovern, Terry (2016). Women and Girls Rising: Progress and resistance around the world. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-317-48265-9. Archived from the original on 27 September 2020. Retrieved 30 June 2020.
  2. ^ a b Stromquist, Nelly P. (1998). Women in the Third World: An Encyclopedia of Contemporary Issues. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-135-49861-0. Archived from the original on 27 September 2020. Retrieved 30 June 2020.
  3. ^ a b Garrido, Anahi Russo (2015). "Interview with Charlotte Bunch: Human Rights and Gender Equality". In Brooks, Adrian (ed.). The Right Side of History: 100 Years of LGBTQI Activism. New York: Cleis Press. pp. 138, 142. ISBN 978-1-62778-123-7. Archived from the original on 27 September 2020. Retrieved 30 June 2020.
  4. ^ a b c "About the Presenters and Commentators". America Latina en Moviemiento. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  5. ^ a b Coward, Ros (1 August 1997). "Sign of the Crimes Against Women". The Mail & Guardian. Archived from the original on 27 September 2020. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  6. ^ a b c Hudson, Natalie Florea (2010). Gender, Human Security and the United Nations: Security Language as a Political Framework for Women. London: Routledge. p. 99. ISBN 978-1-135-19693-6. Archived from the original on 27 September 2020. Retrieved 30 June 2020.

External linksEdit