Roman Catholic Diocese of Teramo-Atri

The Diocese of Teramo-Atri (Latin: Dioecesis Aprutina seu Teramensis-Hatriensis seu Atriensis) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Abruzzo, central Italy. The current extent of the diocese was established in 1949, when the historic Diocese of Teramo was combined with the Diocese of Penne-Atri, in the Abruzzo. It is suffragan of the Archdiocese of Pescara-Penne.[1][2]

Diocese of Teramo-Atri

Dioecesis Aprutina seu Teramensis-Hatriensis seu Atriensis
Duomo di Teramo - facciata principale.jpg
Teramo Cathedral
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provincePescara-Penne
Statistics
Area1,480 km2 (570 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2017)
223,950 (est.)
223,481 (guess) (99.8%)
Parishes187
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established5th century
CathedralBasilica Cattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Teramo)
Co-cathedralBasilica Concattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Atri)
Secular priests106 (diocesan)
62 (Religious Orders)
12 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopLorenzo Leuzzi
Bishops emeritusMichele Seccia
Map
Mapof diocese of Teramo-Atri
Website
www.diocesiteramoatri.it

HistoryEdit

After the invasion of Italy by the Lombards, Teramo became the residence of a gastald, depending on the Duke of Spoleto; under the Franks it was annexed by the Normans. In 1155 Count Robert II of Loritello rebelled against King Roger II of Sicily[3] and destroyed the city, soon rebuilt through the efforts of Bishop Guido (1122), for which he and his successors were granted the investiture of the principality.[4] In 1215 the privilege was granted to the bishops of Teramo by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor of celebrating their first solemn Mass armed and having arms also on the altar. Pope Clement VII dispensed Bishop Francesco Cherigatto from observing the custom in a brief of 15 January 1524; the practice was finally abolished in 1554.[5] Hardly had the town risen again when it began a series of quarrels with Ascoli, which more than once threatened to become sanguinary. Teramo resisted till the end of 1270 during the Angevin invasion.[6] A little later the bishops abandoned their temporal sovereignty and a royal captain was installed.

In the beginning of the 15th century the Melatino, di Janni, and Acquaviva began to struggle for possession of the town. In 1416 it was sacked by Lordino de Saligny, a Frenchman,[7] exasperated at being deprived of the title of High Constable of the kingdom of Naples. During the pillage the treasures of the cathedral disappeared.[8]

A census book of the bishops of Teramo, which was revised under Bishop Francesco Cherigatto (1522–1539), provides extensive information on the organization of the diocese, and on its churches, chapels, and property.[9]

In 1818 the diocese of Campli was incorporated into the See of Teramo.[10]

In 1949 the diocese of Teramo was affected by changes brought about by movements of population as well as the new political structure of the Abruzzi brought about by the Fascists, the end of the Kingdom of Italy, and the creation of the Italian Republic. As the capital of a province, Pescara deserved to become the seat of a bishop; but the city extended over two different dioceses, Chieti and Penne.[11] Pope Pius XII therefore decided on the rearrangement of the diocesan system, which he effected in the Bull Dioecesium subscriptiones of 1 July 1949.[12]

The seat of the diocese of Penne e Atri was transferred from Penne to the city of Pescara, and its name changed to Pinnensis-Piscarensis. The cathedral in Penne was named a co-cathedral. The diocesan seminary was transferred to Pescara. These decisions left status of the diocese of Atri in question. Since the diocese of Atri was entirely in the civil province of Teramo, Atri was united aequaliter principaliter with the diocese of Teramo, forming the diocese of Teramo e Atri.[13]

In 1986, the name of the diocese of Teramo e Atri (Aprutina et Hatriensis) was changed to Teramo-Atri. This meant a major change in the organization of the dioceses. A decree approved by Pope John Paul II in an audience of 27 September 1986, and published by the Congregation of Bishops on 30 September, cancelled the union of the two dioceses under one bishop aequaliter principaliter. Atri was subsumed into the diocese of Teramo. The former cathedral of Atri was allowed to call itself a co-cathedral, and its Chapter was named the Chapter of the Co-cathedral; but there was only one diocesan cathedral at Teramo, and its Chapter was the one diocesan Chapter. There was to be one episcopal curia, one ecclesiastical tribunal, one college of Consultors, one Council of Priests, and one seminary, all of which were at Teramo or a place designated by the bishop. Priests and deacons were to be incardinated in the new Diocese of Teramo-Atri.[14]

The diocese currently (2019) has five seminarians.[15]

BishopsEdit

Diocese of TeramoEdit

to 1450Edit

...
Sede vacante (598)[16]
  • Opportunus (attested 601)[17]
...
  • Sigismundus (attested 844)[18]
...
  • Joannes (attested 879)[19]
...
  • Landulfus (attested 948, 963)[20]
...
  • Petrus (attested 976, 1036)[21]
...
  • Bertoldus (attested 1075)[22]
...
  • Ugo (attested 1086)[23]
...
  • Sanso (attested 1041)[24]
...
  • Petrus (attested 1056–1065)[25]
...
  • Guido (attested 1100/1101)[26]
  • Ubertus (attested 1103, 1105, 1108, 1114)[27]
  • Berardus (1116–1122)[28]
...
  • Guido (attested 1153)[29]
  • Dionysius (1170–1174)[30]
  • Atto (attested 1203)[31]
  • Saxo (1205–1220)[32]
  • Atto (1221– c. 1230/1232)[33]
  • Silvester (by 1232–1235)[34]
  • Atto[35]
  • Matthaeus de Bellanto[36]
  • Gentilis de Sulmona (1267–1272)[37]
  • Rainaldus de Barili (1272–1282)[38]
  • Rogerius (1282–1294)[39]
Sede vacante (1294–1295)
  • Franciscus (1295–1300)[40]
  • Rainaldus de Aquaviva (1301–1314)[41]
Sede vacante (1314–1317)
  • Nicolaus Arcioni (1317–1355)[42]
  • Stephanus de Teramo (1355–1363)[43]
  • Pietro de Valle (1363–1396)[44]
  • Conradus de Melatino (1396–1405)[45]
  • Antonio de Melatino (1405–1407) Administrator[46]
  • Marinus de Tocco (1407–1411)[47]
  • Stephanus de Carraria (1412–1427)[48]
  • Benedictus Guidalotti (1427–1429)[49]
  • Jacobus de Seranthonio (1429–1443)[50]
  • Francesco Monaldeschi (1443–1450)[51]

1450 to 1700Edit

1700 to 1950Edit

  • Giuseppe Riganti (1719–1720)[70]
  • Francesco Maria Tansi (1721–1723 Died)[71]
  • Pietro Agostino Scorza (Scortia) (1724–1731)[72]
  • Tommaso Alessio de’ Rossi (1731–1749)[73]
  • Panfilo Antonio Mazzara (1749–1766)[74]
  • Ignazio Andrea Sambiase, C.R. (1767–1776)[75]
  • Luigi Maria Pirelli, C.R. (1777–1804) [76]
  • Francesco Antonio Nanni, C.M. (1805–1822)[77]
  • Giuseppe Maria Pezzella, O.E.S.A. (1823–1828)[78]
  • Alessandro Berettini (1830–1849)[79]
  • Pasquale Taccone (30 Sep 1850 Confirmed – 20 Oct 1856 Died)
  • Michele Milella, O.P. (20 Jun 1859 Confirmed – 2 Apr 1888 Died)
  • Francesco Trotta (1 Jun 1888 – Jan 1902 Retired)
  • Alessandro Beniamino Zanecchia-Ginnetti, O.C.D. (13 Jul 1902 – 21 Feb 1920 Died)
  • Settimio Quadraroli (26 Aug 1921 – 4 Aug 1927 Died)
  • Antonio Micozzi (23 Dec 1927 – 4 Sep 1944 Died)
  • Gilla Vincenzo Gremigni, M.S.C. (18 Jan 1945 – 1951)[80]

Diocese of Teramo e AtriEdit

 
Co-cathedral in Atri

Immediately Subject to the Holy See

  • Stanislao Amilcare Battistelli, C.P. (14 Feb 1952 – 22 Feb 1967 Retired)
  • Abele Conigli (16 Feb 1967 – 31 Dec 1988 Retired)

Diocese of Teramo-AtriEdit

Organization changed: 30 September 1986

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Diocese of Teramo-Atri" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016. [self-published source] (inaccurate)
  2. ^ "Diocese of Teramo-Atri" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016. [self-published source]
  3. ^ Donald Matthew (1992). The Norman Kingdom of Sicily. Cambridge University Press. pp. 62–65, 232. ISBN 978-0-521-26911-7. Charles Hilken (2008). Memory and Community in Medieval Southern Italy: The History, Chapter Book, and Necrology of Santa Maria Del Gualdo Mazzocca. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies. pp. 9, 16. ISBN 978-0-88844-157-7.
  4. ^ Palma, Storia ecclesiastica I, pp. 173-181.
  5. ^ Palma II, p. 229. Eubel, III, p. 112, note 12: 1554 Maii 16 Jacobum ep., qui ex regio privilegio armatus armis albis fatione principatus civitatis Terami primam missam celebrare consuevit, liberat S. S. ab huiusmodi solemni celebratione ad minuendas expensas.
  6. ^ Palma, II, pp. 24-26.
  7. ^ Muzio Muzii (1893). Della storia di Teramo: dalle origini all'anno 1559 : dialoghi sette (in Italian). Teramo: Corriere Abruzzese. pp. 125–127.
  8. ^ Palma, II, pp. 95-105.
  9. ^ Palma, II, pp. 240-267, giving summaries.
  10. ^ The diocese of Campli was established by Pope Pius V in 1570. It was abolished by Pius VII, in the Bull De utiliori, in: Bullarii Romani continuatio, summorum pontificum Benedicti XIV, Clementis XIII, Clementis XIV, Pii VI, Pii VII, Leonis XII et Pii VIII constitutiones litteras... complectens... (in Latin). Prato: Typ. Aldina. 1852. p. 1774., no. DCCXCVII, § 29: praeterea episcopalem ecclesiam Camplensem perpetuo supprimentes, illius civitatem et dioecesim alteri episcopali ecclesiae Aprutinae adjungimus et incorporamus. This was a consequence of the Concordat of 7 March 1818, between Pope Pius VII and King Ferdinand I of Naples. Ugo Benigni, "Teramo" in the Catholic Encyclopedia, errs in stating: "In 1818 the Diocese of Ortona, which is now only an archipresbyteral church, was incorporated with the See of Teramo." Ortona was incorporated with the diocese of Lanciano. De utiliori § 20. Cappelletti, XXI, p. 443.
  11. ^ "Dioecesium circumscriptiones": Hisce namque novissimis temporibus Piscaría urbs dioecesis Pinnensis, quae ad maris Adriatici oras iacet, tale incrementum sumpsit, ut, magni facta nominis civitas, merito eiusdem nominis Provinciae caput evaserit. Haec Piscaría urbs nunc ex unione efformata est duorum iam prius exsistentium oppidorum : quorum alterum, Piscaría nuncupatum, ad Theatinam archidioecesim pertinet; alterum vero, cui nomen Castrum Maris Adriatici, intra fines exstat dioecesis Pinnensis; ita ut nova Piscaría urbs partim Archiepiscopi Theatini, partim Episcopi Pinnensis iurisdictioni subiecta est.
  12. ^ "Dioecesium circumscriptiones", Acta Apostolicae Sedis 42 (1950), pp. 135–137.
  13. ^ "Dioecesium circumscriptiones", p. 136, nos. 2-10.
  14. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis Volume LXXIX (Citta del Vaticano 1987), pp. 645-647.
  15. ^ Chiesa di Teramo-Atri, Seminaristi diocesani; retrieved: 2 February 2019. (in Italian)
  16. ^ Pope Gregory I wrote to Bishop Passivus of Fermo, authorizing him to consecrate an oratory built by Count Anione in Castrum Apruntinum. P. Jaffe and S. Lowenfeld, Regesta pontificum Romanorum I, second edition (Leipzig: Veit 1885), p. 186, no. 1596. Lanzoni, p. 399.
  17. ^ Opportunus: Palma, I, pp. 89-91. Lanzoni, p. 399.
  18. ^ Bishop Sigismundus was present at the coronation of Louis II of Italy as King of the Lombards, performed by Pope Sergius II at the Vatican Basilica on 15 June 844. Cappelletti, XXI, p. 429.
  19. ^ Joannes was one of three bishops appointed by Pope John VIII on 20 November 879 to deal with the matter of a widow forced to take the veil by the deceased's brother. Kehr, IV, p. 312 no. 5.
  20. ^ Landulfus: Schwartz, p. 291.
  21. ^ Petrus: Schwartz, p. 291, with note 1, who wonders whether they were two persons, as posited by Palma and Gams.
  22. ^ Bertoldus: Schwartz, p. 292.
  23. ^ Ugo was a supporter of Pope Gregory VII against the Emperor and the schismatic bishops who had attempted to depose him. Schwartz, p. 293.
  24. ^ Sanso: Ughelli, I, p. 352. Schwartz, p. 291.
  25. ^ In 1056, Pope Victor II invested Bishop Petrus with the castello de la Vitice. Kehr, p. 312, nos. 6-8. Schwartz, p. 292, indicates Bishop Petrus may have died in 1069.
  26. ^ Guido: Schwartz, p. 293.
  27. ^ Ubertus (Umbertus): Schwartz, p. 293.
  28. ^ Berardus died on 19 December 1122, in the seventh year of his episcopate. Palma, Storia ecclesiastica I, pp. 139-151. Schwartz, p. 293.
  29. ^ On 27 November 1153, Pope Anastasius IV confirmed all the parish boundaries of the diocese, and inhibited the local monks from baptizing and carrying out extreme unction in their precincts. Kehr, p. 313, no. 13. Gams assigns the dates of 1123 – 7 February 1170 to Bishop Guido's tenure.
  30. ^ Dionysius was said to have been a priest of Brindisi. Palma, I, pp. 184-185. Gams, p. 932.
  31. ^ Atto (Otto): Palma, I, pp. 185-186. Gams, p. 932 (giving the dates 1174–1203).
  32. ^ Saxo: Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 95.
  33. ^ Atto: An election of a new bishop had taken place in 1220, but on 7 August 1220 Pope Honorius III vacated the election and ordered a new election. Palma, II, p. 13. Eubel, p. 95 with note 1.
  34. ^ Silvester was already bishop by 1232. He died in 1235. Palma, II, pp. 13-14. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  35. ^ Palma, II, p. 14.
  36. ^ Matteo de Bellanto (Balato) had been a Canon of the cathedral Chapter of Teramo. He was approved by Pope Clement IV on 31 December 1252. He died in 1267. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  37. ^ Gentilis: Gams, p. 932. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  38. ^ Rainaldus had been a Canon of the cathedral of Chieti. He was elected by the chapter of Teramo and approved by Pope Gregory X. Gams, p. 932 column 1. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  39. ^ Rogerius had been a Canon of the Chapter of Teramo. He was elected bishop by the Chapter and approved by Pope Martin IV, who had quashed the election of Fra Hugolino Brunforte. Gams, p. 932, states that he died on 14 February 1294. Eubel, I, p. 95, with notes 4 and 5.
  40. ^ Franciscus had been provided by Pope Celestine V, whose acts were cancelled by Pope Boniface VIII. Pope Boniface appointed Franciscus on 12 December 1295. Gams states that he died in 1300. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  41. ^ Rainaldus was approved by Boniface VIII on 6 November 1301. Gams, p. 932, states that Rainaldus died on 14 May 1314. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  42. ^ Nicolaus: There had been a disputed election. Pope John XXII rejected both the claimants, Canon Nicolaus Andreae of Chieti and Fra Guilelmo de Civitelli, O.Min., and appointed Nicolaus Arcioni a Canon of Trani. Gams, p. 932. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  43. ^ Stephanus was a Canon of Teramo. He was appointed bishop of Teramo by Pope Innocent VI on 31 July 1355. He died in 1363. His latest document is dated 31 May 1363. In 1363 the great plague struck Teramo. Gams, p. 932. Palma, II, pp. 69-72. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  44. ^ Pietro was a Canon of Teramo, and held a licenciate in Canon Law. He was appointed bishop by Pope Urban V on 20 December 1363. He died on 22 February 1396. Gams, p. 932. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  45. ^ Corrado, a citizen of Teramo and a Canon of the cathedral Chapter, was appointed by Pope Boniface IX on 27 March 1396. The latest reference to him occurs on 14 January 1405. Palma, II, pp. 88-89. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  46. ^ Antonio was the nephew of Bishop Conradus de Melatino. He was appointed by Pope Innocent VII on 19 November 1405. Palma, II, p. 89. Eubel, I, p. 95.
  47. ^ Marinus de Tocco was appointed by Pope Gregory XII on 14 February 1407. Palma, Storia ecclesiastica II, p. 94, produces a document showing that Bishop Stephanus was already in office on 9 May 1411. The date of Bishop Marino's alleged deposition as a follower of Pope Gregory XII (Roman Obedience) was not in 1412, as Ughelli surmised. Marinus attended the Council of Constance as an Auditor. He was transferred to the diocese of Recanati e Macerata by Pope Martin V on 6 July 1418 (Eubel, II, p. 411). Cf. Eubel, I, p. 95, who claims that Bishop Stephanus was not appointed until 3 October 1412.
  48. ^ Stephanus belonged to a noble family of Padua, and he was Administrator of the diocese of Padua from 1402 to 1406. He and his family were driven out of Padua by the Venetians in 1406, and he was made Administrator of the diocese of Nicosia (Cyprus), though he was allowed to keep the office of Archdeacon of Padua. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo by Pope John XXIII on 3 October 1412. He was transferred to the diocese of Tricarico on 29 October 1427 by Pope Martin V, which he resigned in 1431. On 9 February 1433 he was named Bishop of Rossano by Pope Eugene IV. Palma, II, 95-97, 108. Eubel, I, p. 95, 366, 407; II, p. 224.
  49. ^ Guidalotti was appointed by Pope Martin V on 29 October 1427. He was transferred to the diocese of Recanati on 7 January 1429. Eubel, I, pp. 95, 411.
  50. ^ Giacomo Serretani a Canon of Bordeaux, and secretary of Pope Martin. He was named Bishop of Teramo by Pope Martin V on 7 January 1429. Eubel, I, pp. 95.
  51. ^ Monaldeschi had been Bishop of Orvieto (1418–1443), though under the minimum age when appointed. He was named Bishop of Teramo on 6 September 1443. He was transferred to the diocese of Ascoli Piceno on 25 September 1450. He died in 1461. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica I, p. 509; II, pp. 90, 96.
  52. ^ Fatati was named bishop of Teramo on 6 November 1450. He was appointed Bishop of Ancona e Numana on 3 November 1463 by Pope Pius II. Gams, p. 932.
  53. ^ A priest of the diocese of Teano, Campani had previously been Bishop of Cotrone (1462–1463). He was named Bishop of Teramo on 23 May 1463. In 1476 he removed himself to Siena, due to reasons of health, where he died on 7 July 1477. Palma, II, pp. 144-149, 154-155. Eubel, II, pp. 90, 138.
  54. ^ Perez (Perets) was named Bishop of Teramo by Pope Sixtus IV on 9 October 1479. He was appointed Archbishop of Taranto on 26 October 1489 by Pope Innocent VIII. Gams, p. 932.
  55. ^ Petrucci had been Bishop of Taranto. He exchanged dioceses with Bishop de Perets on 26 October 1489. He was appointed Bishop of Caserta, with the personal title of Archbishop, by Pope Clement VIII on 18 October 1493. Palma, II, pp. 184-185. Eubel, II, p. 90.
  56. ^ A native of Rome, Camillus de Porcariis had been a professor of rhetoric at the Roman Archgymnasium, and Canon of the Vatican Basilica since March 1508. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 4 May 1517 by Pope Leo X. He died in 1522, his successor being appointed on 7 September. Palma believes that Camillo never visited his diocese, being confined in Rome by a serious and ultimately fatal disease. The catalogue of the Bishops of Teramo describes his condition: Is tamen, simul ac a Leone X. Pontifice Maximo Aprutina est Ecclesiae praefectus, acerbissima cujusdam diuturni morbi, nulli Medicorum cogniti, correptus inclementia; postguam miserabili cruciatu menses plurimos decubuit afflictatus, morbidemum truculentia, et totius corporis doloribus oppressus, virenti adhuc aetate, animam degit: incredibili apud omnes suo relicto desiderio. Palma, II, pp. 217-219. Eubel, III, p. 112, with note 3.
  57. ^ Cherigatto was a native of Vicenza, and had been a personal friend of Pope Leo X, who sent him on an embassy to Prussia and Russia. His appointment as Bishop of Teramo had to wait for the arrival of Pope Adrian VI from Spain and his coronation in August 1522 for the bulls to be signed, on 7 September 1522. Even so, Cherigatto had not yet been to Teramo in January of 1524. He continued in service to the popes. In November 1528 he was in Rome, and therefore appointed his brother Lodovico as his locumtenens. In 1529 he was governor of Viterbo. He was in Rome in 1530, where he named his brother Gregorio as Vicar General of his brother Lodovico. He also travelled to Venice in that year. He died in November 1539, the last entry in his bullarium having the date of 8 November. The legal notice of his death arrived from Rome in Teramo on 27 November. Palma, II, pp. 209-231; III, pp. 12-14. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica III, p. 112.
  58. ^ Guidiccioni was appointed Bishop of Teramo by Pope Paul III on 12 December 1539. On 22 November 1539 he had been appointed Papal Vicar for the city of Rome, a clear indication that Teramo was a benefice, and that Guidiccioni would not be a resident bishop. A week later, on 19 December, he was named a Cardinal. Because of the press of his duties in the Roman Curia, he resigned the diocese of Teramo on 22 March 1542. He was not consecrated a bishop, however, until 1546. Palma, III, p. 15. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica III, p. 112.
  59. ^ Silverii-Piccolomini was a Protonotary Apostolic and an Apostolic Subdeacon. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 19 April 1542 by Pope Paul III. He was transferred to the diocese of Sorrento by Pope Paul III on 13 April 1545. He died in October 1552. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica III, p. 112, 306.
  60. ^ Barba was named Bishop of Teramo by Pope Paul III on 26 May 1546. Barba was appointed Bishop of Terni (Interamna) on 3 July 1553 by Pope Julius III. He died in 1565. "Bishop Giovanni Giacomo (Jean Jacques) Barba, O.S.A." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016.[self-published source] Eubel, III, p. 112, 213.
  61. ^ Silverii-Piccolomini was appointed by Pope Julius III at the age of twenty-five on 30 August 1553, following the transfer of Bishop Barba to Terni. He died on 16 September 1581. Palma, III, pp. 25-26, 44-46, 60-66. Eubel, III, p. 112.
  62. ^ Ricci had previously been Bishop of Murano (1572–1575) and Bishop of Gravina (1575–1581). He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 13 November 1581 by Pope Gregory XIII. He held a diocesan synod in 1587. He lived his last year in Campli, alienated from his own cathedral Chapter, and died there on 3 July 1592. Palma, III, pp. 66-67, 71. Eubel, III, pp. 112, 205, 251 with note 10.
  63. ^ Bugiatti had been Commissary of the Office of the Roman and Universal Inquisition. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 23 October 1592 by Pope Clement VIII. He died on 6 January 1609. Palma, III, pp. 83-85; 101-103. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 88 with note 2.
  64. ^ "Bishop Giambattista Visconti, O.S.A." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved October 7, 2016. [self-published source] Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 88 with note 3.
  65. ^ Figini-Oddi was a member of the Milanese family of the Counts of Figini-Oddi. He studied law at the University of Parma, and obtained the degree of Doctor in utroque iure. He held the position of papal Referendary of the Tribunal of the Two Signatures. He governed the city of Città di Castello, and several others. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 9 February 1639. He died on 24 August 1659; Cardinal Chigi wrote a letter of condolence on behalf of Pope Alexander VII on 6 September 1659. Palma, III, pp. 123-125; 139-141. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 88.
  66. ^ Mausoni was a native of L'Aquila. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 10 November 1659 by Pope Alexander VII. He died on 4 September 1665, and was buried in the cathedral on 6 September. Palma, III, pp. 141-142. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 88.
  67. ^ De Monti was a native of Fermo. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure, and was Inquisitor General in the Kingdom of Naples. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 11 January 1666. He was transferred to the diocese of Ascoli Piceno on 2 June 1670. He died on 24 December 1680. Palma, III, pp. 143-144. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 88, with note 6. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 100 with note 2.
  68. ^ Armenio was a native of Penne, and was appointed Vicar General of the diocese of Penne in 1648. He was named Bishop of Teramo on 28 July 1670, and was consecrated in Rome on 10 August 1670 by the titular archbishop of Tarsus, Francesco Maria Febei (Phoebeus). He died on 25 May 1693. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 91 with note 2.
  69. ^ Cassiani was born in Terra Nova (Rossano), and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the University of Naples. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 24 August 1693 by Pope Innocent XII, and consecrated in Rome on 20 September by Cardinal Galeazzo Marescotti. He died on 5 November 1715. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 91 with note 3.
  70. ^ Riganti was born in Molfetta in 1666. In 1719, at the age of fifty-three, he became a priest and obtained the degree of Doctor in utroque iure from the Sapienza in Rome. He was named Bishop of Teramo on 29 March 1719, and was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Lorenzo Corsini on 16 April 1719. He took possession of the diocese on 23 August. He died on 3 November 1720. Palma. III, p. 198. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 91 with note 4.
  71. ^ Tansi was born in Materana in 1668, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Sapienza, Rome 1699). He was Vicar General of the diocese of Salerno, and was appointed Vicar Apostolic of the diocese of L'Aquila. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 16 July 1721 by Pope Innocent XIII, and consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Giovanni Battista Bussi on 25 July. He died on 18 July 1723. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 91 with note 5.
  72. ^ Scorza was born in Torremaggiore (S. Severo) in 1676, and held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Sapienza, Rome 1704). He was appointed Vicar General of Recanati, then Fossombrone, and then Rimini. He was named Bishop of Teramo on 12 June 1724 by Pope Benedict XIII, and was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 24 June 1724 by Cardinal Lorenzo Corsini. He was transferred to the diocese of Amalfi by Pope Clement XII on 9 April 1731. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 91 with note 6; VI, p. 78.
  73. ^ Rossi was born in Nardò in 1674. He was Canon and Cantor of the cathedral Chapter of Nardò. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Sapienza, Rome 1706). He was professor of Canon Law at the University of Turin. He was Vicar General and then Vicar Capitular of the diocese of Ugento. He was named Bishop of Teramo on 9 April 1731. His relations with the diocese were generally bad, and in 1746 he was forced to seek safety in Rome. His spiritual jurisdiction was entrusted to Canon Domenico Pennella, but in April 1747 the pope appointed a Vicar Apostolic, Abbot Panfilo Ginnetti. De' Rossi died in Rome of "fulminating apoplexy" on 6 January 1749. Palma, III, pp. 203, 208-209, 212. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 91 with note 2.
  74. ^ Mazzara was born in Sulmo in 1701. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure (Naples 1726). He was Rector of the College of the Annunciation in Sulmo. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo on 21 April 1749, and was consecrated a bishop in Rome on 1 May by Cardinal Giovanni Antonio Guadagni. He died on 30 August 1766. Palma, III, p. 214-217, Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 91 with note 3
  75. ^ Sambiase was born in Lecce in 1713. He taught philosophy and theology in the seminary at Messana, and Canon Law in his own religious house. He was a preacher in various cities, and finally in Vienna. He was appointed Bishop of Teramo by Pope Clement XIII on 16 February 1767, and was consecrated a bishop in Rome by Cardinal Giovanni Albani on 24 February 1767. He was transferred to the diocese of Conza on 16 December 1776. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, pp. 91 with note 4; 177 with note 5.
  76. ^ Pirelli was born in Ariano in 1740. He became secretary of the Provost General of the Theatine Order, and was a Consultor at the Congregation of Indulgences and Relics in the Roman Curia. He was named Bishop of Teramo e Atri on 17 February 1777 by Pope Pius VI, and was consecrated a bishop in Rome by Cardinal Giovanni Albani on 23 February 1777. He was appointed Archbishop of Trani by Pope Pius VII on 29 October 1804. He died on 15 July 1820. Palma, III, pp. 231-241. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, pp. 91 with note 5.
  77. ^ Nanni was a native of Avezzano, south of L'Aquila. Nominated by King Ferdinand of Naples, Nanni was confirmed by Pope Pius VII on 26 June 1805. Nanni resigned on 8 March 1822, and died on 29 December 1822. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, p. 82.
  78. ^ Pezzella was a doctor of theology, and had been Commissary General of his Order. He was nominated bishop on 20 June 1823, and approved by Pope Leo XII on 24 November 1823. He resigned on 18 June 1828, and on 23 June was confirmed as Coadjutor Bishop of Calvi e Teano, and was named titular bishop of Zela. He died on 3 January 1833. Palma, III, pp. 298-302. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, p. 82.
  79. ^ Berettini (Berrettini) was born in L'Aquila in 1765. He had been Archdeacon of the Cathedral Chapter, and lecturer at the seminary of Aquila. He was approved as bishop of Teramo on 5 July 1830 by Pope Pius VIII. He died on 29 October 1849. Notizie per l'anno 1834 (in Italian). Roma: Gio. Francesco Chracas. 1834. p. 151. Ritzler-Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VII, p. 82.
  80. ^ Gremigni was appointed Bishop of Novara by Pope Pius XII on 29 June 1951.
  81. ^ Nuzzi died on 9 September 2016. Chiesa di Teramo-Atri, E’ scomparso Mons. Antonio Nuzzi, Vescovo-Arcivescovo Emerito della nostra Diocesi; retrieved: 2 February 2019. (in Italian)
  82. ^ Seccia born in Barletta in 1951. He got his degree in philosophy and theology from the Gregorian University in Rome, and a doctorate in philosophy from the Sapienza, and a licenciate in moral theology from the Alfonsianum. From 1978 he taught moral theology at the Istituto Superiore di Scienze Religiose, and then religion at the State Lyceum and of Philosophy and Pedagogy at the Magistral Institute. He was a parish priest in Barletta from 1985 to 1992. From 1987 to 1997 he was a Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Trani-Barletta-Bisceglie. Pope John Paul II appointed him Bishop of San Severo in 1997, and he was consecrated a bishop on 18 September 1997. On 24 June 2006 he was transferred by Pope Benedict XVI to the diocese of Teramo-Atri. He was elevated to be Metropolitan Archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Lecce: Vatican Press Office, press release. Chiesa di Teramo-Atri, Vescovi Emeriti: S. Ecc. Mons. Michele Seccia; retrieved: 2 February 2019. (in Italian)
  83. ^ Lorenzo Leuzzi was born in Trani in 1955. He obtained a degree in Medicine and Surgery (Bari). He studied at the Pontifical Roman Major Seminary in Rome, and became chaplain of the medical faculty of the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Rome on Monte Mario. He then became parish priest of the university, and in 1998 became director of the office for the University Pastor of the Vicariate of Rome. From 2010 to 2017, he was Rector of the Church of S. Gregorio Nazianzo and Chaplain of the Chamber of Deputies. On 16 April 2012 he was named Auxiliary Bishop of Rome by Pope Benedict XVI. On 23 November 2017 Pope Francis named him Bishop of Teramo-Atri. He is the author or editor of twenty-one books. Chiesa di Teramo-Atri, Vescovo: S.E.Mons. Lorenzo Leuzzi; retrieved: 2 February 2019. (in Italian)

BibliographyEdit

Reference works for bishopsEdit

StudiesEdit

External linksEdit

  • Benigni, Umberto. "Teramo." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 14. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. Retrieved: 30 Jan. 2019.
  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

Coordinates: 42°39′32″N 13°42′14″E / 42.6589°N 13.7039°E / 42.6589; 13.7039