Robert Charles Clarke

Robert Charles Clarke (1843-16 February 1904) was an architect based in Nottingham.[1]

The chapel, Carlton Cemetery, 1885-86
Beeston Church School, 1900

HistoryEdit

He was born in 1843, the son of Robert Clarke and went into business with his father to form Robert Clarke & Son.

He married Fanny Tinkler on 27 March 1882 at St Guthlac's Church, Branston, Leicestershire.[2]

He died on 16 February 1904 at Goverton Villa, Bleasby, Nottinghamshire, and left an estate of £1,052 (equivalent to £114,200 in 2019)[3] to his widow, Fanny Clarke.

WorksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brodie, Antonia (20 December 2001). Directory of British Architects 1834-1914: Vol 1 (A-K). Royal Institute of British Architects. p. 384. ISBN 0826455131.
  2. ^ "Births, Marriages and Deaths". Grantham Journal. England. 15 April 1882. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  3. ^ UK Retail Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Opening of Carlton Board Schools". Nottingham Journal. England. 31 December 1878. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ "New Cemetery at Carlton". Nottingham Journal. England. 4 August 1886. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. ^ "New Roman Catholic Church at Hucknall". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 6 May 1887. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ "Hucknall Torkard Parish Church". Nottingham Evening Post. England. 6 June 1888. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. ^ "Consecration of a new church at Hucknall Torkard". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 6 August 1892. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. ^ "Church Extension in Nottingham". Nottingham Evening Post. England. 23 July 1895. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ "Bazaar at Hucknall". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 6 July 1895. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. ^ "The Mundella Higher Grade Centre". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 6 May 1899. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  12. ^ Harwood, Elain (2008). Pevsner Architectural Guides. Nottingham. Yale University Press. p. 143. ISBN 9780300126662.
  13. ^ "New Church Schools for Beeston". Nottingham Evening Post. England. 3 May 1900. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.