Robert Clarke (architect)

Robert Clarke (1819 – 11 December 1877) was an architect based in Nottingham.[1]

The Witton Cemetery Anglican chapel 1859-60
Artisan’s Library, Thurland Street 1854

HistoryEdit

Born in 1819, Robert Clarke was the son of Mr. Clarke of Stoney and Clarke. He married Frances Sympson at St Martin’s Church, Lincoln, on 12 May 1841.

He studied architecture under William Adams Nicholson in Lincoln. He went into a partnership with Edmund Francis Law in Northampton in 1848.[2] This partnership was short-lived, and dissolved on 31 July 1849.[3]

In 1852, he established himself as an independent architect back in Nottingham.[4] He set up in business in Nottingham with offices in Grosvenor Place, Parliament Street. In 1854 he moved to Shakespere Street, opposite Angelo Terrace.[5]

His son, Robert Charles Clarke (1843-16 February 1904) joined his father to form Robert Clarke & Son.

He died on 11 December 1877 in Sneinton, Nottingham[6] and left a small estate to his widow, Frances Clarke.

WorksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brodie, Antonia (20 December 2001). Directory of British Architects 1834-1914: Vol 1 (A-K). Royal Institute of British Architects. p. 384. ISBN 0826455131.
  2. ^ "E.F. Law, Architect and Surveyor". Northampton Mercury. England. 17 June 1848. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  3. ^ "Notice is hereby given...". Northampton Mercury. England. 4 August 1849. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  4. ^ "Robert Clarke". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 5 February 1852. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ "Mr. R. Clarke". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 14 December 1854. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  6. ^ "Death of Mr. Robert Clarke". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 14 December 1877. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ "We have much pleasure in announcing". Nottingham Review and General Advertiser. England. 16 June 1843. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. ^ "New weighing machine". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 24 June 1852. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. ^ "Opening of the New Theatre". Nottinghamshire Guardian. England. 13 July 1854. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ Historic England, "Journal Chambers (1059032)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 January 2018
  11. ^ "New Church of St John, Carlisle". Nottingham Journal. England. 13 February 1864. Retrieved 6 January 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.