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Richard Toye Fellow of RHistS is a Professor in the Department of History and Head of History at the University of Exeter. He was previously a Fellow and Director of Studies for History at Homerton College, University of Cambridge, from 2002 to 2007, and before that he taught at University of Manchester from 2000.

Richard Toye
BornRichard Toye
1973
Cambridge, England
OccupationHistorian
NationalityBritish

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Toye was born in Cambridge, but subsequently moved to Swansea and then to Hove, Sussex. He took a BA in History and then a M Phil at University of Birmingham. He achieved at PhD at Cambridge.[citation needed]

BiographyEdit

His book Lloyd George and Churchill: Rivals for Greatness was the winner of the Times Higher Young Academic Author of the Year Award in 2007. One of the judges, June Purvis, professor of women's and gender history at Portsmouth University, said: "This is an extremely readable, lively book that explores the complex personal and political relationship between two great male politicians who helped to shape 20th-century Britain. The changing shades and hues of their relationship are documented in fascinating detail." It received widespread critical acclaim from a number of newspaper reviews for its "nuanced" approach. He has written extensively on Winston Churchill: his book Churchill's Empire: The World that Made Him and the World He Made[1] was critically acclaimed. His most recent book is The Roar of the Lion: The Untold Story of Churchill's World War II Speeches.[2] Toye has also written on Rhetoric.[3] In late 2018 he appeared in the documentary Churchill's mistress discussing the fate of Dora, Lady Castlerosse broadcast on Yesterday (TV channel).[4] At Exeter he specialises in teaching and researching Churchill and all aspects of party politics during the period of the Third British Empire.[5] Commensurate with his role as a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society he was one of the signatories to a letter that strongly defended the Historical Association: government attempts to depoliticise the teaching profession have been largely unsuccessful.[6]

BooksEdit

  • Arguing About Empire: Imperial Rhetoric in Britain and France, 1882-1956 with Prof. Martin Thomas (OUP 2017)
  • Rhetorics of Empire: Languages of Colonial Conflict after 1900 (Studies in Imperialism) (Manchester University Press, 2017)
  • Winston Churchill: Politics, Strategy and Statecraft (Bloomsbury Academic, 2017)
  • The Roar of the Lion: The Untold Story of Churchill's World War II Speeches (Oxford University Press, 2013)
  • with Julie Gottlieb, The Aftermath of Suffrage: Women, Gender, and Politics in Britain, 1918-1945 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013)
  • Rhetoric: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2013)
  • Churchill's Empire: The World That Made Him and the World He Made, (Macmillan, 2010)
  • Lloyd George and Churchill: Rivals for Greatness, (Macmillan, 2007)
  • with Gottlieb J, Making Reputations: Power, Persuasion and the Individual in Modern British Politics, (I.B. Tauris, 2005)
  • with Toye J, The UN and Global Political Economy: Trade, Finance and Development (Indiana University Press, 2004)
  • The Labour Party and the Planned Economy, 1931-1951, (Royal Historical Society, 2003)

Academic publicationsEdit

  • 'The Rhetorical Culture of the House of Commons after 1918,' History: The Journal of the Historical Association, 99 (335), 270-298.
  • 'Keynes, Liberalism, and The Emancipation of the Mind, The English Historical Review, cev215-cev215.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ published by Macmillan, 2010
  2. ^ published by Oxford University Press, 2013
  3. ^ Richard Toye
  4. ^ the programme was repeated on 15 December 2018.
  5. ^ and research
  6. ^ . 14 May 2013 http://richardtoye.blogspot.com/2013/05/in-defence-of-historical-association.html. Retrieved 16 December 2018. Missing or empty |title= (help)

External linksEdit