List of Kent county cricketers to 1842

This is a list of cricketers who played for Kent county cricket teams in first-class cricket matches before the formation of the first Kent County Cricket Club in August 1842.

Cricket is generally believed to have originated out of children's bat and ball games in the areas of the Weald and North and South Downs in Kent and Sussex.[1][2] The two counties and Surrey were the first centres of the game and the first known inter-county match took place between a Kent side and one from Surrey on Dartford Brent in 1709.[3][4] Matches played by teams using the name Kent continued throughout the 18th century, and matches by the side have been considered first-class from 1773.[a][5][6]

Although there were attempts to form County Clubs at Coxheath in 1787 and at Town Malling between 1835 and 1841, both of these ultimately failed and the first Kent County Cricket Club was established out of the Beverley Cricket Club during Canterbury Cricket Week in 1842.[7][8][9] The new club played its first first-class match against an England side at White Hart Field in Bromley on 25–27 August 1842.[b][3]

This list includes those who played for Kent sides in matches which have been given first-class status before the match at Bromley in August 1842.[c] Many players appeared for other teams, including the East and West Kent cricket teams and the amateur Gentlemen of Kent side, but only those who played for Kent sides have been included here.

A edit

Name Matches[A] Seasons[B] Notes Ref
Tom Adams 99* 1836–1858 A professional who was instrumental in establishing the Bat and Ball Ground at Gravesend, Adams made a total of 157 first-class appearances, including for MCC and various England XIs, as well as playing twice for the Gentlemen of Kent, four times for a combined Kent and Sussex side and twice for a combined Kent and Surrey side. [12][13][14][15][16][17]
Benjamin Aislabie 1 1823 Played in a total of 56 first-class matches, one of which was for Kent against MCC at Lord's in 1823. Aislabie was the first Honorary Secretary of MCC, serving between 1822 and his death in 1842. [18][19]
Stephen Amherst 18* 1786–1795 Amherst was an important patron of cricket in Kent and built an indoor training centre for bowler Thomas Boxall. He played in a total of 31 first-class matches, including 18 for Kent, one for the Gentlemen of Kent, three for West Kent and one for East Kent. There are some doubts over how Amherst's surname was spelled, with some sources using the spelling "Amhurst". [20][21][22]
William Ashby 14 1815–1829 Ashby was employed as a carpenter by Kent landowner John Willes. He played in a total of 45 first-class matches, including 14 for Kent sides, 14 for England XIs and nine for the Players. [23]
Robert Ayling 2 1796 Both of Ayling's first-class matches were for Kent against Middlesex sides in 1796 and he is known to have played in an odds match[d] for a Kent side in 1807. May have been the brother of William Ayling. [24][25]
William Ayling 1 1806 Ayling made a total of 22 first-class appearances, including playing in both of the first Gentlemen v Players matches and 14 times for England sides. As well as his single first-class match for Kent in 1806 he appeared in a number of odds matches[d] for Kent sides. [25][26]
James Aylward 32* 1779–1793 A prominent left-handed batsman, Aylward played in a total of 107 first-class matches between 1773 and 1797. He was a member of the Hambledon Club in Hampshire before Sir Horatio Mann, a noted Kent patron, employed him as a water bailiff at Bourne Park House in 1779, after which he played mainly for Kent sides as "Kent’s first batsman of true class".[27] As well as 32 matches for Kent, he played four times for East Kent, once for both the Gentlemen of Kent and a combined Kent and Hampshire side and three times for Mann's XI. In 1777 Aylward set a record score of 167 runs whilst playing for an England side at Sevenoaks Vine. This remained the record first-class score until 1820. He later became the landlord of The White Horse at Bridge. [8][28][29][30][31][32][33]

B edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
James Bray Baker 4 1825–1826 Baker was a member of the Hawkhurst club close to the Sussex–Kent border. He played most of his cricket for Sussex sides, with four of his 15 first-class matches played for Kent XIs as a given man[e] against Sussex. [35][36][37]
Samson Baker 1 1823 One appearance for a Kent side against MCC. There are significant doubts over the identity of this player. Scores and Biographies identifies him as James Baker and Kent Cricket Matches 1719–1880 as JB Baker and there is the possibility that it was James Bray Baker who played in this match, although this is considered unlikely. An S Baker played for sides in the Leeds area of Kent in the 1820s and it is probably this player. CricInfo and CricketArchive both give him the forename Samson and a Samson Baker has been identified as living in the nearby Lenham area of Kent, but there is no conclusive evidence that these were the same person. [36][38][39]
William de Chair Baker 14* 1841–1853 A member of the Beverley Club in Canterbury which was the basis for the first Kent County Club in 1842, Baker was Secretary of Canterbury Cricket Week from its inception until his death in 1888. As well as 14 matches for Kent sides, both before and after the County Club was established, he played in six first-class matches for the Gentlemen of Kent, all during Canterbury Cricket Weeks between 1842 and 1848. [40][41]
Henry Barnard 2 1815–1823 Two of Barnard's five first-class matches were for Kent sides. His brother, John Barnard, also played for Kent whilst another brother, George also played first-class cricket. [42][43]
John Barnard 3 1815–1822 Brother of Henry Barnard, John Barnard played in a total of 18 first-class matches. He was President of MCC in 1829–30. [44]
William Barton 1 1796 Barton played for a wide variety of sides, making a total of 37 first-class appearances, including 13 for England XIs. [45][46]
Horace Bates 4 1823–1826 Four of Bates' nine first-class matches were for Kent sides, with the other five all being for The Bs. He was a miller and butcher and played in village cricket for sides in the area west of Maidstone, including Bearsted, Lenham and Leeds as well as for the Players of Kent.[f] [48][49]
Thomas Battersbee 1 1822 Battersebee's only first-class appearance was as a mid-match replacement for John Willes against MCC at Lord's in 1822. Willes had attempted to bowl roundarm style and been no-balled, at which point he left the ground and was probably replaced by Battersebee. [50]
Emilius Bayley 9* 1842–1844 Bayley appeared in a total of 29 first-class matches, including nine for Kent and six for the Gentlemen of Kent. He first played for the side in 1842 and was one of the players who played in the first match of the Kent County Club later during the year. His brother, Lyttleton Bayley, also played first-class cricket for Kent in the 1840s, and his father, Sir John Bayley, played 11 first-class matches for a variety of sides. [51][52]
J Bayton[g] 1 1776 Bayton is known to have played in two cricket matches, both of them first-class matches against the Hambledon Club. His appearance for a Kent side in 1776 was followed by one for an England XI the following year. Other than a surname and initial, no biographical details are certain, although it is probable that Bayton was linked to Hambledon and was a replacement for an absent Kent player. His surname is sometimes spelled Boyton or Boynton and his forename was probably John, although it may have been George. [53][54][55]
Lord Frederick Beauclerk 1 1806 A highly influential figure in cricket at the beginning of the 19th century, Beauclerk played one of his 129 first-class matches for Kent, playing as a given man[e] against an England XI at Bowman's Lodge in 1806. [56][57]
William Bedster 4* 1781–1792 Four of Bedster's 59 first-class appearances were for Kent sides, with another two coming for West Kent. Bedster was employed as a butler by Charles Bennet, 4th Earl of Tankerville who employed a number of well-known cricketers towards the end of the 18th century. [58][59]
William Beldham 7* 1792–1806 One of the best batsmen of his era, Beldham played in 189 first-class matches for a wide variety of sides. He appeared six times for Kent sides between 1792 and 1795 before playing in one match as a given man[e] in 1806. He also appeared twice for West Kent in 1789 and in a single match for a Surrey and Kent combined side in 1796. [60][61][62]
George Betts 1 1835 After playing for the Gentlemen against the Players in 1832, Betts played his other first-class match for a Kent side in 1835. He played club cricket for Lenham and Bearsted and later for Gravesend Cricket Club and appeared in a non-first-class match for a Kent side in 1836. He was a butcher and influential cattle dealer. [63]
Edward Bligh 8* 1790–1806 The younger brother of John Bligh, 4th Earl of Darnley who played for Kent during the same period, Bligh played eight of his 76 first-class matches for Kent sides as well as another one for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1791. [64][65][66]
Francis Booker 23* 1773–1788 A left-handed batsman from Eynsford, Booker played in a total of 45 first-class matches. As well as his 23 for Kent sides, he played in two first-class matches for West Kent. He was briefly mentioned in John Nyren's book, The Cricketers of My Time, described as one of three players Nyren considered to be "excellent and steady batters, strong hitters, and sure fields". [67][68]
James Boorman[h] 23* 1776–1790 As well as his 23 matches for Kent sides, Boorman played twice for West Kent and twice for East Kent. He made a total of 55 appearances in first-class matches. [69][70]
William Bowra 19* 1775–1788 Bowra was one of several cricketers employed by John Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset at Knole Park near Sevenoaks, in Bowra's case as a gamekeeper. He played 19 of his 50 first-class matches for Kent sides and also appeared twice for West Kent and once for a combined Hampshire and Kent side in first-class matches. [34][71][72][73]
Thomas Boxall 15* 1789–1796 As well as 15 first-class matches for Kent sides, Boxall, who was a noted bowler, played three times for combined Surrey and Kent XIs and once for West Kent and for a combined Hampshire and Kent side. Boxall is believed to be the first player to have bowled leg breaks and in 1801 published the first known manual for playing cricket, Rules and Instructions for playing at the Game of Cricket. [21][74]
James Bray 2 1826 A gamekeeper who was part of Hawkhurst Cricket Club on the Kent/Sussex border, Bray played in eight first-class matches, two of which were for Kent against Sussex in 1826. [75]
William Brazier 28* 1774–1792 Brazier played in a total of 50 first-class matches, 28 of which were for Kent sides. He also played four times for West Kent and once for a combined Hampshire and Kent XI. [76]
Jem Broadbridge 2 1828 An all-rounder who played in 102 first-class matches, both of Broadbridge's matches for Kent were as a given man[e] against Surrey sides in 1828. [77][78]
T Browning 1 1795 The brother of William Browning, Browning played a single first-class match, a game against an England XI at Penenden Heath in 1795. He is known to have played in club matches for Town Malling and Twelve Miles Round in 1799.[i] Other than a surname and initial, no biographical details are known. [79]
William Browning 1* 1795 After having played for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1791, Browning played his other first-class match for a Kent XI in 1795, playing alongside his brother against an England XI at Penenden Heath. Other than his name, no biographical details are known. [80]
William Bullen 45* 1774–1796 As well as 45 matches for Kent sides, Bullen played five times for West Kent, twice for a combined Hampshire and Kent XI and once for the Gentlemen of Kent in first-class matches. In total he played in 113 first-class matches between 1773 and 1797. Other than his name, no biographical details are known. [81]
J Burgess[j] 1 1794 Burgess played in two first-class matches, one for a Kent side in 1794 and the other for Sir Horatio Mann's XI in 1795. He is known to have played for Woolwich Cricket Club between 1799 and 1803. His forename may have been John, but no biographical information beyond this is known. [82][83]
Peter Burrell 2 1788–1789 Burrell, who became the first Baron Gwydyr in 1796, played in seven first-class matches, including two for Kent sides. He was a founding member of MCC. [84]
Anthony Burton 2 1822 Both of Burton's first-class matches were for Kent sides against MCC in 1822. He played club cricket for a variety of teams in west Kent and in two matches for the Players of Kent,[f] one in each of 1826 and 1827. [85][86]
Butcher 3* 1790–1793 Butcher played in 23 first-class matches, including three for Kent and one for the Gentlemen of Kent in the early 1790s. He played most frequently for Surrey sides, although other than his surname, no biographical details are known. [87]

C edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Caesar 1 1828 Played his only match for a Kent side against one from Surrey at Godalming in 1828, possibly as a replacement for an established player.[k] Other than a surname, no biographical details are known although it is thought likely that Caesar was a relative of the Surrey cricketer Julius Caesar who was born in the town in 1830 and whose family is known to have played cricket in the area. [89]
Will Caldecourt 3 1827–1828 All three of Caldecourt's matches for Kent were probably as a replacement for a missing player. He was a well-known and respected umpire who was also a member of the Lord's ground staff and played in 42 first-class matches in total. [90][91]
Thomas Calhoun 1 1827 Played in a single known match, probably as a replacement for a missing player in a match at Brighton, scoring one run in his two innings. Calhoun was a clergyman who later became the vicar of Goring-by-Sea. [92]
Lewis Carrick 1 1828 Played a single first-class match against MCC at Lord's without scoring a run in his only innings. Carrick was a member of the Updown club, a strong club side which had been formed near Sandwich. There are some doubts regarding his identity and in the 1907 History of Kent County Cricket he is listed as Garrick. [93]
George Claridge 8 1827–1829 A solicitor, Claridge played club cricket across London and west Kent and later became a patron of the game at his native Sevenoaks. Eight of his 10 first-class matches were played for Kent sides, with the other two for Hampshire XIs, usually as a wicket-keeper. [94]
Robert Clifford 31* 1779–1792 Clifford played in a total of 71 first-class matches. Other than his 31 matches for Kent sides, he played three matches for West Kent, two for East Kent and one for a combined Hampshire and Kent side. He played 19 times for England XIs as an effective bowler of underarm leg breaks despite having a deformed bowling hand. Two grandsons, William Clifford and Francis Clifford also played for Kent sides. [95][96][97][98]
William Clifford 17 1834–1841 A player renowned as one of the best batsmen in the Kent side, Clifford played 17 of his 29 first-class matches for Kent. He often played as a wicket-keeper and in 1841 opened a cricket ground, Rucks Lane, at Gravesend.[l] He died the same year probably aged less than 30. [99][101]
John Cocker 1 1842 Although he only played a single first-class match, just before the first Kent County Club was established in 1842, Cocker was an important figure in the development of cricket in South Australia. He emigrated in 1846 and was a key figure in the Adelaide Cricket Club before going on to become the first curator of the ground which became the Adelaide Oval and has been referred to as the "father of South Australian cricket". [102][103][104]
Samuel Colchin 4 1774–1776 Colchin played in a total of 10 first-class matches, four of which were for Kent sides, all as a given man[e] against Hampshire sides. He was the nephew of Robert Colchin, a noted single wicket cricketer of the first half of the 18th century. [105][106]
Collier 1 1786 A single first-class match for Kent against White Conduit Club at Bourne Paddock, the ground established by Sir Horatio Mann at his estate at Bourne Park House. Collier scored 49 runs, including 35 in one innings, a significant score at the time. Other than this match he is not known to have played any other cricket and no biographical details are known, although he may have come from nearby Canterbury.[m] [107][108]
Couchman 1* 1786 As well as his single match for Kent, Couchman played in a first-class match for West Kent against East Kent in 1783. Both matches took place at Sevenoaks Vine and Couchman scored a total of 15 runs, with a highest score of nine. No further biographical details are known, although he may have been from either Seal or Ightham, both villages close to Sevenoaks. [22][109]
John Crawte 13* 1789–1792 Crawte was considered a fine batsman who played David Harris, the best bowler of the era, better than any other player. He was originally from Alresford in Hampshire but was employed by Stephen Amherst, a Kent patron towards the end of the 18th century. Crawte played in a total of 57 first-class matches, including three for West Kent between 1789 and 1790 and two for a combined Surrey and Kent side in 1794. He continued to play non-first-class cricket for Kent sides, including for Rochester, into the early 1800s. [110][111]
Henry Crosoer 5* 1786–1789 As well as his five matches for Kent sides, Crosoer played twice for East Kent and once for an A to C side in first-class matches. He was born at Bridge near Canterbury in around 1865. [112][113][114]
Charles Cumberland 1* 1793 As well as his one appearance for Kent in first-class cricket, Cumberland played once for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1791. He played in a total of 26 first-class matches, most frequently for MCC. [115]

D edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
James Dark 1 1827 Dark played 17 first-class matches, including one for Kent, but it better known as the owner of Lord's between 1835 and 1864. [116]
Earl of Darnley 8* 1790–1796 The Earls of Darnley were closely associated with cricket in Kent, particularly in the Cobham and Gravesend area, and a number of the Bligh family played for the county side. John Bligh, who had become the fourth Earl in 1781, played eight of his 24 first-class matches for Kent and one for the Gentlemen of Kent. [66][117]
John Brewer Davis 2 1773 Both of Davis' first-class matches were the first that Kent sides played to have been given that status. He was part of the group which laid down a set of Laws of Cricket in 1774. [118][119]
James Davis 1* 1828 A publican who played four first-class matches, including one for Kent in 1828 and two for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1832 as a professional given man.[e] He also played matches for the Players of Kent[f] and club cricket as an amateur for West Kent and for the Gentlemen of the Surrey Club. [120][121]
Dean 2* 1789 Dean played twice for Kent sides in 1789 as well as once for West Kent in 1790. He made his other first-class appearance for a Middlesex XI in 1787.[n] Other than a surname no biographical details are known. [123]
John Deedes 5 1822–1828 The brother of William Deedes, John Deedes played in a total of 12 first-class matches, five of which were for Kent. [124]
William Deedes 4 1822–1823 William Deedes played in 24 first-class matches, four of which were for Kent sides. His brother, John Deedes also played for the side and his son, also named William, made a single first-class appearance for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1853. He was President of MCC in 1831 and later a member of the Kent General Committee and a vice-president of the club. [125]
David Denne 2 1823 Both of Denne's first-class matches were for Kent sides. He played club cricket for MCC and the Gentlemen of Kent, Sevenoaks Vine and West Kent. His brother, Thomas Denne played first-class cricket and one of his sons, Lambert Denne, played four times for Kent in the 1860s. [126]
John Dicker 2 1840 One of the early roundarm bowlers, Dicker played twice for Kent and made his other first-class appearance for a Married team in a benefit match. He played club cricket for a variety of west Kent sides. [86][127]
Alban Dorrinton 1 1836 The brother of the much more prolific William Dorrinton, Alban Dorrinton played his only first-class match for Kent in 1836. He played club cricket for Town Malling as an all rounder. [128]
William Dorrinton 55 1836–1848 Dorrinton played in a total of 94 first-class matches, 55 of which were for Kent. After 1844 he was often the wicket-keeper in the dominant Kent XI of the time. He was a member of the Lord's ground staff from 1844 to 1846 after which he played regularly for William Clarke's All-England Eleven, including in the first match the side played. [129][130]
Duke of Dorset 14 1773–1783 As well as raising his own team, John Sackville played 14 of his 23 first-class matches for Kent sides. A major patron of cricket, he employed a number of high-profile cricketers such as William Bowra and John Minshull at his estate at Knole House near Sevenoaks and in 1773 gifted the Sevenoaks Vine ground created by his father Lord John Sackville. [34][73][131][132]
John Dudlow 1841 Dudlow was selected for the Kent side to play against Nottinghamshire at Trent Bridge in 1841 but did not play any part in the match and there is no evidence he was even on the ground during the game, although he was recorded as "absent hurt" on the scorecard. He did not bat in either Kent innings and Frederick Thackeray fielded for him. He played regularly for Town Malling during the 1830s and outside of cricket was a lawyer, serving as the coroner for west Kent for a number of years. [133][134]
Timothy Duke 5 1823–1828 Duke succeeded his father, also Timothy, as the senior partner in Duke & Sons cricket ball manufacturers. He was responsible for significant changes in the ways that balls were produced and in the industrialisation of the process. He played regularly in club cricket for Penshurst and Leigh as a fast bowler and appeared in all five of his first-class matches for Kent sides. His son, John Duke, played in one first-class match for Kent in 1855 and succeeded Timothy as senior partner in the family business. [135]
John Dyke 1 1822 An officer in the Honourable East India Company, Dyke played in one first-class match in 1822. He played occasionally in club cricket, including for the Royal Artillery Cricket Club in the same year. His brothers Percyvall Dyke and Thomas Dyke both also played for Kent. [136]
Percyvall Dyke 8 1823–1828 The eldest of three brothers to play for Kent, Dyke made eight appearances in first-class matches for the county side and played twice for the Gentlemen of Kent. In all he played in 21 first-class matches as well as in other matches for sides such as West Kent and MCC. In 1846 he succeeded his father as the sixth of the Dyke baronets, living at Lullingstone Castle. He was a member of the Kent County Club formed at Maidstone in 1859 and a vice-president of the combined county club from its formation in 1870 until his death in 1875. His son, Sir William Hart Dyke, 7th Baronet, was influential in the development of lawn tennis and was President of MCC in 1880 and of Kent County Cricket Club in 1884. [137][138][139]
Thomas Dyke 1 1827 The brother of John Dyke and Percyvall Dyke, Thomas Dyke played one first-class match for Kent in 1827 and one for MCC in 1824. After graduating from Christ Church, Oxford he became a clergyman in 1826, initially at Lullingstone, site of the family seat, and from 1832 at Long Newton in County Durham where he continued to play club cricket into the 1850s. [140]

E edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
John Evans 4 1822–1823 Played in four first-class matches, all against MCC, scoring 90 not out when opening the batting in his final match in 1823. No biographical details are known, although he probably came from somewhere in west Kent and played club cricket in the Blackheath area until the 1840s. [141]

F edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Frederick Fagge 14* 1834–1851 As well as 14 first-class matches for Kent, Fagge played 23 matches for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1833 and 1853 and one for a combined Kent and Sussex side in 1836 as well as club cricket for a number of sides, including East Kent. He was the third son of the sixth Fagge baronet and was highly regarded as a club all-rounder. [142][143]
Nicholas Felix 52* 1834–1852 Routinely known by his pseudonym of Felix, Nicholas Wanostrocht played in 149 first-class matches, including 52 for Kent both before and after the foundation of the first county club in 1842, and 22 for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1842 and 1852. A schoolmaster and artist of Flemish origin, Felix has been described as a "brilliant left-handed bat" who played with "grace and fluency",[144] and a good lob bowler. He was a member of the dominant Kent side of the 1840s, playing alongside Fuller Pilch and Alfred Mynn. He was the first amateur to receive a benefit match organised by MCC at Lord's, designed the first bowling machine and published Felix On the Bat, an instruction manual which he illustrated with his own sketches. [144][145][146][147][148]
William Fennex 3 1787–1792 Originally from Berkshire or Buckinghamshire, Fennex played in 88 first-class matches, most frequently for England and Middlesex sides and was noted as a good player of single wicket cricket. All three of his matches for Kent were as a given man.[e] [149][150][151][152]
Richard Fielder 11* 1792–1796 As well as Fielder's 11 first-class matches for Kent, he played once for West Kent in 1790. He played in 20 first-class matches in all. [153]
Finch 1 1786 Played a single first-class match against a Hampshire XI in 1786. It is possible that he is the Finch who played for a Kent side against Woolwich Cricket Club in 1800 and it is possible that he is the J Finch who played for Berkshire sides in the 1790s, but other than a surname, no biographical details are certain. [154][155]
Jasper Fish 1 1773 Fish is known to have played a match for the Duke of Dorset's XI at Sevenoaks Vine as early as 1769 and made his only first-class appearance for a Kent side at the same ground in 1773. He played a further match for the county side against Maidstone in 1777 which is not considered first-class. He was buried at Sevenoaks in 1791, but no other biographical information is known and he is identified simply as J Fish by CricInfo. [156][157]
John Frame 1 1773 Described by Arthur Haygarth as one of the "most famous bowler[s] of his day",[150] Frame was born in 1733 and is first known to have played in a single wicket match as early as 1754. He played in only seven matches given first-class status towards the end of his career, including one in 1773 for a Kent side. He died in 1796 aged 63. [106][150][158][159]
Richard Francis 3 1782–1788 Born in Surrey, Francis moved to the Hambledon Club where he played alongside David Harris as a bowler. He later played in Essex and all three of his first-class appearances for Kent were probably as a given man.[e] [160][161][162]
Andrew Freemantle 4* 1790–1793 A Hambledon Club player and the younger brother of John Freemantle, Andrew Freemantle played in 134 first-class matches between 1788 and 1810. All four of his matches for Kent sides were as a given man;[e] he played one first-class match for a combined Hampshire and Kent side in 1794. [111][160][163]
James Fuggles 1 1773 Fuggles is known to have played as early as 1768 and played in four first-class matches. He played in three matches for England against Hampshire sides during 1772, the first year in which matches have been given first-class status, and made his other first-class appearance for Kent the following year, although by this time he was likely declining as a cricketer. Although he is considered "a noted batsman"[164] and is mentioned by name in a poem of 1772, no other biographical details are known and he appears to have played little cricket after 1773. [164][165][166][167]

G edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
C Gardiner 1 1828 Played a single match against a Surrey side in 1828 and it is possible that Gardiner was a Godalming Cricket Club player who played for Kent to make the sides even―other players with the same surname are known to have played for Godalming during the late 1820s.[k] The 1907 History of Kent County Cricket makes reference to a Colonel Gardiner, an MCC member, playing in a match for Kent in 1828, but it is thought unlikely that these are the same man. [88]
Goodhew 3 1791–1795 Made three first-class appearances, all for Kent sides between 1791 and 1795. Is known to have played other matches between 1789 and 1800 but no biographical details other than a surname are known. [168]
N Graham 1 1792 Played in 53 first-class matches between 1787 and 1801, most frequently for Middlesex sides. Made a single appearance for a Kent side in 1792 against an Essex XI. [169]
Green 1 1828 Played in a match against a Surrey side at Godalming in 1828. Other than a surname no biographical details are certain, although the 1907 History of Kent County Cricket states that he was the father of William Green.[o] [170]
William Green 2 1841–1842 Only known to have played in two matches, both first-class for Kent sides just before the first county club was established in 1842. Possibly the son of the Green who played a single match for the side in 1828. Few details are known about this player and he has not been identified as playing in any other matches in Kent. His son, also William Green, played three times for Kent between 1856 and 1861. [171]
Greenstreet 1 1788 Named Greenstreet by most sources, although an alternative spelling of Grinstead was preferred by Arthur Haygath in Scores and Biographies, he is only known to have played in a single match, a first-class match against a Surrey side in 1788 at Bourne Paddock. He is thought to have lived in nearby Wingham, but no other biographical details are known. [172][173]

H edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
John Hammond 4* 1794–1806 From Sussex, Hammond played in a total of 123 first-class matches and is considered to have been one of the best all-rounders of his era. He lived for a time in the 1790s at Dartford and three of his four matches for Kent were played for the side at that time―he also played first-class matches for East Kent and for combined Surrey and Kent and Hampshire and Kent sides at this time. His final match for the county in 1806 was as a given man.[e] [174][175]
Henry Hampton 1 1806 A member of the Montpelier Cricket Club, Hampton played one of his six first-class matches for Kent, playing in 1806 at Bowman's Lodge in Dartford against an England XI. He later ran a cricket ground used by the East Surrey Club at Camberwell where Nicholas Felix first developed his cricket skills. [176]
Thomas Harden 1 1829 Harden played in only one match, an 1829 fixture against a Sussex XI at Brighton. He scored no runs in either of his innings. It is believed that he was christened at Rolvenden in 1805 but other than this no further biographical details are known. [177]
Archibald Harenc 2* 1840 Three of Harenc's brothers played first-class cricket, including Charles Harenc who played for Kent. Archibald served in the British Army and made two of his 12 first-class appearances for Kent sides in 1840. He also played five times for the Gentlemen of Kent in first-class matches between 1842 and 1859 and in three matches for the Gentlemen of Kent and Sussex. [178][179]
Charles Harenc 14* 1834–1848 All four of the Harenc brothers played for Gentlemen of Kent sides. Charles, who was considered the best amateur bowler of his era, did so in 18 first-class matches between 1830 and 1849, as well as making 14 appearances for Kent sides both before and after the first County Club was established at Canterbury in 1842. He also played in one first-class match for a combined Kent and Sussex side in 1836. [180][181]
David Harris 1* 1792 Harris is considered to have been one of the best bowlers of his era and popularised the pitched delivery rather than one rolled along the ground. He played a total of 78 times in first-class matches, with his single appearance for Kent in 1792 against an England XI coming as a given man.[e] He also played for West Kent, East Kent and for a combined Hampshire and Kent side. [182][183][184][185][186]
Isaac Hatch 1 1786 Identified only as I Hatch by CricInfo and CricketArchive,[p] Hatch played in a single match, a 1786 fixture against White Conduit Club. He appears to have been an amateur player but no other biographical details are known. [187][188]
Robert Hills 7 1836–1838 A market gardener from Town Malling, Hills played all seven of his first-class matches for Kent against Sussex. He played for the Town Malling club, at the time the dominant club in Kent and the one that organised the county side, and for Gravesend Cricket Club and Meopham as a bowler. [189][190]
Thomas Hills 1 1840 A noted single wicket cricketer, Hills was known as the "Champion of Kent" but only made one appearance in a match now deemed first-class, scoring a total of six runs. He played regularly in the 1830s for the Town Malling side, the dominant one in Kent at the time. Initially a bowler known for his accuracy, Hills later became a wicket-keeper. [191]
William Hillyer 82* 1835–1853 Hillyer was a bowler in the dominant Kent team of the 1840s, playing 82 first-class matches for the side. He also played twice for the Gentlemen of Kent and twice for a combined Kent and Sussex side, and made 230 first-class appearances in total, taking almost 1,500 wickets. He was a member of the MCC ground staff at Lord's, a founder member of William Clarke's All-England Eleven and was employed as a cricket coach at a number of organisations, most notably by Oxford University Cricket Club. [192][193][194][195]
Hines 1 1822 Played a single match for Kent against MCC at Chislehurst Cricket Club in 1822, opening the batting and scoring a total of 15 runs in the match. It is possible that he was from Greenwich. Other than a name, no biographical details are certain and there is a possibility that his name may be a misspelling of Hills.[q] [196]
Hogben 5 1781–1782 Played five of his six first-class matches for Kent sides, with the other being for Sir Horatio Mann's XI. Has been identified of being from Rochester but otherwise no biographical details are known. [197][198]
William Hollis 1 1841 A wicket-keeper who was a member of the MCC ground staff, Hollis played one of his seven first-class matches for a Kent side in 1841. He played club cricket for sides in Charlton, Deptford and Blackheath in east Kent. [199]
Hooker 1 1795 Played one of his three first-class matches for a Kent side. The other two matches were both played at Dandelion Paddock in Margate, a short-lived ground established by Sir Horatio Mann when he left Bourne Park House. Other than a name, no biographical details are known. [200]
J Hopper 3 1822–1827 A batsman who played three matches for Kent during the 1820s, Hopper was probably a coal merchant in the Leeds area who later became a publican in the village. The 1907 History of Kent County Cricket identifies him as coming from Lenham, although it also provides the first initial G. Biographical details are speculative, although he may have been named John or James. [201]
Richard Hosmer 6* 1782–1788 Hosmer played in 18 first-class matches, including six for Kent, one for the Gentlemen of Kent and two each for East Kent and West Kent as well as playing for Sir Horatio Mann's XI. [202]
Edward Hussey 6 1773–1796 Six of Hussey's 18 first-class matches were for Kent sides. [203]

J edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
James Jardine 1 1827 Born at Dartford in 1794, Jardine played club cricket for MCC, of which he was a member. He lived most of his life in London and was a property developer. He made two appearances in first-class cricket, one of which was for a Kent side against MCC at Lord's in 1827. [204]
Herbert Jenner 6* 1827–1836 One of the most well-regarded amateur cricketers of his generation, Jenner played six times for Kent sides in first-class matches, as well as in six matches for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1830 and 1838 and once for a combined Kent and Sussex side in 1836. Primarily a wicket-keeper, he made 36 first-class appearances in total, played nine times for the Gentlemen against the Players, was President of MCC in 1833 and of the West Kent club from 1884 until his death at the age of 98 in 1904. Professionally a distinguished lawyer, he had stopped playing "serious" cricket by 1838 in order to concentrate on his career.[205] [205][206][207][208]
James Jordan 4 1822–1823 Regarded as one of Kent's best batsmen of the years before the arrival of Fuller Pilch, Jordan played club cricket for Gillingham and made his first-class debut for the Players against the Gentlemen at Lord's in 1822. He played four times for the county side, scoring a century for the county against MCC in 1823, the first scored for a Kent side in a first-class match. It is unclear why he played so infrequently in top-level matches, although it has been suggested that he may have clashed with the amateur gentlemen who organised county games[209] or that he suffered from ill health.[210] [209][210]

K edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Henry Knatchbull 4* 1827–1848 As well as four matches for Kent sides, both before and after the first County Club was established in 1842, Knatchbull played seven times for the Gentlemen of Kent in first-class matches and made 41 first-class appearances in total. He was a clergyman, mainly serving in Norfolk and Suffolk, playing first-class matches for both counties. [211][212]
Edward Knight 4 1822–1828 Four of Knight's 13 first-class matches were played for Kent sides. He came from a cricketing family with a number of members who played first-class cricket. These included his brothers, George Knight and Brook Knight, and son Wyndham William Knight all playing for Kent sides. [213]
George Knight 7* 1827–1828 As well as seven first-class matches for Kent sides, Knight played once for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1832. A roundarm bowler, he was a member of MCC and was influential in arranging a series of matches in 1827 to trial the contentious form of bowling[r] and proposed an amendment to the Laws of Cricket to legalise rounders bowling in 1828. The amendment failed to pass and Knight was often no-balled as a result. He was part of a cricketing family, with brothers Edward and Brook Knight both playing for Kent sides. [214][215]

L edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
William Lambert 1 1806 The dominant professional of the early years of the 19th century, Lambert played one of his 64 first-class matches for Kent in 1806 as a given man.[e] [216][217]
Henry Thomas Lane 2 1823 A West Kent member, Lane played two first-class matches for Kent sides in 1823, both against MCC. He played in a total of nine first-class matches, including twice for the Gentlemen against the Players. [218]
John Leaney 2 1825–1826 Both of Leaney's first-class matches were for Kent sides, in both cases against Sussex sides at the Royal New Ground in Brighton. Both matches were organised by Hawkhurst Cricket Club. He was christened at Hawkhurst in May 1790, but otherwise very little is known about his life, although it is possible that he worked as a tailor in the town. [219]
William Leaney 1 1815 Leaney played his only known cricket match as the wicket-keeper for a Kent XI against an England side in 1815 at Wrotham Napps. He is known to have been born at Hawkhurst and worked as a blacksmith, but little is known about his life. [220]
John Lefeaver 9 1841–1854 The son of Stephen Lefeaver, John Lefeaver farmed near Bethersden. He played nine first-class matches, all for Kent sides, never playing more than single match a season until 1854 when he appeared in four. He played club cricket for Boughton Monchelsea and appeared at least once for West Kent in a match against the East Kent club. At one point Lefeaver was reputed to be the strongest man in Kent. [221]
Stephen Lefeaver 2 1825 Leafeaver farmed at Stile Bridge and played club cricket for Marden as well as for sides such as Benenden, Coxheath, Horsmonden and Leeds. He played both of his first-class matches for Kent sides against Sussex sides in 1825. His son, John Lefeaver, played for Kent between 1841 and 1854. [222]
Richard Leigh 1 1806 The son of Richard Leigh, a significant patron who organised matches often featuring his own teams, Leigh played in a total of six first-class matches, only one of which was for his native Kent. He was the first Secretary of the Society of Royal Kentish Bowmen, organising cricket matches and other events at the society's base at Bowman's Lodge on Dartford Heath. [223]
George Louch 6* 1773–1792 As well as six first-class matches for his native Kent, Louch played once for West Kent and once for a combined Surrey and Kent side. He made a total of 122 appearances in first-class matches, most frequently for MCC. [224]
Luck 3 1793 All three of Luck's first-class matches were for Kent against MCC in 1793. Other than that he came from Strood, nothing is known about his life. [225][226]

M edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Horatio Mann 2 1773 One of the most significant patrons of the last decades of the 18th century, Mann was a member of the Hambledon Club and was a member of the group which revised the Laws of Cricket in 1774. He established his own grounds at Bourne Paddock near Canterbury and at Dandelion Paddock in Margate. Mann only played in two first-class matches, both for Kent sides against Surrey XIs in 1773, but was much more influential as an arranger of matches and employer of cricketers, including James Aylward and Joey Ring. [227][228][229][230]
Will Martingell 49* 1841–1852 Martingell played in a total of 182 first-class matches, including 49 for Kent and one for a combined Surrey and Kent side. He played another 49 matches for Surrey sides, both before and after the formation of Surrey County Cricket Club in 1845, and divided his time between the two county sides, although he almost always played for Surrey when the two sides played each other. Primarily known as a bowler, he played 12 times for the Players against the Gentlemen, was a founding member of William Clarke's All-England Eleven and was on the MCC ground staff at Lord's between 1856 and 1860. He was employed as a coach in a number of organisations, including from 1867 at Eton College. [231][232][233][234]
Stephen Masters 1 1815 Masters played club cricket for Hawkhurst and is believed to have been a shoemaker who was married in 1816 at Lamberhurst, although little is known for certain about his life. His only first-class match was for Kent against an England XI at Wrotham Napps in 1815. [235]
Richard May 5 1773–1779 Five of May's 13 first-class matches were for Kent sides. His brother, Thomas May also played for Kent during the same period. [236]
Thomas May 2 1773 Thomas May played in five first-class matches, all in 1772 and 1773. These included two matches for Kent sides. His brother Richard May also played for Kent. Little is known about the life of either brother and it is difficult at times to tell which played in specific matches. [237][238]
William May 1 1834 May played club cricket for sides in the Leeds and Maidstone area. His only first-class match was for a Kent side in 1834. [239]
John Mayers 1 1827 Mayers is wrongly identified as "Naires" in a variety of sources, including in Scores and Biographies and in the 1907 History of Kent County Cricket. He was born at Benenden in 1801 and died at Hawkhurst in 1865, but nothing is known for certain about his life. His only first-class match was against a Sussex XI at Sevenoaks Vine in 1827. [240]
Henry Mayne 2* 1835–1844 A regular player in a variety of high-profile amateur sides, Mayne played two first-class matches for Kent, one in 1835 and one in 1844. He also played four times for the Gentlemen of Kent [241]
Joseph Miller[s] 19* 1773–1783 As well as 19 matches for Kent, Miller played two first-class matches for East Kent and three for Sir Horatio Mann's XI. He was employed by John Sackville, 3rd Duke of Dorset at Knole Park. [34][73][242][243]
Charles Mills 1 1840 Mills played club cricket at Benenden and is believed to be related to George Mills and Richard Mills. He made his only first-class appearance for a Kent side in 1840. Nothing is known of his life after the 1841 census. [244]
George Mills 8 1825–1829 The brother of Richard Mills, George Mills is believed to have played in nine first-class matches, eight of which were for Kent sides. It is possible, however, that there were two cricketers of the same name, believed to be cousins, playing in the Benenden and Hawkhurst area and the precise identity of the men who played in individual matches is unclear. Both may have played for Kent sides.[t] [245]
Richard Mills 29* 1825–1843 Described as an aggressive left-handed batsman, Mills was the brother of George Mills. He played in a total of 45 first-class matches, including 29 for Kent sides, two for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1832 and one for a combined Kent and Sussex side in 1836. In club cricket he played regularly for Benenden and farmed nearby. [246][247][248]
John Minshull 1 1773 Minshull, who was also known as Minchin, scored the first recorded century in any form of cricket, making 107 runs playing for the Duke of Dorset's XI in 1769 at Sevenoaks Vine.[u] He is known to have been employed by Dorset as a gardener between 1769 and 1772 at his Knole Park estate, and played in matches in the years before they have been awarded first-class status. His only first-class appearance for Kent was as a given man[e] against a Surrey XI at the Vine in 1773 after he had left Knole for Uxbridge. [34][73][249][250][251][252]
George Monson 1 1792 The second son of John Monson, 2nd Baron Monson, Monson played one of his 10 first-class matches for Kent in 1792. [253]
Alfred Mynn 90* 1834–1859 One of the most well-known cricketers in the country and a member of the dominant Kent team of the 1840s, Mynn was a roundarm bowler who played in 213 first-class matches, taking over 1,000 wickets. He played 90 times in first-class matches for Kent between 1834 and 1859, 29 times for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1832 and 1852, twice for combined Kent and Sussex sides in 1836 and 1853, and twice for the Gentlemen of Kent and Surrey in 1855. He was a founding member of William Clarke's All-England Eleven and sat on the management committee of the Kent County Club founded at Maidstone in 1859. His brother, Walter Mynn, also played for Kent. [254][255][256][257][258]
Walter Mynn 45* 1835–1848 The older brother of Alfred Mynn, Walter Mynn played in 90 first-class matches, primarily as a defensive-minded opening batsman. As well as 45 appearances for Kent sides, he played 18 times for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1842 and 1852. He was considered one of the best long stop fielders of his era. [259][260][261]

N edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Richard Newman 3 1773–1786 Newman played in 19 first-class matches, including three for Kent sides. He was born Richard Newman Harding and was a part-owner of a slave plantation in Hanover, Jamaica. He changed his name to Richard Newman Harding Newman on inheriting property in Essex from his grandfather and played non-first-class matches for teams in Essex. [262][263]
Nicholson 1 1788 Played a single match, a 1788 fixture for Kent against an England side on Coxheath Common. Other than a surname, no biographical details are known. [264]
John Noakes 2 1826 Noakes played twice for Kent in 1826, his only known cricket. He batted towards the top of the order in both matches and scored a total of 19 runs, with a highest score of 11. His identity is in some doubt and it is uncertain if his forename is correct. The 1907 History of Kent County Cricket states that he was from Woolwich, but other sources give no forename or initial. [265]
Thomas Nordish 2 1815–1823 Nordish played both of his first-class matches for Kent sides, opening the batting and scoring a total of 17 runs. He played other matches for Kent sides and club cricket for Meopham and other local sides. [266]
George Warde Norman 3* 1834–1836 The brother of Henry Norman, George Warde Norman played three times for Kent sides between 1834 and 1836 and six times in first-class matches for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1832 and 1838. A Director of the Bank of England, Norman was an influential writer on financial issues. His son, Frederick Norman, and grandson, Maurice Bonham-Carter, both played for Kent. [267][268][269]
Henry Norman 5* 1827–1835 Henry Norman played in 14 first-class matches, including five for Kent sides between 1827 and 1835, and four for the Gentlemen of Kent, twice in each of 1832 and 1833. His brother George Warde Norman also played for Kent during the 1830s and both brothers were involved with the West Kent Club, Henry Norman serving as Treasurer for a time. [270][271]
John Nyren 1 1787 Much better known as an author, Nyren played one of his 16 first-class matches for a Kent side. [272][273][274]

O edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Henry Ommaney 1 1828 A member of the British Army, Ommaney played in a single first-class match, opening the batting for Kent against MCC at Lord's in 1828. He scored 44 runs, 20 in Kent's first innings and 24 not out in the second. He was commissioned in the Royal Artillery in 1825 and died in 1829 whilst serving in Jamaica. [275]
Cyril Onslow 1 1841 Onslow played club cricket for Penshurst and Tunbridge Wells Cricket Clubs and made his only first-class appearance for a Kent side in 1841, scoring four runs without being dismissed in his only innings. [276]

P edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Palmer 4* 1789 As well as four appearances for Kent, Palmer played twice for West Kent and once for an England XIII,[v] all in 1789. He scored a total of 89 runs in his 14 innings, with a highest score of 43 not out made on his debut for Kent against a Surrey XI. Other than a surname, no biographical details are known. [278]
William Palmer 1 1776 A Surrey cricketer, Palmer played a single match for Kent as a given man[e] against a Hampshire side in 1776. [279][280]
Henry Parker 1* 1841 As well as making one of his 17 first-class appearances for a Kent side in 1841, Parker played eight times for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1842 and 1854. The son of a clergyman, Parker also served in the Church of England at a number of locations around Kent and played club cricket for sides across the county. [281][282]
Thomas Pattenden 20* 1773–1783 The brother of William Pattenden, Thomas Pattenden played 20 first-class matches for Kent and one for each of East Kent and West Kent. There are some doubts about which of the brothers played in some matches. [283]
William Pattenden 1* 1786 As well as playing once for Kent in 1786, Pattenden, who was the brother of Thomas Pattenden, played twice for East Kent as well as playing for Sir Horatio Mann's XI and the Duke of Dorset's team. He made a total of five first-class appearances. [284]
Fuller Pilch 84* 1836–1854 One of the leading cricketers of his day, Pilch moved from his native Norfolk to Town Malling in 1835 when there was an attempt to establish a county club in the town. He played 84 first-class matches for Kent sides between 1836 and 1854, once for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1837 and once for a combined Kent and Sussex side in 1853; in all he played in 229 first-class fixtures. Considered the best batsman in the country until the emergence of WG Grace in the 1870s, Pilch moved to Canterbury in 1842 when the first Kent county club was established there, managing first the Beverley Ground and then, from 1847, the St Lawrence Ground. After playing his final top-level match in 1854, during Canterbury Cricket Week, he umpired regularly at Canterbury until 1866. After he died in 1870 a memorial was erected to his memory at St George's Church in Canterbury; it was moved to the St Lawrence Ground in 1978. [285][286][287][288][289][290]
William Pilch 44* 1840–1854 The nephew of Fuller Pilch, William Pilch played 44 times for Kent sides between 1840 and 1854 as well as once for a combined Kent and Sussex side in 1857. He made his Kent debut as a replacement for Ned Wenman after he was injured during a match.[w] He did not play again for the side until 1845, after the establishment of the first Kent County Cricket Club, having moved to live with his uncle. Pilch played in a total of 52 first-class matches, including twice appearing for the Players against the Gentlemen. [291][292]
John Pilcher 17* 1787–1796 As well as 17 first-class matches for Kent sides, Pilcher played three times for East Kent and once for a combined Hampshire and Kent side. He made a total of 31 first-class appearances between 1787 and 1796. [293]
Uriah Pillion 1 1828 Played a single first-class match for Kent in 1828. Pillion probably came from Sevenoaks and is believed to have played club cricket in west Kent, but biographical details are scarce. [294]
Charles Prickett 2 1826 Both of Prickett's first-class matches were for Kent against Sussex sides in 1826. Both matches were organised by the Hawkhurst club and Prickett probably played for that club and ran a public house at Goudhurst, although biographical details are uncertain―in the 1907 History of Kent County Cricket and some other sources he is named Pritchard. [295]
Purcell 1 1829 Listed in the 1907 History of Kent County Cricket as coming from Bromley, Purcell played one match for Kent against a Sussex side in 1829 scoring a total of 2 runs. There are no other biographical details. [296]
Richard Purchase 2* 1793 A member of the Hambledon Club, both of Purchase's matches for Kent sides and all three for East Kent were as a given man.[e] He made a total of 114 appearances in first-class matches between 1773 and 1803. [297][298]

R edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Thomas Razell 1 1815 Razell, or Razzell, probably played club cricket at Penenden Heath and played matches for East Kent between 1804 and 1806. He played non-first-class matches for Kent sides before playing his only first-class match for the team in 1815 at Wrotham Napps. Few biographical details are certain, although he may have been a publican at Saltwood; CricketArchive gives a birth date of 1787 and lists him as dying at Dorking in Surrey in 1851, although the surname is common around Dorking at the time and these are uncertain. He made a total of three first-class appearances between 1809 and 1816, including one for Epsom in Surrey in 1816. [299][300]
Reid 1 1828 Possibly from Sevenoaks, little is known about Reid. His one first-class match came for Kent in 1828 and he may have played club cricket at Sevenoaks Vine. [301]
Benjamin Remington 5* 1779–1781 As well as five first-class matches for Kent sides, Remington played two for East Kent as well as three for sides organised by Sir Horatio Mann. He made a total of 13 appearances in first-class cricket. His brothers, Michael and Thomas Remington also played for Kent and at times there are some doubts over which brother played in specific matches. [302][303]
Michael Remington 1* 1781 Brother of Thomas and Benjamin Remington, Michael Remington played in seven first-class matches, one of which was for a Kent side and one of which was for East Kent. The family name has sometimes been spelled "Rimmington". [303][304]
Thomas Remington 1 1781 Thomas Remington played in the fewest first-class matches of the three brothers, all of whom were born at Boughton Monchelsea. He made one of his four appearances for a Kent side, with another coming in a match organised by Sir Horatio Mann at Bourne Paddock. [303][305]
Joey Ring 33* 1782–1796 Employed by Sir Horatio Mann, first at Bourne Park House and then at Margate, Ring played 33 first-class matches for Kent sides, four for East Kent and one each for combined Hampshire and Kent and Surrey and Kent sides. Ring is considered to have been Kent's best batsman of the era and played in a total of 89 first-class matches. He may have died as a result of a ball bowled by his brother George Ring hitting his nose and causing an infection. [8][306][307]
Robert Robinson 1* 1795 Played once for Kent as a given man,[e] and three times for combined Surrey and Kent sides. In total Robinson played in 111 first-class matches, most frequently for Surrey sides. [308][309]
Charles Rocke 2 1828 The identity of Rocke is in significant doubt and there are a number of possibilities for the two appearances that a player named Rocke made for the side in 1828. It may have been the Charles Rocke who attended Eton College and played for MCC, but may have been a local man. [310]
Batchelor Roper 1 1835 One of Roper's two first-class matches were played for a Kent side against MCC at Lord's in 1835. There are some doubts about the precise identity of this player. [311]

S edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
James Saunders 2 1827 Saunders played in 54 first-class matches. Both of his appearances for Kent sides were as a given man.[e] [312]
William Searle 3 1827–1829 All three of Searle's first-class matches for Kent were as a given man.[e] He played a total of 48 first-class matches, including appearing in 10 matches for the Players against the Gentlemen. [313]
Thomas Selby 3 1839–1841 Selby played club cricket for Sevenoaks Vine and then established what was to become the Town Malling club. He was influential in the attempt to set up a County Club in the town during the 1830s and was largely responsible for persuading Fuller Pilch to move from Norfolk. Selby only played in three first-class matches, all for Kent sides; he scored a total of 19 runs in his six innings, with a highest score of 17. He is alluded to in The Pickwick Papers which described a cricket match probably based on a game at Town Malling. [9][314]
Richard Simmons 6 1773–1775 Simmons played in a total of 13 first-class matches, six of which were for Kent sides. From 1778 until 1779 he played for Surrey sides. [315]
Edward Sivewright 1 1828 Sivewright played in two first-class matches in 1828: the first in August for Kent against a Surrey side and the second for Surrey against Kent in September. He does not appear to have had any connection with Kent and played in the 1829 University Match for Cambridge despite not being admitted as a student at Downing College until 1842. [316]
Small 1 1788 Small is only known to have played in a single match, a fixture against an England side on Coxheath Common in 1788. He scored a single run in each innings he batted in. It has been suggested that this is Eli Small, the brother of Jack Small, but there is no evidence to support this speculation. [317][318]
Jack Small 1* 1795 One of the most prolific batsmen of the time, Small played one match for Kent and once for East Kent, both times as a given man,[e] and once for a combined Hampshire and Kent side. Born in 1765, Small was a shoe maker who later became a maker of cricket bats and balls who played in a total of 144 first-class matches in a career which lasted from 1784 until 1810. His father, John Small, was one of the dominant players of the 1760s and 70s and played first-class matches for East Kent and combined Hampshire and Kent sides. [319][320][321][322][323]
James Smith 4 1792–1793 Smith played four times for Kent sides in 1792 and 1793 and once for sides organised by each of Richard Leigh and the Earl of Winchilsea, both of whom were associated with cricket in the county. He played club cricket until at least 1800, including for the prominent Rochester club, and probably played in a final first-class match for an England side at Lord's Old Ground in 1800. In his seven first-class matches he scored a total of 84 runs, with a highest score of 30. Other than his name, no biographical details are known. [324][325]
William Smith 7 1840–1857 Smith came from Gravesend and had a shared financial interest in the Bat and Ball Ground in the town with Tom Adama. He played club cricket in Gravesend and all seven of his first-class matches were for Kent sides between 1840 and 1857. Smith spent some time in South Australia during the 1850s and is known to have played cricket there. [326][327]
Stephen Southon 4 1825–1826 Southon played four first-class matches, all for Kent sides against Sussex sides. Biographical details are uncertain, but it is likely he was from the Benenden area and played for club cricket for Hawkhurst. If so, he migrated to the United States where he died, at Albany, New York in 1880. [328]
John Sparks 2 1822 A well-known cricketer who played most frequently in his 50 first-class matches for Surrey sides. He played twice for Kent sides in 1822 against MCC, where he was a member of the ground staff. [329]
Richard Stanford 3* 1786–1787 Stanford played three first-class matches for Kent sides as well as once for both East Kent and West Kent, two for sides organised by the Duke of Dorset and one for an England XI, all between 1780 and 1787. He was christened at East Peckham in 1754 and died in the same village in 1792 aged 38. [330][331]
William Stearman 11 1836–1840 Stearman made 11 of his 15 first-class appearances for Kent sides. He was born in Norfolk and is believed to have moved to Kent with Fuller Pilch in around 1835. He returned to Norfolk in 1843 and played for the county until his death in 1846. [332]
Lumpy Stevens 12* 1774–1782 One of the leading bowlers of the era, all 12 of Lumpy's matches for Kent were against Hampshire sides as a given man.[e] He also played twice for West Kent against East Kent, again as a given man. He was employed by Charles Bennet, 4th Earl of Tankerville at his Walton-on-Thames estate and played regularly for Surrey and England sides, making a total of 83 appearances in first-class matches. [333][334][335]
Robert Stone 1 1790 One of Stone's 10 first-class matches was for a Kent side in 1790, although he also played for Sir Horatio Mann's XI. [336]
Lord Strathavon 2 1827–1836 Strathavon, who became the sixth Earl of Aboyne in 1836, played twice for Kent sides, once in each of 1827 and 1836, and four times for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1832 and 1838. In all he played in 33 first-class matches, although he is considered to have been a poor cricketer. [337][338]

T edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
G Talbot 2 1789 Although CricInfo and CricketArchive identify Talbot only by initial, he is almost certainly Sir George Talbot, 3rd Baronet. He played two of his 20 first-class matches for Kent sides. [339][340]
Charles Templeton 1 1829 One of Templeton's three first-class matches was played for Kent. He played in the first University Match for Cambridge in 1827 but died in 1834 at the age of 27. CricInfo identifies him as Chauncey Hare Templeton. [341][342]
Richard Thomas 1* 1835 Thomas was a landowner who owned Eyhorne House at Hollingbourne and played club cricket for Leeds. He played in five first-class matches, including once for Kent in 1835 and once for the Gentlemen of Kent in 1833, scoring a total of 28 runs with a highest score of nine not out. [343][344]
Edward Thwaites 4 1825–1826 A member of the Hawkhurst club, Thwaites played all four of his Kent matches against Sussex sides. He had moved to Sussex by 1826 and qualified to play for that side, first doing so in the same year he played for Kent against Sussex. He later played six times for Sussex against Kent and 19 of his 25 first-class matches were for that county. He also played once for the Players against the Gentlemen. [345][346]
Charles Town 3 1815–1823 A grocer, Charles Town played in three first-class matches, all for Kent. He made his debut against an England side in 1815 at Wrotham Napps and later played twice in 1823 against MCC, once at Lord's and once at Chislehurst Common. He scored a total of 157 runs, including scores of 51, 45 and 47 in 1823, but did not play again in first-class cricket. He appeared to have occasionally used the name Crepin in place of Town and was probably married under that name before remarrying using his birth name. [347]
Townsend 2* 1786 Townsend played in five first-class matches, including two for Kent and one for West Kent. Other than a name, no biographical details are known. [348]
Chauncy Hare Townshend[x] 1 1827 A well known poet and friend of Charles Dickens, Townshend played his only first-class match in 1827, probably as a late replacement for one of three missing amateurs from the Kent side. This is the only cricket match he is known to have played in; he scored two runs. Notably Dickens dedicated his novel Great Expectations to Townshend. [349][350][351]
Henry Tufton 3* 1794–1796 The brother of John Tufton, Henry Tufton played three first-class matches for Kent sides as well as three times for combined Surrey and Kent sides, all between 1794 and 1796. He made a total of 62 appearances in first-class matches, most frequently for MCC sides, and played eight times for Surrey sides. He succeeded as the 11th Earl of Thanet in 1832. [352]
John Tufton 2* 1796 Tufton played twice for Kent in 1796 and once for a combined Surrey and Kent side in the same year. He was the brother of Henry Tufton, 11th Earl of Thanet and made a total of 48 appearances in first-class matches, most frequently for MCC sides, [353]
Thomas Turney 1 1828 A respected club cricketer, Turney, who worked as a carpenter, played for Westerham, Sevenoaks and for the West Kent Club when required. He was a successful batsman at club level, but did not have success when playing for Kent sides, including in his only first-class match, an 1828 fixture against a Surrey side in which he scored seven runs. [86][354]

U edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
John Unstead 1 1825 A wheelwright from Waldron just across the Sussex border, Unstead played club cricket for his village and for nearby Hawkhurst. He played his only first-class match for Kent against a Sussex side in 1825. [355]
William Usmar 1 1841 A successful batsman for Town Malling, Usmar did not score a run in either innings in his only first-class match. [356]

V edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Richard Aubrey Veck 1* 1779 A Hampshire player, Veck played in one first-class match for Kent against a Surrey side in 1779 and once for East Kent against West Kent in 1781. In both matches he played as a given man.[e] Veck has been described as a "highly talented cricketer",[111] but only played top-level matches for nine seasons. [111][357][358]

W edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
Walker 1 1822 In his only known cricket match, Walker opened the Kent innings, scoring a total of 12 runs in his two innings. Other than a name, there are no biographical details known about him. [356]
Tom Walker 2* 1792 Walker, who was considered to be a defensive batsman, played twice for Kent in 1792, both times as a given man[e] against Hampshire sides. He also appeared twice for West Kent as well as playing in combined Hampshire and Kent and Surrey and Kent sides. He played in a total of 176 first-class matches. [359][360][361][362]
Waller 2 1774 Waller played in two first-class matches, both against Hampshire sides in August 1774. He came from Maidstone and is known to have played other matches for the town side. Other than this, no biographical details are known. [363][364]
William Walton 1* 1828 William Walton played in two first-class matches, one for Kent against a Surrey side in 1828 and one for the Gentlemen of Kent against MCC in 1833. He was a lawyer who served as Queen's Remembrancer and Master of the Exchequer of Pleas and was Secretary to the Lord Chancellor. He was knighted in 1875. [365][366]
John Ward 1 1806 One of Ward's 14 first-class matches was for Kent. He played nine times for England XIs and as well as being considered one of the leading bowlers of his time, scored a century for Rochester against MCC at Lord's in 1800. He was from Woolwich and probably played club cricket for Woolwich and Dartford Cricket Clubs. [367]
Webb 3 1781 Webb played five times in first-class matches, three times for Kent in 1781 and once for both West Kent and a side organised by Sir Horatio Mann, both in the same year. He is identified as coming from the Isle of Thanet but is not known to have played any other cricket and no biographical details are known. [368][369]
James Wells 1 1793 The brother of John Wells, James Wells played in 21 first-class matches, including one for Kent against MCC in 1793, possibly as a given man.[e] [370]
John Wells 1* 1792 John Wells played in 149 first-class matches. He played primarily for Surrey sides but made one appearance for Kent as a given man[e] as well as playing twice for West Kent, both as a given man, and once for a combined Surrey and Kent side. His brother, James Wells, also played once for Kent. Wells was considered one of the best all-round players of his time. [371][372]
Charles Wenman 1 1828 The half-brother of Ned Wenman, Charles Wenman probably played cricket for Benenden where he was born. He played in only one first-class match, an 1828 fixture for Kent against a Sussex side. [373]
Ned Wenman 61* 1825–1854 Ned Wenman was a major force in the Kent side which dominated English cricket in the 1840s. He often played as a wicket-keeper, at which he was considered one of the best of his era, and captained the side regularly, with his leadership considered a major factor in Kent's success. He played in a total of 146 first-class matches, 61 of which were for Kent sides. He appeared three times for the Gentlemen of Kent and twice for a combined Kent and Sussex side. Four members of the extended Wenman family played matches for Kent sides before the establishment of the first County Club in 1842, and Ned's son, William Wenman, played 11 times for the County Club during the 1860s. [374][375][376][377][378]
George Wenman 5 1825–1834 Like all of the Wenman family, George Wenman played village cricket for his native Benenden. He was a cousin of Ned Wenman and brother of John Wenman. He played in a total of nine first-class matches, five of which were for Kent sides. [379]
John Wenman 5 1825–1837 The brother of George Wenman, John Wenman played five of his nine first-class matches for Kent sides. He played club cricket for Benenden and is known to have played single wicket cricket in prominent matches. [380]
John Wheeler 1 1773 Wheeler's only first-class match was for a Kent side against one from Surrey in 1773. He is known to have played for a London side in 1775, but other than his name there are no biographical details known. [381]
Thomas Whitby 2 1837 A bowler for the Town Malling club, Whitby played both of his first-class matches for Kent sides in 1837 without taking a wicket.[y] [382]
White 1 1790 White played one first-class match for Kent and two for Hampshire sides. It has been assumed that the players are the same man, and White is believed to be from Andover in Hampshire and to have played as a given man[e] as a replacement for a missing Kent player. [383][384][385]
Thomas White 8 1774–1776 A Surrey player, all eight of White's appearances for Kent were as a given man.[e] He played in 33 first-class matches and is perhaps best known for using an over-wide bat in a match in 1771. [386][387][388]
Charles Whittaker 36* 1839–1847 A farmer and landowner from Barming near Maidstone, Whittaker played 36 of his 70 first-class matches for Kent sides. He played another 12 matches for the Gentlemen of Kent between 1842 and 1848 and appeared for sides such as MCC. He played club cricket for Town Malling and for The Mote. [389]
John Willes 3 1806–1822 Willes is often credited with the invention of roundarm bowling, although the style had certainly been used for many years before he was famously no balled for bowling roundarm against MCC at Lord's in 1822. He played a total of five first-class matches, including three for Kent sides. A landowner, he employed William Ashby, a leading roundarm bowler, on his estate at Sutton Valence. [390][391]
William Willes 1 1815 There are significant doubts over the identity of the Willes who played alongside John Willes for Kent against an England side at Wrotham Napps in 1815. Both CricInfo and CricketArchive identify a G Willes, but the 1907 History of Kent County Cricket identifies William Willes, John Willes' brother, as the player in question. It may be that William is also the same Willes who played in two other non-first-class matches for Kent sides in 1807. Willes scored a single run in his only first-class match. William Willes was christened at Maidstone in January 1777 and died at the family estate at Sutton Valence in 1832. [392][393][394]
Earl of Winchilsea 2* 1792–1794 An influential figure in the White Conduit Club and in the formation of MCC, Winchilsea played two matches for Kent as well as playing once for East Kent in 1790. He made a total of 128 first-class matches and was a prominent match organiser. [395][396][397]
Edward Winter 2 1806–1815 Winter probably played six first-class matches for Oldfield at Bray in the 1790s before playing twice for Kent, once in 1806 and once in 1815. He appeared in a total of 12 first-class matches and probably played club cricket for Dartford Cricket Club. [398]
Wood 2 1828–1829 No biographical details are certain for Wood. He played in two matches for Kent and may have been from Penshurst.[k] [399]
John Wood 7* 1773–1776 John Wood played in 12 first-class matches between 1773 and 1783, including seven for Kent sides and one for West Kent in 1781. He was a bowler who lived at Seal. [400][401]

Y edit

Name Matches Seasons Notes Ref
William Yalden 5 1776–1783 A Surrey player from Chertsey, all five of Yalden's appearances for Kent sides were as a given man.[e] He was a wicket-keeper who ran the Laleham Burway ground and kept a public house associated with it. [402][403]

See also edit

Notes edit

  1. ^ The number of first-class matches played for Kent sides in total, including after the formation of the first Kent County Club in 1842. A * indicates that the player appeared for other Kent sides such as the Gentlemen of Kent or the East and West Kent cricket teams.
  2. ^ The range of seasons during which the player appeared for Kent sides in first-class matches.
  1. ^ More complete scorecards for cricket matches only reliably exist from 1772 and this is considered the date from which matches can be classified as first-class.
  2. ^ The history of Kent County Cricket Club is complicated. In 1859 a second County Club was founded at Maidstone. The two clubs merged in 1870 to form the present-day Kent County Cricket Club.[10]
  3. ^ Kent teams played five first-class matches during 1842, four before the new County Club played its first match. One man, Edward Banks, made his Kent debut in the match at Bromley. He has not been included in this list.[11]
  4. ^ a b An odds match is one in which one side has more players than the other, the aim being to even the chances of victory to an extent.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa A given man was a player who would not usually play for a side and was generally not qualified by either birth or residence to do so. They were either recruited to play for it or "given" by the opposition, to produce a more balanced contest and, in some cases, to attract a bigger crowd.[34]
  6. ^ a b c Players were professional cricketers who were paid to play, as opposed to amateurs who were usually gentlemen who played for sport.[47]
  7. ^ Both CricInfo and CricketArchive list Bayton simply as J Bayton and there are some doubts about his actual name.
  8. ^ Both CricInfo and CricketArchive give Boorman the name James. Arthur Haygarth believed he was named John.
  9. ^ A W Bowning also played in these matches, although this is not known to be William.
  10. ^ Both CricInfo and CricketArchive identify Burgess simply as J Burgess.
  11. ^ a b c Four Kent players from this match cannot be identified, and it is likely that Caesar, Gardiner and Wood at least were all Godalming locals who filled in for Kent.[88]
  12. ^ The Bat and Ball Ground at Gravesend was established in around 1848 by Tom Adams, probably on the site of a private ground which had been created for the use of Lawrence Ruck, a Gravesend grocer who had built the nearby Ruckland House. This is likely to be the same ground.[99][100]
  13. ^ This may be speculation on the part of F. S. Ashley-Cooper writing in his Register of Kent County Cricketers, 1729–1906.
  14. ^ It has been assumed this is the same Dean who played for Middlesex in 1787.[122]
  15. ^ The 1907 History of Kent County Cricket, which was written by Lord Harris, suggests that Green also played a matches in 1841 and 1842, although this is presumably a confusion with William Green who played in those years. William Green was born in 1817 so would have been 11 at the time of the 1828 match that Green played in and so is not the same player.[170]
  16. ^ It is possible that Hatch's forename is speculation.
  17. ^ Several players called Hills played cricket at around the same time.[196]
  18. ^ Roundarm bowling, where the arm is raised to the level of the shoulder, was not officially allowed until 1835, although a number of bowlers pushed the Laws of cricket to their limits and were often no-balled as a result.[214]
  19. ^ Miller's identity is the subject of some doubt. Both CricInfo and CricketArchive identify him as Richard Miller, but this appears to be incorrect.
  20. ^ See Carlaw, pp. 386–388 for details.
  21. ^ Although Minshull's century is the first to be known to have been scored, it is considered likely that John Small had scored one the previous year.[249]
  22. ^ In general, matches with more than 12 players on one side have not been given first-class status, although exceptions have been made. The match Palmer playerd in for England was an "odds match" against a team of 11 players from Hamphire. This makes the award of first-class status for the match all the more unusual.[277]
  23. ^ Wenman, a wicket-keeper, was hit in the mouth by the ball. He had not batted, so Pilch, who was probably not qualified to play for the county by residence, was allowed to play in his place.[291]
  24. ^ Townshend's names are spelled in a variety of ways in different sources. He added an h to his name, which was originally Townsend, in 1835 and his forename is sometimes spelled with an e included.
  25. ^ At the time, wickets which were not out bowled were generally not credited to the bowler on scorecards.

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