Regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes

The regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (French: conseil régional d'Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes) is the deliberative assembly of the region of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Laurent Wauquiez of The Republicans (LR) is the current president of the regional council, elected on 4 January 2016, following the regional elections on 6 and 13 December 2015.

Regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes

Conseil régional d'Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Coat of arms of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Coat of arms of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Logo of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Logo of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Type
Type
History
Preceded byRegional council of Auvergne
Regional council of Rhône-Alpes
New session started
4 January 2016
Leadership
President
Laurent Wauquiez, LR
since 4 January 2016
Structure
Seats204
Current composition of the regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes
Political groups
Majority (113)
  •      The Republicans, Miscellaneous Right and Civil Society (82)
  •      The Democrats (31)

Opposition (91)

  •      National Front (31)
  •      Socialists, Democrats (31)
  •      Citizens, Ecologists, Solidarity Rally (9)
  •      The Human First – PCF – Left Front (7)
  •      La Région En Marche (5)
  •      Radical Party of the Left (5)
  •      Non-Inscrits (3)
Elections
Two-round list proportional representation system with majority bonus
Last election
6 and 13 December 2015
Next election
2021
Meeting place
Seat of the regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes in Lyon
1 esplanade François Mitterrand
CS 20033 – 69269 Lyon cedex 02
Seat of the regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes in Clermont-Ferrand
59 boulevard Léon Jouhaux
CS 90706 – 63050 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 2
Website
www.auvergnerhonealpes.fr

HistoryEdit

The regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes was created by the act on the delimitation of regions, regional and departmental elections and amending the electoral calendar of 16 January 2015, which went into effect on 1 January 2016 and merged the regional councils of Auvergne and Rhône-Alpes,[1] consisting of 47 and 156 regional councillors, respectively, into a single body with 204 regional councillors, following regional elections on 6 and 13 December 2015.[2][3]

SeatEdit

As Lyon was designated as the capital of the new region,[4] the official meeting place of the regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes is at the Hôtel de Région located in the district of La Confluence in the 2nd arrondissement of Lyon at 1 esplanade François Mitterrand.[5][6] Originally built at a cost of €147.1 million as the seat of the regional council of Rhône-Alpes, the construction of the building was approved by the regional council on 7 April 2005, followed by a European-level architecture competition from November 2005 to September 2006, the procurement of a building permit on 30 August 2007, groundbreaking on 8 July 2008, and the relocation of employees over a six-week period starting on 19 May 2011.[7]

On 21 June 2014, the new headquarters of the regional council of Auvergne at the Hôtel de Région in Clermont-Ferrand at 59 boulevard Léon Jouhaux was officially opened, built at a cost of €81 million. The fate of the project,[6][8] approved in 2007 with unanimous support,[9] was questioned given the selection of Lyon as the capital of the new region. Although Jean-Jack Queyranne, president of the regional council of Rhône-Alpes, suggested that the merged region could alternate between the two seats, with plenary assemblies in Lyon and standing committees in Clermont-Ferrand, the idea was scrapped given the comparison to the experience of the European Parliament with its two seats in Brussels and Strasbourg.[5] With Laurent Wauquiez, promising reduced costs, elected president of the region following the 2015 regional elections, any arrangement involving frequent travel between the two cities was definitively ruled out.[5] The building continues to house administrative functionaries,[10] with space rented out for associations and start-ups and serving as a venue for events and conferences in an effort to make the structure profitable.[11] The standing committee of the regional council also occasionally meets in Clermont-Ferrand.[12][13]

Election resultsEdit

2015 regional electionEdit

The current regional council was elected in regional elections on 6 and 13 December 2015, with the list of Laurent Wauquiez consisting of The Republicans (LR), the Democratic Movement (MoDem), and the Union of Democrats and Independents (UDI) securing an absolute majority of 113 seats.[14][15]

Leader List First round Second round Seats
Votes % Votes % Seats %
Laurent Wauquiez LRMoDemUDI 795,661 31.73 1,201,597 40.62 113 55.39
Christophe Boudot FN 639,923 25.52 667,102 22.55 34 16.67
Jean-Jack Queyranne PSPRG 600,112 23.93 1,089,756 36.84 57 27.94
Jean-Charles Kohlhaas EELVPGND 173,038 6.90
Cécile Cukierman PCF 135,274 5.39
Gerbert Rambaud DLF 71,538 2.85
Éric Lafond NC 39,187 1.56
Chantal Gomez LO 31,359 1.25
Alain Fédèle UPR 21,723 0.87
Total 2,507,815 100.00 2,958,455 100.00 204 100.00
Valid votes 2,507,815 96.55 2,958,455 96.58
Blank votes 59,333 2.28 59,166 1.93
Null votes 30,175 1.16 45,577 1.49
Turnout 2,597,323 48.91 3,063,198 57.68
Abstentions 2,713,316 51.09 2,247,266 42.32
Registered voters 5,310,639 5,310,464
Source: Ministry of the Interior, Le Monde (parties), Le Dauphiné Libéré (merged lists)

CompositionEdit

Political groupsEdit

The regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes currently consists of eight political groups. In November 2016, Olga Givernet, Guillaume Gibouin, Marjolaine Meynier-Millefert, Olivier Véran, and Françoise Casalino left the Socialists, Democrats, Ecologists and Related group to form the La Région En Marche group, presided over by Givernet, with the prior group subsequently renamed as the Socialist and Democrat group following the departure of the five. At the same time, the Centre and Independents group and Union of Democrats and Independents group merged to form a single group, The Democrats, initially presided over by Romain Champel,[16][17][18][19] but later co-chaired alongside Patrick Mignola.[20] The regional council also includes 3 non-inscrits, all former members of the FN group: Béatrix Bolvin, Pierre Delacroix, and Jean-Marie Garcin.[21][22] Though the possibility of raising the threshold to form a group to ten councillors was considered, the requirement was ultimately left unchanged at five.[23]

Political group Members President Parties
LR–DVD–SC The Republicans, Miscellaneous Right and Civil Society 82 Patrice Verchère LR, DVD, MoDem
FN National Front 31 Christophe Boudot FN
SD Socialists, Democrats 31 Jean-François Debat PS, DVG, EELV, LRC–Cap21
LD The Democrats 31 Romain Champel, Patrick Mignola UDI, MoDem
RCES Citizens, Ecologists, Solidarity Rally 9 Monique Cosson EELV, ND
PCF–FDG The Human First – PCF – Left Front 7 Cécile Cukierman PCF, PG, FI
LREM La Région En Marche 5 Olga Givernet LREM
PRG Radical Party of the Left 5 Sarah Boukaala PRG
NI Non-Inscrits 3

ExecutiveEdit

PresidentsEdit

Laurent Wauquiez was elected president of the regional council of Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes at its opening session in Lyon on 4 January 2016.[24]

Candidate Party Votes %
Laurent Wauquiez LR 113 55.39
Jean-François Debat PS 42 20.59
Christophe Boudot FN 34 16.67
Jean-Charles Kohlhaas EELV 8 3.92
Cécile Cukierman PCF 7 3.43
Votes 204 100.00
Blank and null votes 0 0.00
Valid votes 204 100.00

Vice presidentsEdit

In addition to the president, the executive consists of 15 vice presidents and 14 advisers.[16][25]

Number Regional councillor Group Delegate for Department
1st vice president Etienne Blanc LR–DVD–SC Finance, general administration, budgetary savings and cross-border policies Ain
2nd vice president Brice Hortefeux LR–DVD–SC Territorial planning and solidarity with the Auvergnat territories Puy-de-Dôme
3rd vice president Béatrice Berthoux LR–DVD–SC Lycées Rhône
4th vice president Eric Fournier LD Environment, sustainable development, energy and regional nature parks Haute-Savoie
5th vice president Philippe Meunier LR–DVD–SC Security, international partnerships, hunting and fishing, airports and airport areas, forests and woodlands Lyon Metropolis
6th vice president Annabel André-Laurent LR–DVD–SC Enterprises, employment, economic development, trade, crafts and liberal professions Haute-Savoie
7th vice president Martine Guibert LD Transport Cantal
8th vice president Jean-Pierre Taite LR–DVD–SC Agriculture, viticulture and local produce Loire
9th vice president Dominique Despras LD Social, health and family policies Rhône
10th vice president Yannick Neuder LR–DVD–SC Higher education, research and innovation and European funds Isère
11th vice president Stéphanie Pernod-Beaudon LR–DVD–SC Vocational training and apprenticeship Ain
12th vice president Juliette Jarry LR–DVD–SC Infrastructure, economy and digital usages Lyon Metropolis
13th vice president Nicolas Daragon LR–DVD–SC Tourism and spa industry Drôme
14th vice president Florence Verney-Carron LR–DVD–SC Culture and heritage Lyon Metropolis
15th vice president Marie-Camille Rey LR–DVD–SC Youth, sport and associative life Loire

CommitteesEdit

The regional council includes 18 thematic committees with advisory roles, each composed of 38 members with a chairperson and two vice chairpersons. The comments of the thematic committees are considered by and submitted to a final vote of the standing committee or in a plenary session.[16][26] The standing committee consists of the president, 15 vice presidents, and 45 members of the regional council.[27]

Committee President Group Department
Social action, city policy and housing Jérôme Moroge LR–DVD–SC Lyon Metropolis
Cultural affairs Marlène Mourier LR–DVD–SC Drôme
Agriculture, rurality, viticulture and food Jean-Pierre Vigier LR–DVD–SC Haute-Loire
Local economy, trade, crafts and liberal professions Alain Berlioz-Curlet LR–DVD–SC Lyon Metropolis
Higher education and research Pierre Bérat LR–DVD–SC Lyon Metropolis
Enterprise, economy and employment Daniel Dugléry LR–DVD–SC Allier
Environment, sustainable development and energy Michèle Cedrin LD Isère
Finance, general administration Thierry Kovacs LR–DVD–SC Isère
Continuing education and apprenticeship Lionel Filippi LD Isère
Initial education and lycées Claude Aurias LD Drôme
Mountain Gilles Chabert LR–DVD–SC Isère
Digital Samy Kefi-Jerome LD Loire
International relations and agricultural agreements Alain Marleix LR–DVD–SC Cantal
Health, family, and disabled persons policy Isabelle Masseboeuf LD Ardèche
Security Yves-Marie Uhlrich LD Lyon Metropolis
Tourism and spa industry Annabel André-Laurent LR–DVD–SC Haute-Savoie
Transport, territorial planning and infrastructure Jean-Pierre Taite LR–DVD–SC Loire
Associative life, sport and youth Xavier Breton LR–DVD–SC Ain

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Loi du 16 janvier 2015 relative à la délimitation des régions, aux élections régionales et départementales et modifiant le calendrier électoral". vie-publique.fr. 19 January 2015. Archived from the original on 13 July 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  2. ^ Céline Pauilhac (24 July 2014). "Malgré la fusion, Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes conserverait le même nombre de conseillers régionaux". France 3 Auvergne. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  3. ^ "Elections régionales 2015". vie-publique.fr. 23 November 2015. Archived from the original on 29 June 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  4. ^ Justin Boche (31 July 2015). "Lyon officiellement capitale de la région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes". Lyon Capitale. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  5. ^ a b c Georges Bourquard (28 January 2016). "À saisir, "Région loue hémicycle…"". Le Dauphiné Libéré. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  6. ^ a b "Nous trouver". La Région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  7. ^ "La région Rhône-Alpes investit son nouveau siège lyonnais". Le Moniteur. 25 May 2011. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  8. ^ Evelyne Rimbert (21 June 2014). "Le nouvel Hôtel de la Région Auvergne officiellement inauguré sur fond de polémiques". France 3 Auvergne. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  9. ^ Jean-Paul Gondeau (24 April 2013). "Auvergne : polémique sur le coût du futur hôtel de Région". La Montagne. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  10. ^ Mathilde Siraud (14 January 2016). "Nouvelles régions : le casse-tête de la réorganisation administrative". Le Figaro. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  11. ^ Anne-Laure Dagnet (10 January 2016). "A louer : hôtel de région à Clermont-Ferrand pour cause de fusion". franceinfo. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  12. ^ Mathilde Montagnon (25 May 2016). "Saint-Étienne : la culture, victime des dissensions entre Laurent Wauquiez et Gaël Perdriau ?". France Bleu Saint-Étienne Loire. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  13. ^ "Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes : l'opposition attaque la "clause Molière" en justice". Europe 1. Agence France-Presse. 27 March 2017. Archived from the original on 11 October 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  14. ^ "Résultats des élections régionales 2015". Ministère de l'Intérieur. 13 December 2015. Archived from the original on 6 September 2017. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  15. ^ Pierre Breteau; Samuel Laurent; Maxime Vaudano (5 August 2015). "Elections régionales : quel est le candidat dans votre (nouvelle) région ?". Le Monde. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  16. ^ a b c "Les élus". La Région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  17. ^ Dalya Daoud (30 November 2017). "Quelle tête a la nouvelle opposition de Laurent Wauquiez en Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes ?". Rue89Lyon. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018.
  18. ^ "La Newsletter #8 – Retour sur l'Assemblée plénière de Novembre 2017". Groupe Socialiste & Démocrate, Région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. 6 December 2017. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018.
  19. ^ @LREM_AURA (7 February 2018). "‼️VICTOIRE, suite à la mobilisation des Conseillers régionaux #LaREM : @OlgaGivernet @olivierveran @M_MeynierM @G_Gibouin @casalinof ▶️@laurentwauquiez rétropédale et rétablit la sub. au @_CNMA_ 🔴La mémoire ne se brade pas ! #AuvergneRhoneAlpes #actualites #EnMarche" (Tweet). Retrieved 9 February 2018 – via Twitter.
  20. ^ Olivier Beaumont; Valérie Hacot (11 January 2018). "Les Républicains : Laurent Wauquiez, mal-aimé, et alors ?". Le Parisien. Retrieved 9 February 2018.
  21. ^ "Les conseillers régionaux - mandature 2016-2021". La Région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Retrieved 5 April 2018.
  22. ^ "Indiscrétions". La Montagne. 4 February 2018.
  23. ^ Michel Rivet-Paturel (23 January 2016). "Huit groupes politiques pour l'assemblée régionale". Le Progrès. Archived from the original on 30 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018.
  24. ^ "Les présidents des nouvelles régions françaises prennent les commandes". L'Express. Agence France-Presse. 4 January 2016. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  25. ^ "Le Président et l'exécutif". La Région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Archived from the original on 20 February 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  26. ^ "Les délibérations de l'assemblée régionale". La Région Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  27. ^ Stéphane Moccozet (4 January 2016). "Conseil Régional d'Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes : qui sont les vice-présidents ?". France 3 Auvergne. Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 28 January 2018.

External linksEdit