Primera División (women)

The Primera División de la Liga de Fútbol Femenino, also known as Primera Iberdrola, formerly Liga Femenina Iberdrola for sponsorship reasons, is the highest level of league competition for women's football in Spain. Previously known as Superliga Femenina, División de Honor and Liga Nacional, it is the women's equivalent of the men's Primera División and is run by the Real Federación Española de Fútbol. The league was founded in 1988 and since then it has been celebrated without interruptions although it has undergone several changes of format and denomination.

Primera División
Liga Iberdrola.png
Founded1988
CountrySpain
ConfederationUEFA
Number of teams16
Level on pyramid1
Relegation toSegunda División
Domestic cup(s)Copa de la Reina
International cup(s)UEFA Champions League
Current championsAtlético Madrid (4th title)
(2018–19)
Most championshipsAthletic Bilbao (5 titles)
TV partnersBeIN Sports (Spain)
Esport3
ETB 1
Gol T
WebsiteWebsite
2019–20 season

Being the sixth competition with the best coefficient, it is considered one of the most important women's leagues in Europe according to the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA).

Throughout its history 12 clubs have been champions; Athletic Bilbao have won the most championships, with five.

HistoryEdit

Liga NacionalEdit

The league was founded in 1988 as Liga Nacional, formed by Olímpico Fortuna, Puente Castro, Parque Alcobendas, Santa María Atlético, Vallès Occidental, RCD Español, FC Barcelona, CE Sabadell and Peña Barcelonista Barcilona.

División de HonorEdit

From the season 1996-97 the league was divided in 4 groups. In that time, all group winners played a semi-final and a final to decide the champion.

SuperligaEdit

 
Old logo of the league.

For the 2001–02 season the league was renamed to Superliga and the competition system was changed from the groups format to a double round-robin, thus each team playing the other teams twice, one time away, one time at home. The league consisted of 14 teams in those years. The 2008–09 season kept the double round-robin format but the league was increased from 14 to 16 teams.

In the 2009–10 season the Superliga was increased from 16 to 24 teams, which caused criticism by teams and players, fearing a decline in the quality of competition. The Superliga again is divided in 3 groups of 7 to 8 teams each.[1] Those groups are divided based on local aspects. In the first stage of the season, in all groups each team plays each other twice. After that, the second stage starts. The best two of each group as well as the two best third-place finishers go into group A, the other teams are divided into group B and C based on a predefined key. Again a double round-robin is played in the groups. All Group A teams and the three best finishers of Group B and C qualify for the Copa de la Reina, and the two best teams in Group A play each other in a two legged final for the season's championship. Rayo Vallecano won the 2009-10 and 2010-11 finals, both times against RCD Espanyol. In the 2009–10 season, two teams had to withdraw from the league for financial reasons.

Primera DivisiónEdit

For the 2011–12 season, in addition to the rename of the league to Primera División, the group based system was eliminated and 18 teams played double round-robin to decide the champion, shortening it to 16 teams for the 2012–13 one. Before the 2016–17, the Royal Spanish Football Federation agreed a sponsorship with Iberdrola, renaming the league as Liga Iberdrola for commercial issues,[2] slightly changing it to Primera Iberdrola in 2019.

TeamsEdit

Canary Islands location of the 2019–20 Primera División teams

Deportivo La Coruña and Tacón promoted from Segunda División. They will replace Málaga and Fundación Albacete, that were relegated as the two last qualified in the previous edition.

Stadia and locationsEdit

Team Home city Stadium
Athletic Bilbao   Bilbao Lezama
Atlético Madrid   Madrid Centro Deportivo Wanda
Barcelona   Barcelona Johan Cruyff
Deportivo La Coruña   A Coruña Abegondo
Espanyol   Barcelona Dani Jarque
UDG Tenerife   Granadilla de Abona La Palmera
Levante   Valencia Ciudad Deportiva
Logroño   Logroño Las Gaunas
Madrid CFF   San Sebastián de los Reyes Nuevo Matapiñonera
Rayo Vallecano   Madrid Ciudad Deportiva
Real Betis   Seville Luis del Sol
Real Sociedad   San Sebastián Zubieta
Sevilla   Seville Jesús Navas
Sporting Huelva   Huelva La Orden
Tacón   Madrid Ciudad Real Madrid
Valencia   Valencia Antonio Puchades

List of championsEdit

The following list shows all champions of the Spanish women's football league.[3] Before creation of the league, from 1983 to 1988 the Copa de la Reina de Fútbol winners were the Spanish Champions.

Season Teams Champion Points Runner-up Points Third place Points
Liga Nacional
1988–89 9 Peña Barcilona 24 Parque Alcobendas 21 Español 20
1989–90 12 Atlético Villa de Madrid 43 Peña Barcilona 39 Español 30
1990–91 8 Oiartzun 20 Atlético Villa de Madrid 20 Añorga 20
1991–92 8 Añorga 27 CF Barcelona 19 Oiartzun 17
1992–93 7 Oroquieta Villaverde 24 Añorga 21 CF Barcelona 20
1993–94 10 Oroquieta Villaverde 49 Añorga 42 CF Barcelona 40
1994–95 10 Añorga 48 Oroquieta Villaverde 40 Espanyol 34
1995–96 9 Añorga 36 Oroquieta Villaverde 31 Espanyol 30
División de Honor
1996–97 Sant Vicent [N 1] Añorga - -
1997–98 45 Atlético Málaga [N 2] Sant Vicent - -
1998–99 50 Oroquieta Villaverde [N 3] Puebla - -
1999–2000 50 Puebla [N 4] Torrejón - -
2000–01 56 Levante [N 5] Eibartarrak - -
Superliga
2001–02 11 Levante 57 Puebla 51 Espanyol 37
2002–03 12 Athletic Bilbao 55 Levante 55 Puebla 46
2003–04 14 Athletic Bilbao 60 Sabadell 58 Levante 58
2004–05 14 Athletic Bilbao 66[N 6] Levante 63 Espanyol 57
2005–06 13 Espanyol 60 Híspalis[N 7] 60 Levante 55
2006–07 14 Athletic Bilbao 64 Espanyol 63 Levante 55
2007–08 14 Levante 71 Rayo Vallecano 71 Athletic Bilbao 53
2008–09 16 Rayo Vallecano 81 Levante 76 Athletic Bilbao 65
2009–10 22 Rayo Vallecano [N 8] Espanyol - Athletic Bilbao -
2010–11 23 Rayo Vallecano [N 9] Espanyol - Athletic Bilbao -
Primera División
2011–12 18 Barcelona 94 Athletic Bilbao 91 Espanyol 76
2012–13 16 Barcelona 76 Athletic Bilbao 74 Atlético Madrid 68
2013–14 16 Barcelona 79 Athletic Bilbao 69 Atlético Madrid 54
2014–15 16 Barcelona 77 Atlético Madrid 69 Athletic Bilbao 65
2015–16 16 Athletic Bilbao 78 Barcelona 77 Atlético Madrid 69
2016–17 16 Atlético Madrid 78[N 10] Barcelona 75 Valencia 68
2017–18 16 Atlético Madrid 77 Barcelona 76 Athletic Bilbao 56
2018–19 16 Atlético Madrid 84 Barcelona 78 Levante 57

Performance by clubEdit

Since the inception of the SuperligaEdit

Teams Winners Runners-Up Winning years
Athletic Bilbao 5 3 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2016
Barcelona 4 3 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Rayo Vallecano 3 1 2009, 2010, 2011
Atlético Madrid 3 1 2017, 2018, 2019
Levante 2 3 2002, 2008
Espanyol 1 3 2006
Puebla 0 1
Sabadell 0 1
Híspalis 0 1

OverallEdit

 
Athletic Bilbao celebrating its fourth title, won in 2007
Teams Winners Runners-Up Winning years
Athletic Bilbao 5 3 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2016
Levante 4 4 1997,[a] 2001, 2002, 2008
Barcelona 4 4 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Atlético Madrid 4 2 1990,[b] 2017, 2018, 2019
Añorga 3 3 1992, 1995, 1996
Oroquieta Villaverde 3 2 1993, 1994, 1999
Rayo Vallecano 3 1 2009, 2010, 2011
Espanyol 1 3 2006
Puebla[c] 1 2 2000
Peña Barcilona 1 1 1989
Oiartzun 1 0 1991
Atlético Málaga[d] 1 0 1998
Sabadell 0 1
Parque Alcobendas 0 1
Torrejón 0 1
Eibartarrak[e] 0 1
Híspalis 0 1

Marked in italic those teams that won the Copa de la Reina that season

  1. ^ Title won as Sant Vicent València CFF.
  2. ^ Title won as Atlético Villa de Madrid.
  3. ^ Currently Extremadura UD.
  4. ^ Currently Málaga CF.
  5. ^ Currently SD Eibar.

All-time Primera División tableEdit

This table includes all games played since the 2001–02 season, when the Superliga recovered its format of a single group after several years with four groups and the group winners playing a Final Four. For a timeline of each team's league record, see List of women's football clubs in Spain.

Pos S Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts 2019–20 league
1 17 Athletic Bilbao 480 332 68 80 1309 494 +815 1064 Primera División
2 18 Levante 496 311 84 101 1159 460 +699 1017
3 18 Espanyol 500 260 84 156 1131 705 +426 864
4 14 Barcelona 404 264 55 85 1023 359 +664 847
5 16 Rayo Vallecano 458 250 69 139 1015 649 +366 819
6 13 Atlético Madrid 378 233 68 77 843 578 +265 767
7 13 Real Sociedad 382 143 85 154 537 529 +8 514
8 12 Valencia[a] 356 146 60 150 587 560 +27 498
9 13 Sporting Huelva 376 135 77 164 545 618 −73 482
10 13 Zaragoza CFF 376 126 66 184 544 736 −192 444 Segunda División
11 10 Torrejón 250 120 39 91 505 429 +76 399 Regional leagues
12 8 Puebla[b] 170 92 22 56 385 269 +116 298 Segunda División
13 12 Oviedo Moderno[c] 314 73 62 179 363 697 −334 281
14 9 Lagunak 248 75 38 135 295 519 −224 263 Regional leagues
15 7 Híspalis[d] 170 64 20 86 327 439 −112 212 Primera Nacional
16 7 Collerense 204 55 36 113 295 466 −171 201 Segunda División
17 4 Granadilla 120 60 21 39 196 158 +38 201 Primera División
18 7 Sevilla[d] 198 57 30 111 241 395 −154 201
19 5 L'Estartit 140 51 18 71 229 274 −45 171 Regional leagues
20 5 Sant Gabriel 152 49 24 79 213 307 −94 171 Primera Nacional
21 5 Estudiantes 118 50 19 49 284 241 +43 166[e] Dissolved
22 4 Sabadell 94 50 15 29 292 175 +117 165 Regional leagues
23 3 Real Betis 90 38 14 38 123 123 0 128 Primera División
24 5 Fundación Albacete 149 31 31 87 202 358 −156 124 Segunda División
25 4 Santa Teresa 120 32 25 63 124 229 −105 121
26 5 Málaga[f] 143 32 24 87 144 382 −238 120
27 5 Pozuelo de Alarcón 124 24 14 86 173 391 −218 86
28 4 Nuestra Señora de Belén 94 22 7 65 109 357 −248 73 Primera Nacional
29 3 Llanos de Olivenza[g] 94 19 14 61 97 203 −106 71
30 2 Madrid CFF 60 18 9 33 65 121 −56 63 Primera División
31 2 Levante Las Planas 60 15 9 36 61 120 −59 54 Regional leagues
32 2 Las Palmas 50 14 6 30 80 114 −34 48 Dissolved
33 2 Reocín 62 11 10 41 72 188 −116 43
34 2 Oiartzun 60 10 12 38 47 141 −94 42 Primera Nacional
35 1 Logroño 30 8 5 17 38 60 −22 29 Primera División
36 1 Granada 30 5 7 18 41 81 −40 22 Segunda División
37 2 Eibar 54 4 8 42 49 175 −126 20
38 2 Valladolid 52 4 8 40 40 167 −127 20 Dissolved
39 3 Nuestra Señora de la Antigua 68 5 5 58 50 280 −230 20
40 1 El Olivo 34 5 4 25 43 112 −69 19
41 1 Tacuense 30 3 6 21 22 85 −63 15 Segunda División
42 1 Atlético Jiennense[h] 24 3 2 19 23 81 −58 11 Regional leagues
43 2 Gimnàstic 52 3 1 48 25 224 −199 10 Dissolved
44 1 Gijón 24 0 1 23 19 96 −77 1 Primera Nacional
45 0 Deportivo La Coruña 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Primera División
46 0 Tacón 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Updated to match(es) played on the end of the 2018–19 season. Source: FutFem.com
Notes:
  1. ^ Previously named Colegio Alemán.
  2. ^ Later named Extremadura Femenino and currently named Extremadura.
  3. ^ Currently named Oviedo.
  4. ^ a b Games between 2001 and 2007 are included in Híspalis, while games since 2009 are included in Sevilla.
  5. ^ 3 points docked.
  6. ^ Previously named Atlético Málaga.
  7. ^ Currently named Badajoz.
  8. ^ Current name, played in Primera División as Jaén.

Top goalscorer by seasonEdit

Season Player Club Goals
2001–02
2002–03
2003–04
2004–05
2005–06 Auxiliadora Jiménez Híspalis 29
2006–07
2007–08 Natalia Pablos Rayo Vallecano 24
2008–09 Erika Vázquez Athletic Bilbao 32
2009–10 Adriana Martín Rayo Vallecano 35
2010–11 Verónica Boquete Espanyol 39
2011–12 Sonia Bermúdez Barcelona 38
2012–13 Sonia Bermúdez Barcelona 27
Natalia Pablos Rayo Vallecano
2013–14 Sonia Bermúdez Barcelona 28
2014–15 Sonia Bermúdez Barcelona 22
Adriana Martín Levante
2015–16 Jennifer Hermoso Barcelona 24
2016–17 Jennifer Hermoso Barcelona 35
2017–18 Charlyn Corral Levante 24
2018–19 Jennifer Hermoso Atlético Madrid 24

See alsoEdit

Copa de la Reina de Fútbol

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a final group played by the four group winners in a double legged round-robin tournament.
  2. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Atlético Málaga beat Sant Vicènt by 2–0.
  3. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Oroquieta Villaverde beat Irex Puebla.
  4. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Irex Puebla beat Torrejón in the penalty shootout after a draw by 0–0.
  5. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a single-game final where Levante beat Eibartarrak by 4–0.
  6. ^ Unbeaten season (26 matches)
  7. ^ Sevilla FC participated as sponsor of CD Híspalis, before creating its own team in 2008.
  8. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a double-legged final where Rayo Vallecano won 1–0 and 1–1.
  9. ^ Played with teams divided into groups, the title was decided in a double-legged final where Rayo Vallecano won 2–2 and 1–2.
  10. ^ Unbeaten season (30 matches)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Reunión Comisión Mixta de seguimiento de la Superliga Archived 11 October 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Iberdrola patrocinará la Primera División Femenina" (in Spanish). La Liga. 22 August 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2016.
  3. ^ "Spain - List of Women's Champions". RSSSF. 2010. Retrieved 8 May 2011.

External linksEdit