Polygonal masonry

Polygonal masonry is a technique of stone wall construction. True polygonal masonry is a technique wherein the visible surfaces of the stones are dressed with straight sides or joints, giving the block the appearance of a polygon.[1]

This technique is found throughout the world and sometimes corresponds to the less technical category of Cyclopean masonry.[2]

PlacesEdit

CrimeaEdit

Easter IslandEdit

 
Ahu Vinapú

EcuadorEdit

FinlandEdit

 
A part of the wall of the Bomarsund Fortress

GeorgiaEdit

GreeceEdit

 
Section of polygonal wall at Delphi

HungaryEdit

IndiaEdit

IndonesiaEdit

IranEdit

ItalyEdit

 
Velia, Porta Rosa

In Italy, polygonal masonry is particularly indicative of the region of Latium, but it occurs also in Etruria, Lucania, Samnium, and Umbria; scholars including Giuseppe Lugli have carried out studies of the technique.[3][4] Some notable sites that have fortification walls built in this technique include Norba, Signia, Alatri, Boiano, Circeo, Cosa, Alba Fucens, Palestrina, and Terracina.[5] The Porta Rosa of the ancient city of Velia employs a variant of the technique known as Lesbian masonry.[1]

JapanEdit

 
Shuri Castle, Naha

LatviaEdit

 
Daugavpils Fortress

MaltaEdit

MexicoEdit

MontenegroEdit

 
Entrance to Stützpunkt Grabovac at the rear of Fort Trašte

MoroccoEdit

PeruEdit

 
Sacsayhuamán, Cusco, Perú
 
Pumacocha Archaeological site

PhilippinesEdit

PortugalEdit

RomaniaEdit

 
Iulia Hasdeu Castle

RussiaEdit

 
Fort Alexander I

SpainEdit

SudanEdit

SwedenEdit

SyriaEdit

 
Hosn Suleiman temple
 
Pyramidal tomb in 6th century Bauda, one of the former Dead Cities in northwestern Syria
 
The press-house of Serjilla, Syria

ThailandEdit

TurkeyEdit

 
Selimiye Kışlası

United KingdomEdit

United StatesEdit

 
Memorial Quadrangle Gate at Yale

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b G.R.H. Wright (23 November 2009). Ancient Building Technology, Volume 3: Construction (2 Vols). BRILL. pp. 154–. ISBN 90-04-17745-0.
  2. ^ Carmelo G. Malacrino (2010). Constructing the Ancient World: Architectural Techniques of the Greeks and Romans. Getty Publications. pp. 97–. ISBN 978-1-60606-016-2.
  3. ^ Frank, T. 1924. "Roman buildings of the Republic: an attempt to date them from their materials." MAAR 3.
  4. ^ Giuseppe Lugli (1957). La Tecnica Edilizia Romana Con Particolare Riguardo a Roma E Lazio: Testo. 1. Johnson Reprint.
  5. ^ Jeffrey Alan Becker (2007). The Building Blocks of Empire: Civic Architecture, Central Italy, and the Roman Middle Republic. ProQuest. pp. 109–. ISBN 978-0-549-55847-7.
  • P. Gros. 1996. L'architecture romaine: du début du IIIe siècle av. J.-C. à la fin du Haut-Empire. 2 v. Paris: Picard.